Words and Proper Names

's ann (ScG)

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.

s

1723.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Lenition and dependency phonology.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), pp. 457–494.
[1.] Two-gesture segmental matrix; [2.] Dependency Phonology; [3.] The lenition series in Irish; [4.] Lenition of stops; [5.] Lenition of liquids: /m/ → [ɯ̃]; [6.] Lenition of the liquids: /L N/ → [l n]; [7.] Lenition of the liquids: /R/ → [r]; [8.] Lenition of /s/; [9.] Lenition of /f/; [10.] Lenition in initial clusters; [11.] Summary.

s-

771.
Ahlqvist (Anders): On adverbs of place in Irish.
In ZCP 35 (1976), pp. 158–168.
Examines the Irish adverbs of place, with particular emphasis on the directional prefixes t-, s-, an-.

-s-

3804.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 3. Some infixed pronouns in Old Irish.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 165–167.
On the confusion of the acc. sg. fem and acc. pl. forms of the infixed pronoun.
3081.
Lindeman (Fredrik O.): Varia: 1. On some infixed pronouns in British.
In ÉtC 26 (1989), pp. 73–76.
Discusses the OIr. 2nd and 3rd pl. infix pronouns -s- and -n-.

Republ. in Lindeman studies, pp. 178-181.

s (ʃ> ʤ)

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.

s > z

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.

s- (prosthetic)

550.
Gleasure (James): Varia: III. More on (s)beach/(s)meach.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 186–191.
Discusses variation between initial b- and m-, and prosthetic s-.

Sabrann

3617.
Hamp (Eric P.): Morphological interpretations: 1. Sabrina.
In StC 22–23 (1987–1988), p. 7.

sacadh

6927.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some possible congeners of English slang ‘to sock’.
In Word 28/1-2 (1976), pp. 140–145.
On Ir. sacadh and its relationship to Engl. sock ‘strike hard’ and MLat. saccāre.

sacart

2929.
Bammesberger (Alfred): Vieil irlandais sacart et vieil anglais sacerd.
In ÉtC 16 (1979), pp. 187–189.
Argues that OE sacerd is a loanword from Old Irish.
14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

sacerdos

1481.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): A study of the Irish legend of the wild man.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 179–206.
1. Introduction; 2. The characteristics of madness; 3. A tale of the novice; 4. The curse of a sacerdos; 5. A battlefield experience; 6. The consumption of contaminated food or drink; 7. The loss of a lover; 8. The madman takes to the wilderness; 9. The madman perches on trees; 10. The madman levitates or performs great leaps; 11. The madman is very swift; 12. The madman is restless and travels great distances; 13. The madman experiences hallucinations; 14. The madman collects firewood and goes about naked; 15. The madman observes a specialdiet; 16. The act of coition; 17. The intervention of a sacerdos; 18. Conclusions: geltacht is a sub-theme of the parent theme of the novitiate. Cf. P. Ó Riain, Boundary association in early Irish society, StC 7 (1972), pp. 12–29.

-sadar (ScG)

4294.
Cox (Richard A. V.): The origin and relative chronology of shader-names in the Hebrides.
In SGS 16 (1990), pp. 95–113.
Argues that shader-names derive from ON sǽtr only, and suggests a revision of the traditional relative chronology of the Norse place-name elements in the West of Scotland.

sadess

903.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. turgaire ‘act of inciting’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), p. 183.

saer

15097.
Ní Ghrádaigh (Jenifer): A legal perspective on the saer and workshop practice in pre-Norman Ireland.
In Making and meaning in insular art (2007), pp. 110–125.
Discusses the qualities and entitlements of the saer; draws particularly on a legal text dealing with the refection and fees due to craftsmen (= CIH vi 2107.36-2108.23; with English translation).

sagart

5032.
Mac Aodha (Breandán S.): The priest and the Mass in Irish place-names.
In Nomina 14 (1990), pp. 77–82.
sagart, Aifrinn as place-name elements.

saibhir

1783.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 379–383.
1. léas; 2. léasann; 3. Saibhir; 4. Gléachás / gléacas / gléachas; 5. ‘lashings’; 6. 'spoiled priest’.

saich

1125.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. 3. Ml. 44b29.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 126–127.
Against the emendation of fochaid for MS foich < *fo-saich ‘evil’.

-saig

3478.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Nodiadau amrywiol: [7.] Welsh haeddu.
In BBCS 30/1-2 (Nov. 1982), pp. 49–50.
Discusses the historical morphology of OIr. saigid.

saigid

3137.
Eska (Joseph F.): More on Gaulish siöxt=i.
In ÉtC 30 (1994), pp. 205–210.
Rejects the view that OIr. siächt and Gaul. siöxt are cognates.
3478.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Nodiadau amrywiol: [7.] Welsh haeddu.
In BBCS 30/1-2 (Nov. 1982), pp. 49–50.
Discusses the historical morphology of OIr. saigid.
3217.
Ford (Patrick K.), Hamp (Eric P.): Welsh asswynaw and Celtic legal idiom.
In BBCS 26/2 (May 1975), pp. 147–160.
Pt.I: Discusses Welsh and Irish idioms for legally bound protection; Pt. II: Etymological discussion (particularly on Ir. aithlech, saigid, snáidid, naidm).

sail

1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.
1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.
7000.
Huld (Martin E.): The linguistic typology of the Old European substrata in North Central Europe.
In JIES 18/3-4 (Fall/Winter 1990), pp. 389–423.
Discusses OIr. gann, mucc, marc, treb; ubull, coll, sail.

sail escaine

3370.
Wiley (Dan M.): The maledictory psalms.
In Peritia 15 (2001), pp. 261–279.
On the sailm escaine, or ritual use of a cursus of 20 salms as a means of cursing enemies.

sailm

218.
de Bhaldraithe (T.): Palmaire agus focail eile.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 76–81.
1. palmaire/falmaire/falmaireacht; 2. fámaire/fámaireacht; 3. palmaire/falmaire; 4. falmadóir/halmadóir; 5. failm/ailm; 6. pailméar; 7. pám; 8. tailm/sailm/failm.

sa(i)n cha(i)n

1499.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Techt tuidecht.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 1–6.
On ‘rhyming jingles’, often consisting of nominalised imperatives, e.g. techt tuidecht, aig thaig, soí toí, áin tháin (ám [t]hám in LL 34840 corrupt); cf. sa(i)n cha(i)n, baí chaí, ócaib tócaib — all denoting `(quick) movement to and fro’. Some discussion of rhyming combinations of two words in ModIr.

sáirse

1954.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 124–130.
1. góirséad; 2. mábla; 3. miúndáil; 4. sáirse; 5. slincín; 6. trombhód.

saithe

2935.
Watkins (Calvert): Old Irish saithe, Welsh haid: etymology and metaphor.
In ÉtC 16 (1979), pp. 191–194.
Suggests a semantic shift from PIE abstract *sh2tyo- ‘satiety’ to concrete PC *satio- ‘swarm of bees’.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 622-625.

sál

3152.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 87–90.
1. sál; 2. sed; 3. slabar; 4. slice; 5. ta-; 6. tadg, tál; 7. tarr, torrach; 8. tinaid; 9. tindabrad, Findabair; 10. úall, úabar, úais; 11. *u̯ernā?, fern.

sal (Ul)

3009.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 15. Baskisch-Keltische Etymologien.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 85–87.
OIr. sor, sar, sarachán; berbad, bruth; lágha, láighe.

Salamonis

1642.
Dumville (David): Late-seventh or eighth-century evidence for the British transmission of Pelagius.
In CMCS 10 (Winter 1985), pp. 39–52.
Ed. of scribal colophon on Pelagius’s Commentary on the Pauline Epistles from MSS Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat. 9530 and Salisbury, Cathedral Library, 5; with Engl transl. Suggests that the text was copied in Wales. Discusses the names Helisęus, Merianus and Salamonis.

salann

10610.
Scott (B. G.): Some conflicts and correspondences of evidence in the study of Irish archaeology and language.
In Studies on early Ireland [Duignan essays] (1982), pp. 115–119.
1. Salt [OIr. salann, murluaithe]; 2. Metal sources, metalworkers, metalworking sites and metallulrgical processes; 3. Gold in early Irish language and archaeology [OIr. ór].

Sall, Andrew FitzBennet (1613–86)

1986.
Breeze (Andrew): Andrew Sall (†1682), Andrew Sall (†1686), and the Irish Bible.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 100–102.
ad N. J. A. Williams, I bprionta i leabhar: na Protastúin agus prós na Gaeilge, 1567-1724 (Dublin 1986).

Sall, Andrew FitzJohn (fl. 1639–82)

1986.
Breeze (Andrew): Andrew Sall (†1682), Andrew Sall (†1686), and the Irish Bible.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 100–102.
ad N. J. A. Williams, I bprionta i leabhar: na Protastúin agus prós na Gaeilge, 1567-1724 (Dublin 1986).

saltair

506.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Focail i saothar Dháibhidh Uí Bhruadair.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 461–464.
1. atharrach; 2. feidheal; 3. gail; 4. saltair; 5. scaradh; 6. suim.

Saltee Island Great

2336.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Ainm Gaeilge ar an Great Saltee?
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 60–64.
Proposes Ir. Éininis.

sam

11967.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): The Indo-European year.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 414–495.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms blíadain, ónn uraid (MIr. innuraid), gaim, gem, gam, gaimred, errach, sam, samrad, fog(a)mar, feis, gamuin, fannall, samaisc, eórna.

sam bith (ScG)

3710.
McCaughey (Terence P.): Scottish Gaelic sam bith.
In SGS 12/1 (Sep. 1971), pp. 30–33.
On the unexpected eclipsis seen in this form.

Samain

13126.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): A pig for Samhain?
In Chaucer and the challenges of medievalism (2003), pp. 311–325.
Discusses literary and folklore references to the banb samna.

samaisc

6960.
Campanile (Enrico): I.E. metaphors and non-I.E. metaphors.
In JIES 2/3 (Fall 1974), pp. 247–258.
On Indo-European analogues of the metaphorical use of samaisc in the sense of ‘girl’ seen in Longes mac n-Uislenn §9 (as ed. by V. Hull, 1949).
11967.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): The Indo-European year.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 414–495.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms blíadain, ónn uraid (MIr. innuraid), gaim, gem, gam, gaimred, errach, sam, samrad, fog(a)mar, feis, gamuin, fannall, samaisc, eórna.

samchásc

1430.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): Irish observance of the Three Lents and the date of the St. Gall Priscian (MS 904).
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 159–180.
Some discussion of the terms samchásc ‘summer Easter’, corgus ‘Lent’, samchorgus ‘summer Lent’, gamchorgus ‘winter Lent’ and minchásc ‘Low Sunday’. Concludes that the St Gall Priscian MS was begun in October 850 and completed in August 851.

samchorgus

1430.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): Irish observance of the Three Lents and the date of the St. Gall Priscian (MS 904).
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 159–180.
Some discussion of the terms samchásc ‘summer Easter’, corgus ‘Lent’, samchorgus ‘summer Lent’, gamchorgus ‘winter Lent’ and minchásc ‘Low Sunday’. Concludes that the St Gall Priscian MS was begun in October 850 and completed in August 851.

samhlat

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

samildánach

617.
Maier (Bernhard): Is Lug to be identified with Mercury (Bell. Gall. VI 17, 1)? New suggestions on an old problem.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 127–135.
Considers the frequency of the element Lugu- in toponomy; the coincidence in date of the festival of Lugnusad and the annual festival in hounour of the Emperor Augustus at Lugudunum (Lyons); and the similarity of the Lug’s epithet samildánach to Caesar’s characterisation of Mercury as omnium inventor artium.

samrad

11967.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): The Indo-European year.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 414–495.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms blíadain, ónn uraid (MIr. innuraid), gaim, gem, gam, gaimred, errach, sam, samrad, fog(a)mar, feis, gamuin, fannall, samaisc, eórna.

Samson (St) of Dol

1378.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): Samson alias San(c)tán?
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 320–323.
Discusses an Irish episode in Vita Sancti Samsonis.

samthrosc

17980.
Grace (Pierce A.): From blefed to scamach: pestilence in early medieval Ireland.
In PRIA-C 118 (2018), pp. 67–93.
Attempts to identify various epidemic diseases recorded in the Irish annals, ad 540–795: blefed, buide chonnaill (or crón chonnaill), samthrosc, bolgach, baccach, riuth fola, scamach.

-(s)an

2657.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Indogermanische Demonstrativa und der altirische Artikel.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 259–271.
Traces the development of the Old Irish article from its origin in the Indo-European demonstrative stem *so/to- to its partial substitution by the root *sem- ‘one’.
2984.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Note phonologique sur le type vieil-irlandais dinad(rícthe).
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 161–163.
Discusses the negative prepositional relatives, especially with regard to the presence of the relative particle in these constructions.

sanas

2233.
Russell (Paul): The sounds of a silence: the growth of Cormac’s glossary.
In CMCS 15 (Summer 1988), pp. 1–30.
Incl. survey of extant native glossaries and their MS versions.

Sannda (ScG)

8721.
Cox (Richard A. V.): Scottish Gaelic Sannda and its aliases.
In JSNS 4 (2010), pp. 61–102.

saor

3464.
Greene (David): Varia: IV. 2. ‘Cheap’ and ‘dear’ in Modern Irish.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 161–167.
saor, daor, and derivates.

saothrughadh

1476.
McManus (Damian): The bardic poet as teacher, student and critic: a context for the grammatical tracts.
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 97–123.
On the training of bardic poets; stresses the role of ‘books’. Incl. discussion of associated terminology, e.g. saothrughadh ‘training’, cúrsa saothruighthe ‘a course of study’, duan dheiridh shaothair ‘composition to secure graduation’, sgagadh ‘straining, sifting’, glanadh ‘cleansing’, gleódh ‘purifying’, breithniughadh ‘judging, examining’, oide ‘teacher’.

sar

3009.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 15. Baskisch-Keltische Etymologien.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 85–87.
OIr. sor, sar, sarachán; berbad, bruth; lágha, láighe.

sàsar (ScG)

210.
Grannd (Seumas): The lexical geography of the Western Isles.
In ScotL 14–15 (1995–1996), pp. 52–65.
1. saucer (sàsar, flat); 2. hair (of the head) (gruag, falt); 3. oystercatcher (trìlleachan, brìdean); 4. smoke (from the chimney) (toit, ceò); 5. porridge (brochan, lite); 6. blue (of the sky) (liath, gorm); 7. grey (of hair) (glas, liath); 8. Sunday (Di-Dòmhnaich, Latha na Sàbaid) – all with corresponding maps.

Saulum

16528.
Downey (Clodagh): Who was Ailill Moṡaulum?
In Celtica 29 (2017), pp. 38–54.
Suggests the possibility of a Ciarraige origin for Moṡaulum, Ailill (Áulomm)'s alias in Scéla Moṡauluim.

Saxain

5042.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Nationality names in the Irish annals.
In Nomina 16 (1992–1993), pp. 49–70.
Discusses the terms Ériu, Féni, Scotti, Goídil, Cruthin, Picti, Albu, Bretain, Angli, Saxain, Frainc, Geinti, Gaill, Gall-Ghaedhil, Nordmainn, Lochlainn, Danair.

scaball cocúis

3766.
Quin (E. G.): Textual notes: [2] A phrase in Críth gablach.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), p. 94.
ad D. A. Binchy 1941 (BILL 1479).

scadán

1435.
Schrijver (Peter): Varia: V. Non-Indo-European surviving in Ireland in the first millenium AD.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 195–199.
Incl. discussion of partán ‘crab’, Partraige (ethnonym), (partaing > Lat. parthicus), pattu ‘hare’, petta ‘hare’, pell ‘horse’, pít ‘portion of food’, pluc `(round) mass’, prapp ‘rapid’, gliomach ‘lobster’, faochán ‘periwinkle’, ciotóg ‘left hand’, bradán ‘salmon’, scadán ‘herring’. Cf. G. R. Isaac, in Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 151-155.
Isaac (G. R.) (ref.)
2575.
Schrijver (Peter): Varia: I. More on non-Indo-European surviving in Ireland in the first millennium ad.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 137–144.
partán, Partraige; ad G. Isaac, in Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 151-153; cf. P. Schrijver, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 195-199.

Further non-Indo-European etyma discussed include: pell/fell, petta, pít/fít, pluc/prapp, patu/pata, scatán, ciotóg.

scaile

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

scainnear

11712.
Breeze (Andrew): A Gaelic origin for skunnyrrit ‘scattered’ in Barbour’s Bruce.
In N&Q 51/3 (Sep. 2004), p. 237.
< Ir. scainnear.

scaltae (Lat)

1221.
Harvey (Anthony), Power (Jane): Varia: IV. Hiberno-Latin scaltae.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 277–279.
Earliest two references from Hisperica famina.

scamach

15855.
Ní Chrábhagáin (Ciara): Disease and illness in medieval Ireland: an anthropological examination of some hagiographical material.
In RíM 24 (2013), pp. 115–133.
Examines the usage of names of illnesses and diseases occurring in the text of Bethada náem nÉrenn: 1. amlabar, bacach, bodhar, clamhdall, lobhar; 2. aillse, fiolun fionn, easbadha, cuthach; scamach, lirach, moirtin marbh, bás obann, ifreann; esláinte theinntidhe, galar cos, demhan.
17980.
Grace (Pierce A.): From blefed to scamach: pestilence in early medieval Ireland.
In PRIA-C 118 (2018), pp. 67–93.
Attempts to identify various epidemic diseases recorded in the Irish annals, ad 540–795: blefed, buide chonnaill (or crón chonnaill), samthrosc, bolgach, baccach, riuth fola, scamach.

scamall

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

scamh

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

scam(h)a

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

scam(h)ach

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

scamhadh

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

scamhal

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

scánnán

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

scansáil

366.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail: II.
In Celtica 16 (1984), p. 56.
foirisiún (from Engl. portion); 2. scansáil (from Engl. sconce). Exx. from Cois Fharraige.

Scaoinse

6036.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): Squince agus ainmneacha gaolmahra.
In JCHAS 100 (1995), pp. 161–166.
Squince Harbour, Co. Cork; Ir. Scaoinse.

scapulimancy

1616.
Burnett (Charles S. F.): Arabic divinatory texts and Celtic folklore: a comment on the theory and practice of scapulimancy in Western Europe.
In CMCS 6 (Winter 1983), pp. 31–42.
The practice of divination from sheep’s shoulder blades (ScG slinneannachd) is traced from seventeenth century Gaelic folk-culture back to medieval Arabic treatises composed in Spain. Incl. plts.

scaradh

506.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Focail i saothar Dháibhidh Uí Bhruadair.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 461–464.
1. atharrach; 2. feidheal; 3. gail; 4. saltair; 5. scaradh; 6. suim.

Scardan, Co. Westmeath

10598.
Forbes (Will): Scardan, Co. Westmeath.
In Above and beyond [Swan memorial essays] (2005), pp. 249–265.
Interprets this place name within the context of Patrician literature (particularly Trip2 849-852).

Scartan

10598.
Forbes (Will): Scardan, Co. Westmeath.
In Above and beyond [Swan memorial essays] (2005), pp. 249–265.
Interprets this place name within the context of Patrician literature (particularly Trip2 849-852).

scatán

1161.
Isaac (G. R.): Varia: I. Some Old Irish etymologies, and some conclusions drawn from them.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 151–155.
vs. P. Schrijver, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 195-196; especially on the evidence for speakers of a non-Indo-European language in 6th c. Ireland. 1. pell ‘horse’ [pell < L pellis ‘hide, skin’; meaning of ‘horse’ may represent an instance of pars pro toto]; 2. petta ‘pet’ [a loan from Brit. *petti-]; 3. pít ‘ration of food’ [< fít ‘ration, allowance of food’ < L uita ‘life’, perhaps influenced by L pitantia ‘ration, allowance of food’]; 4. pluc ‘large, round mass’ [pluc 'distended cheek’ > ‘large round mass’ (vs. DIL P-192.1) is onomatopoeic in origin]; 5. Further discussion and some conclusions; also discusses prapp ‘quick, rapid, sudden’ [onomatopoeic], pattu ‘hare’ [cognate with W pathew ‘dormouse’], scatán [related to Germanic words], ciotóg [OIr. *ciutt related to W chwith ‘left’, chwithig ‘awkward’], partán [defends connection with partaing ‘crimson (Parthian) red’; was not borrowed from Partraige ‘Crab People’; suggests a derivation involving part- ‘side’, with original meaning of ‘sideling’ in reference to the crab’s practice of walking sideways].
Schrijver (P.) (ref.)
2575.
Schrijver (Peter): Varia: I. More on non-Indo-European surviving in Ireland in the first millennium ad.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 137–144.
partán, Partraige; ad G. Isaac, in Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 151-153; cf. P. Schrijver, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 195-199.

Further non-Indo-European etyma discussed include: pell/fell, petta, pít/fít, pluc/prapp, patu/pata, scatán, ciotóg.

scáterc

873.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. ON skiggsjá: OIr. scáterc ‘mirror’.
In Ériu 35 (1984), p. 195.
OIr. scáterc from scáth ‘shadow’ + derc ‘eye’.

scáth

1741.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Ainmfhocail i ndíchomhréir.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 119–121.
barr, caoi, faitíos, feadh, grá, leisce, nós, scáth.
873.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. ON skiggsjá: OIr. scáterc ‘mirror’.
In Ériu 35 (1984), p. 195.
OIr. scáterc from scáth ‘shadow’ + derc ‘eye’.

scé

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

Sceilg

3393.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings IV: Is Sceillec Old Norse?
In Peritia 13 (1999), pp. 310–311.
vs M. Oftedal's explanation (in Viking congress 7, pp. 125-133) as a Norse borrowing.

Sceillec

3393.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings IV: Is Sceillec Old Norse?
In Peritia 13 (1999), pp. 310–311.
vs M. Oftedal's explanation (in Viking congress 7, pp. 125-133) as a Norse borrowing.

sceillig

3393.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings IV: Is Sceillec Old Norse?
In Peritia 13 (1999), pp. 310–311.
vs M. Oftedal's explanation (in Viking congress 7, pp. 125-133) as a Norse borrowing.

scél

11411.
Thomsett (Harriet): Meeting on whose terms? The equation of Latin and vernacular literary terminology in the Old Irish glosses.
In Quaestio insularis 3 (2002), pp. 107–120.
On the association of OIr. stoir, argamaint, scél, with L historia, argumentum, fabula in the Old Irish glosses.
12946.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Scél lem dúib: scéal scéal.
In Aistí ag iompar scéil (2004), pp. 21–36.

sceota

3244.
Sharpe (Richard): Latin and Irish words for ‘book-satchel’.
In Peritia 4 (1985), pp. 152–156.
On OIr. tiag (< Lat. theca) and Hib.-Lat. scetha (< Late Lat. scheda).

scetha (Hib.-Lat.)

3244.
Sharpe (Richard): Latin and Irish words for ‘book-satchel’.
In Peritia 4 (1985), pp. 152–156.
On OIr. tiag (< Lat. theca) and Hib.-Lat. scetha (< Late Lat. scheda).

sciam

6925.
Meyer (Robert T.): Old Irish rhetorical terms in the Milan glosses.
In Word 28/1-2 (1976), pp. 110–116.
1. bestindrim; 2. dolbud; 3. ecosc; 4. figair, fiugar; 5. fuath; 6. iroin; 7. metaforde, metaforecde; 8. sciam; 9. trop; 10. tropdae; 11. tropdaid.

scían

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

scibid

2796.
Schrijver (Peter): The etymology of Welsh chwith and the semantics and morphology of PIE *k(w)sweibh-.
In Yr hen iaith (2003), pp. 1–23.
Dissociates Ir. citt- (EModIr. cittach) from W chwith and establishes that MIr. scibid is the genuine cognate.

scipéad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

sciúrtóg

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

sclábhaíocht choiteann (associated terms)

513.
Ní Shéaghdha (Nessa): Gairmeacha beatha roinnt scríobhaithe ón 18ú agus ón 19ú céad.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 567–575.
Arranged in five groups: 1. Múinteoireacht; 2. Ceardaíocht; 3. Obair thalmhaíochta; 4. Sclábhaíocht choiteann; 5. Gnó. With Innéacs Téarmaí.

Scóin

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

Scóinn

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

scoltaid

3636.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Studies in Celtic and Indo-European verbal morphology: 3. W hollt, Br. faouta vs. OIr. scoltaid and similar forms.
In StC 26–27 (1991–1992), pp. 3–6.

Scone (Perthshire)

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

Scot

5450.
Hammond (Matthew M.): The use of the name Scot in the central Middle Ages.
In JSNS 1 (2007), pp. 37–60; 7 (2012), pp. 11-50.
Part 1: Scot as a by-name; Part 2: Scot as a surname, north of the Firth of Forth.

scoth

10772.
Corthals (Johan): Zur Bedeutung und Etymologie von altirisch scothroscad und fásach.
In HS 117 (2004), pp. 105–117.

Scothíne, St.

5156.
Herbert (Máire): The legend of St. Scothíne: perspectives from early Christian Ireland.
In StH 31 (2000–2001), pp. 27–35.
Examines in particular evidence from Félire Óengusso and its 12th c. commentary.

Scotti

1309.
Baumgarten (Rolf): A Hiberno-Isidorian etymology.
In Peritia 2 (1983), pp. 225–228.
A medieval etymology of Scotti from the Lebor Gabála.

Scot(t)us (Lat)

5450.
Hammond (Matthew M.): The use of the name Scot in the central Middle Ages.
In JSNS 1 (2007), pp. 37–60; 7 (2012), pp. 11-50.
Part 1: Scot as a by-name; Part 2: Scot as a surname, north of the Firth of Forth.

Scrahan

1959.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): Cill Mhura agus Screathan.
In Éigse 27 (1993), p. 58.
On the identification of Kilvoro; ad D. Ó Muirithe, in Éigse 24 (1993), pp. 68-70.

scread

7462.
Ó Máille (T. S.): Seacht sanasáin Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Fs. de Bhaldraithe (1986), pp. 36–47.
1. as éadan; 2. bosca/boiscín; 3. carca, cargadh; 4.criss cross; 5. dristiúirí; 6. fiúigil, -ín; 7. scread maidne.

scread maidne

7462.
Ó Máille (T. S.): Seacht sanasáin Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Fs. de Bhaldraithe (1986), pp. 36–47.
1. as éadan; 2. bosca/boiscín; 3. carca, cargadh; 4.criss cross; 5. dristiúirí; 6. fiúigil, -ín; 7. scread maidne.

screamh

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

screapall

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

Screathan

1959.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): Cill Mhura agus Screathan.
In Éigse 27 (1993), p. 58.
On the identification of Kilvoro; ad D. Ó Muirithe, in Éigse 24 (1993), pp. 68-70.

screpal

2661.
McLeod (Neil): Interpreting early Irish law: status and currency. Part 2.
In ZCP 42 (1987), pp. 41–115.
Reconstructs the honour-prices corresponding to the previously discussed grades and examines the units of currency used in payments.

Continued from ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 46-65.

scríbneoir

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

scrúdann

1269.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. 2. scrúdann.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 200–201.
Can mean (i) ‘move with pity’; (ii) ‘torment(ed) with hunger, cold, etc.'.

Scuit

5042.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Nationality names in the Irish annals.
In Nomina 16 (1992–1993), pp. 49–70.
Discusses the terms Ériu, Féni, Scotti, Goídil, Cruthin, Picti, Albu, Bretain, Angli, Saxain, Frainc, Geinti, Gaill, Gall-Ghaedhil, Nordmainn, Lochlainn, Danair.

sda (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.
1488.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta II.
In Éigse 14/4 (Geimhreadh 1972), pp. 265–268.
[1.] Focail árithe i gcomhardadh (:é, :í, etc.); [2.] Droichead uama. Part [I] in Éigse 14/3 (1972), pp. 207-214; part III in Éigse 15/2 (1973), pp. 89-92.
18342.
Viredaz (Rémy): ‘Six’ en indo-européen.
In IF 102 (1997), pp. 112–150.
§7.2 Celtique [Vieil irlandais ].

se

3014.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 5. Das altirische Verbalpräfix nu/no.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 35–59.
Criticises the doctrine that links Old Irish preverbs no-, to/do- with the Hittite ‘sentence connectives’ and proposes alternative etymologies based on their Basque and Amazigh typological parallels, among others.

seacha

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

seachtain

1711.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ní íosfainn seachtain é.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 371–378.
[1.] On the use of indefinite nouns with time reference as adverbs meaning ‘over a period of …', e.g. seachtain, , bliain, , coicís in negative contexts in the Irish of An Cheathrú Rua; [2.] i leith an bóthar: on the adverbial use of the nominative of definite nouns following certain compound and nominal prepositions preceded by verbs of motion, e.g. ar aghaidh, i ngiorracht, i leith, timpeall, treasna; [3.] Tá sé ag dul Gaillimh: on the ‘elision’ of the preposition go before place-names.

-seadar (ScG)

4294.
Cox (Richard A. V.): The origin and relative chronology of shader-names in the Hebrides.
In SGS 16 (1990), pp. 95–113.
Argues that shader-names derive from ON sǽtr only, and suggests a revision of the traditional relative chronology of the Norse place-name elements in the West of Scotland.

seadh

1357.
Breeze (Andrew): Scots shayth ‘reason’ and Gaelic seadh ‘esteem’.
In SGS 21 (2003), pp. 251–252.
17991.
Weiss (Michael): An Italo-Celtic divinity and a common Sabellic sound change.
In ClAnt 36/2 (Oct. 2017), pp. 370–389.
Argues Lat. theonym Sēmō is connected to a Proto-Celtic *Segomū (> Gaul. Segomoni, Og. segamanas, OIr. (Nia) Segamon), positing a Proto-Italo-Celtic *seĝhomōn- ‘strong one,' ‘strongman’ (< PIE * √seĝh- ‘hold firmly,' etc.).

seagair (ScG)

3707.
Lockwood (W. B.): Some Gaelic etymologies.
In SGS 12/1 (Sep. 1971), pp. 22–29.
Bird-names: buna-bhuachaill, carara, goillir, seagair, trilleachan.

seagh (ScG)

1357.
Breeze (Andrew): Scots shayth ‘reason’ and Gaelic seadh ‘esteem’.
In SGS 21 (2003), pp. 251–252.

Seagoe

2355.
Adams (G. B.): BUPNS reprints 20: Place-name phonology: the name Seagoe and the anglicisation of Irish sibilants.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 195–196.
Repr. from BUPNS 2/2 (Summer, 1954), pp. 30-31.

sean-

4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.

seanchas

1315.
Breatnach (Pádraig A.): The methodology of seanchas: the redaction by Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh of the chronicle poem Leanam croinic clann nDálaigh.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 1–18.
A comparative analysis of Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh’s redaction of the poem (found in MSS RIA 24 P 27, RIA A v 1, NLI G 167) with that of ‘its original form as drafted by Dubhthach Óg Ó Duibhgeannáin’ (in MS ULC Add. 3084) in honour of Aodh Ruadh Ó Domhnaill. Redactor identified as Cú Choigcríche mac Diarmada Ó Cléirigh, one of the Four Masters.

seangán

3746.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge zur vergleichenden Erforschung des Irischen: 6. Zur Etymologie von ir. seangán ‘Ameise’.
In Celtica 11 (1976), p. 268.
Suggests it may be a substratum word, cf. Basque txingurri.

seann- (ScG)

4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.

seantuine

10411.
MacNeill (Máire): Poll na Seantuinne and Poll Tigh Liabáin.
In Béaloideas 39–41 (1971–1973), pp. 206–211.

seasamh (ina sheasamh)

1565.
McGonagle (Noel): Three Ulster features.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
1. Lenition after iongantach [and millteanach]; 2. i bhfus: On the development from adverb to quaisi-imperative: 'here’ > 'give me’; 3. Tá mé ina shuidhe: On the generalisation of 3rd masc. poss. in ina shuidhe, ina sheasamh, etc. in Ulster and Man.

seastán

12452.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí: II. Dhá fhocal.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 296–297.
1. stán; 2. *clódhghalar.

sebortir

10713.
Hamp (Eric P.): IE *su̯ergh-.
In IF 79 (1974), pp. 154–155.
On OIr. sebortir (fut. of seircid).

sech

3014.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 5. Das altirische Verbalpräfix nu/no.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 35–59.
Criticises the doctrine that links Old Irish preverbs no-, to/do- with the Hittite ‘sentence connectives’ and proposes alternative etymologies based on their Basque and Amazigh typological parallels, among others.
3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.

sech-

4170.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 8. sech- ‘cut’.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 183.
On the functions of M. Dillon’s ‘empty’ to- in tescaid.

sechid

3460.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 3. *sekw- ‘pronounce, speak’.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 171–174.
(a) *fo ·aisci, do ·fāisce: ad J. Carney's discussion of fásc ‘announcement’ and tásc ‘tidings received’, in Ériu 18 (1958), p. 34 (cf. BILL III: 5527); (b) tinchosc, tecosc: more on derivatives of sechid, including écosc; (c) sich ‘said’: ad J. Carney, ibid., p. 14 §13c, read sích.

sechmo ·ella

3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.

Sechnall

11536.
Dumville (David N.): Auxilius, Iserninus, Secundinus, and Benignus.
In Saint Patrick 493-1993 (1993), pp. 89–105.

sechtarét

3298.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 7. sechtarét Sg. 67b21.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 174–175.

sechtordd

1736.
Quin (E. G.): Textual notes: [1.] A passage in Táin bó Fraích.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 93–94.
On the readings sechtordd and timchellad in the description of Ailill and Medb’s house, §7 (ll. 65ff as ed. by W. Meid 1970 [BILL 4991]).

secnap

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

sed

3152.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 87–90.
1. sál; 2. sed; 3. slabar; 4. slice; 5. ta-; 6. tadg, tál; 7. tarr, torrach; 8. tinaid; 9. tindabrad, Findabair; 10. úall, úabar, úais; 11. *u̯ernā?, fern.
17991.
Weiss (Michael): An Italo-Celtic divinity and a common Sabellic sound change.
In ClAnt 36/2 (Oct. 2017), pp. 370–389.
Argues Lat. theonym Sēmō is connected to a Proto-Celtic *Segomū (> Gaul. Segomoni, Og. segamanas, OIr. (Nia) Segamon), positing a Proto-Italo-Celtic *seĝhomōn- ‘strong one,' ‘strongman’ (< PIE * √seĝh- ‘hold firmly,' etc.).

séd

15458.
Blažek (Václav): Celtic ‘deer’.
In ÉtC 41 (2015), pp. 121–127.
On the etym. of MIr. ség, séd.

sedguine

822.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: IV. 1. On the agent suffix -e in Irish.
In Ériu 34 (1983), p. 194.
áugaire, úgaire, óegaire, Bóguine, ráthbuige, sedguine, corrguine, cuthchaire, cáinte.

Seefin

18375.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth), Hennessy (Ronan): Finn’s Seat: topographies of power and royal marchlands of Gaelic polities in medieval Ireland.
In LH 38/2 (2017), pp. 29–62.
Investigates hilltop cairns and mounds named Suidhe Finn which were used as boundary landmarks. Includes a case study of the landscape of the hill of Almhain and its summit mound of Suidhe Finn in North Leinster.

ség

15458.
Blažek (Václav): Celtic ‘deer’.
In ÉtC 41 (2015), pp. 121–127.
On the etym. of MIr. ség, séd.

seg

17991.
Weiss (Michael): An Italo-Celtic divinity and a common Sabellic sound change.
In ClAnt 36/2 (Oct. 2017), pp. 370–389.
Argues Lat. theonym Sēmō is connected to a Proto-Celtic *Segomū (> Gaul. Segomoni, Og. segamanas, OIr. (Nia) Segamon), positing a Proto-Italo-Celtic *seĝhomōn- ‘strong one,' ‘strongman’ (< PIE * √seĝh- ‘hold firmly,' etc.).

Segais (hazels of)

778.
Breatnach (Liam): The Caldron of Poesy.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 45–93.
Ed. with diplomatic and restored texts (incl. glosses on text) on the three cauldrons of poesy, Coire Goiriath, Coire Érmai, Coire Soḟis from MS TCD H 3. 18 with Engl. transl. and notes. Begins with Moí coire coir Goiriath. Discussion of linguistic dating and metrics. Includes index of names and principal notes. Appendix with ed. of text on the hazels of Segais (cuill na Segsa) from MS NLI G 10.

Add. et corr. in Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 189-191.

*Segam

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

segamanas (Og)

17991.
Weiss (Michael): An Italo-Celtic divinity and a common Sabellic sound change.
In ClAnt 36/2 (Oct. 2017), pp. 370–389.
Argues Lat. theonym Sēmō is connected to a Proto-Celtic *Segomū (> Gaul. Segomoni, Og. segamanas, OIr. (Nia) Segamon), positing a Proto-Italo-Celtic *seĝhomōn- ‘strong one,' ‘strongman’ (< PIE * √seĝh- ‘hold firmly,' etc.).

Segamu

17991.
Weiss (Michael): An Italo-Celtic divinity and a common Sabellic sound change.
In ClAnt 36/2 (Oct. 2017), pp. 370–389.
Argues Lat. theonym Sēmō is connected to a Proto-Celtic *Segomū (> Gaul. Segomoni, Og. segamanas, OIr. (Nia) Segamon), positing a Proto-Italo-Celtic *seĝhomōn- ‘strong one,' ‘strongman’ (< PIE * √seĝh- ‘hold firmly,' etc.).

segda

4165.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 13. segda ‘fortunate’.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 184.

Sego-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

seiche

890.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 7. se(i)che ‘skin’.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 183.

seichid

1029.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: VI. 2. The preterite of sichid/seichid ‘says’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 191–192.
ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 5 (1960), pp. 80-81. 3 sg. rel. sı̄che attested in an Old Irish gloss in Cáin Ḟuithirbe.
Binchy (D. A.) (ref.)

seichithir

6957.
Baldi (Philip): Indo-European *sekw.
In JIES 2/1 (Spring 1974), pp. 77–86.
On OIr. seichithir.

seicne

674.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 1. Ceciderunt ab oculis eius tamquam squamae.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 175–178.
Discusses a number of Irish words for ‘scale’, ‘film’, ‘skin’, etc., incl. lann, bloesc (blaosc, plaosc), scánnán, seicne, scam(h)a, scam(h)ach, scamhadh, scamh, screamh, scamall, scamhal, fachail; also ad. D. Greene, in Celtica 4 (1958), p. 45 (BILL 1613).
Greene (David) (ref.)

seilind

16746.
Schrijver (Peter): Welsh heledd, hêl, Cornish *heyl, 'Latin’ helinium, Dutch hel-, zeelt.
In NOWELE 26 (1995), pp. 31–42.

seinm

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

Seir

1037.
Carey (John): The Irish vision of the Chinese.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 73–79.
vs. DIL s.v. Seiria ‘Syria’, Seiricda ‘Syrian’. Ir. Seiria, Seiricda, and Serdae derive from L Sēres (nom. pl.), Sēricus (adj.) ‘Chinese’; also on Seir, son of Adam, whose descendants survived the Flood.

seir

1490.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 14/4 (Geimhreadh 1972), pp. 275–282.
1. cómhrac i dtóin [and gáir faoi tholl]; 2. fochraí (an) lae [< fochroíb; cf. also forcraid, fortraid; for variation in similar clusters, cf. M. A. O’Brien, in Celtica 2/2 (1954), p. 353]; 3. feiste [‘entertainment’; feist, eisteas, feisteas; 4. crioslach [crioslaí pl.]; 5. seir; 6. paidir chapaill; 7. púirín; 8. is () luar liom [luar < lú orm]; 9. tɑ: tu: tau [togha].
O’Brien (M. A.) (ref.)

seir ‘heel’

2973.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 11. OIr. seir, Welsh ffer, Ir. sírid; OIr. seirig.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 141–142.

seircid

10197.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): IE *serg(h)- ‘waste away, be sick’.
In IF 98 (1993), pp. 48–54.
OIr. seirg, seircid.

Republ. in Lindeman studies, pp. 200-204.
10713.
Hamp (Eric P.): IE *su̯ergh-.
In IF 79 (1974), pp. 154–155.
On OIr. sebortir (fut. of seircid).

seirg

10197.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): IE *serg(h)- ‘waste away, be sick’.
In IF 98 (1993), pp. 48–54.
OIr. seirg, seircid.

Republ. in Lindeman studies, pp. 200-204.

Seiria

1037.
Carey (John): The Irish vision of the Chinese.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 73–79.
vs. DIL s.v. Seiria ‘Syria’, Seiricda ‘Syrian’. Ir. Seiria, Seiricda, and Serdae derive from L Sēres (nom. pl.), Sēricus (adj.) ‘Chinese’; also on Seir, son of Adam, whose descendants survived the Flood.

Seiricda

1037.
Carey (John): The Irish vision of the Chinese.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 73–79.
vs. DIL s.v. Seiria ‘Syria’, Seiricda ‘Syrian’. Ir. Seiria, Seiricda, and Serdae derive from L Sēres (nom. pl.), Sēricus (adj.) ‘Chinese’; also on Seir, son of Adam, whose descendants survived the Flood.

seirig

2973.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 11. OIr. seir, Welsh ffer, Ir. sírid; OIr. seirig.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 141–142.

sèis

1339.
Heath (Julie): Liberty and tradition: sound patterning in Hebridean prayer and preaching as poetic device and linguistic sign.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 25–33.
1. Introduction; 2. Sound patterning as poetic device: (a) The line; (b) sèis, Cultural Resonances, and Linguistic Reinforcement; 3. Sound patterning as linguistic sign; 4. Conclusion.

seis

490.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): A note on a difficult passage in Bretha Déin Chécht.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 252–252.
ad Bretha Déin Chécht, §36.
3793.
Hamp (Eric P.): Archaisms in Old Irish noun inflection.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 61–64.
Searches for traces of old case forms (specially instrumental, locative) in the Old Irish nominal inflection.

séis

16890.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): The expression of “sense, meaning, signification” in the Old Irish glosses, and particularly in the Milan and Saint Gall glosses.
In Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg (2016), pp. 85–100.
Discusses the use and meaning of OIr. terms for semantic concepts, such as séis, sians/séns, intliucht, cíall, and inne.

seithe

890.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 7. se(i)che ‘skin’.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 183.

*sek-

677.
Watkins (Calvert): Sick-maintenance in Indo-European.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 21–25.
OIr. socht ‘stupor’ originally denoted a pathological state or variety of ‘sickness’; derivation from *sóktos from root *sek- ‘dryness’.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 560-564.

*sekw-

3460.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 3. *sekw- ‘pronounce, speak’.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 171–174.
(a) *fo ·aisci, do ·fāisce: ad J. Carney's discussion of fásc ‘announcement’ and tásc ‘tidings received’, in Ériu 18 (1958), p. 34 (cf. BILL III: 5527); (b) tinchosc, tecosc: more on derivatives of sechid, including écosc; (c) sich ‘said’: ad J. Carney, ibid., p. 14 §13c, read sích.

sel-

10019.
Hamp (Eric P.): (Western) Indo-European *sel- ‘move’.
In MSS 41 (1982), pp. 49–59.
OIr. sel- and derivatives (LEIA S-78).

selan

14003.
Pyysalo (Jouna Olavi): Ten new etymologies between the Old Anatolian and the Celtic languages.
In SCF 11 (2014), pp. 48–66.
1. Hitt. ḫap- ‘reichlich vorhanden sein’: OIr. ana- ‘richness, property’; 2. Hitt. šinura- ‘mittellos, arm’: OIr. sēna- ‘nier, désavouer, rejeter’; 3. CLu. manai- `(beschreibt Vorratskörbe)': OIr. meinistir- (f.) ‘coffre contenant les ustensiles du culte’, 4. Hitt. mani- ‘Eiter’: OIr. mein·bligi- (pr.) ‘il foisonne, il fourmille’; 5. Hitt. maniti- ‘Wachstum (?)': OIr. muine ‘Berg’; 6. CLu. nani- ‘reinigen’: MIr. cruth·necht ‘roter Weizen’; 7. Hitt. ninga- ‘Regen’: OIr. nin- ‘cloud, wave’; 8. Hitt. KUŠšala- ‘Teil des Zaumzeugs’: OIr. selan- ‘corde, laisse de chien’; 9. Hitt. šant- ‘wertwolles Gegenstand’: OIr. sét- ‘trésor’; 10. Hitt. da- ‘all, ganz, gesamt’: OIr. ‘in full’.

seland

16746.
Schrijver (Peter): Welsh heledd, hêl, Cornish *heyl, 'Latin’ helinium, Dutch hel-, zeelt.
In NOWELE 26 (1995), pp. 31–42.

selann

16746.
Schrijver (Peter): Welsh heledd, hêl, Cornish *heyl, 'Latin’ helinium, Dutch hel-, zeelt.
In NOWELE 26 (1995), pp. 31–42.

selas

3377.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Meyer to Gaidoz: an emendation between friends.
In Peritia 15 (2001), p. 378.
ad p. 20.17, as ed. by Kuno Meyer 1902 (Best1, p. 118).

Selbach

4361.
Dumville (David N.): Gaelic and other Celtic names in the ninth-century ‘Northumbrian Liber Vitae': some issues and implications.
In SGS 22 (2006), pp. 1–25.
Identifies and discusses personal names of certain or arguable Irish origin (Abniar, Adamnan, Bressal, Brón, Denma, Dengus, Faelfi, Fergus, Finan, Fladgus, Reachtchriðe, Salfach, Ultan; Cuna, Cunen, Honoc, Maethcor, Mucca, Ona, Onboth).

selos

3377.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Meyer to Gaidoz: an emendation between friends.
In Peritia 15 (2001), p. 378.
ad p. 20.17, as ed. by Kuno Meyer 1902 (Best1, p. 118).

sénaid

14003.
Pyysalo (Jouna Olavi): Ten new etymologies between the Old Anatolian and the Celtic languages.
In SCF 11 (2014), pp. 48–66.
1. Hitt. ḫap- ‘reichlich vorhanden sein’: OIr. ana- ‘richness, property’; 2. Hitt. šinura- ‘mittellos, arm’: OIr. sēna- ‘nier, désavouer, rejeter’; 3. CLu. manai- `(beschreibt Vorratskörbe)': OIr. meinistir- (f.) ‘coffre contenant les ustensiles du culte’, 4. Hitt. mani- ‘Eiter’: OIr. mein·bligi- (pr.) ‘il foisonne, il fourmille’; 5. Hitt. maniti- ‘Wachstum (?)': OIr. muine ‘Berg’; 6. CLu. nani- ‘reinigen’: MIr. cruth·necht ‘roter Weizen’; 7. Hitt. ninga- ‘Regen’: OIr. nin- ‘cloud, wave’; 8. Hitt. KUŠšala- ‘Teil des Zaumzeugs’: OIr. selan- ‘corde, laisse de chien’; 9. Hitt. šant- ‘wertwolles Gegenstand’: OIr. sét- ‘trésor’; 10. Hitt. da- ‘all, ganz, gesamt’: OIr. ‘in full’.

Sénán

2264.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): Some bogus Irish saints.
In Ainm 3 (1988), pp. 1–8.
Anesus (Nesus), Bríg, Ciar, Conchliath, Damán, Feilic, Feimme, Medrán, Meic Mochoba, Modiúit (Modút), Ródán, Sénán, Sillán, T’eolas.

Senán, St.

2526.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Creative medieval etymology and Irish hagiography (Lasair, Columba, Senán).
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 49–78.
Outlines the Isidorian etymological methodology and illustrates its application in Irish scholarship with four examples from Irish hagiography.

Sencha

11892.
Sayers (William): Soundboxes of the divine: Hœnir, Sencha, Gwalchmai.
In ManQ 33/1 (Fall 1992), pp. 57–67.

senchae

629.
McCone (Kim): OIr. senchae, senchaid and preliminaries on agent noun formation in Celtic.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 1–10.
ad F. Kelly, in Peritia 5 (1986), 74-106. Senchae derives from a compound *seno-kwois(y?)os, meaning ‘old witness’. Senchas represents senchae + abstract suffix -as.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)

senchaid

629.
McCone (Kim): OIr. senchae, senchaid and preliminaries on agent noun formation in Celtic.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 1–10.
ad F. Kelly, in Peritia 5 (1986), 74-106. Senchae derives from a compound *seno-kwois(y?)os, meaning ‘old witness’. Senchas represents senchae + abstract suffix -as.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)
14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

senchas

629.
McCone (Kim): OIr. senchae, senchaid and preliminaries on agent noun formation in Celtic.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 1–10.
ad F. Kelly, in Peritia 5 (1986), 74-106. Senchae derives from a compound *seno-kwois(y?)os, meaning ‘old witness’. Senchas represents senchae + abstract suffix -as.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)
13391.
Byrne (Francis John): Senchas: the nature of Gaelic historical tradition.
In HSt, 9 (1974), pp. 137–159.

Senchell Dumaigi

8695.
Nicholls (K. W.): Some Patrician sites of Eastern Connacht.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 114–118.
Senchell Dumaigi; Sendomnach; Ardsenlis; Druime.

Sendomnach

8695.
Nicholls (K. W.): Some Patrician sites of Eastern Connacht.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 114–118.
Senchell Dumaigi; Sendomnach; Ardsenlis; Druime.

senóir

2839.
West (Máire): Aspects of díberg in the tale Togail bruidne Da Derga.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 950–964.
Explores general concepts about the early Irish institution of brigandage within the context of Togail bruidne Da Derga, with special attention to its association with wolflike activities, and argues that the tale conveys the Christian condemnation of díberg.

*seno-kwois

629.
McCone (Kim): OIr. senchae, senchaid and preliminaries on agent noun formation in Celtic.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 1–10.
ad F. Kelly, in Peritia 5 (1986), 74-106. Senchae derives from a compound *seno-kwois(y?)os, meaning ‘old witness’. Senchas represents senchae + abstract suffix -as.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)

séns

16890.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): The expression of “sense, meaning, signification” in the Old Irish glosses, and particularly in the Milan and Saint Gall glosses.
In Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg (2016), pp. 85–100.
Discusses the use and meaning of OIr. terms for semantic concepts, such as séis, sians/séns, intliucht, cíall, and inne.

seó

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

seo (ag seo)

1566.
Breatnach (R. A.): An gléas teaspáinteach.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
ag seo, ag sin.

se(o)id

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

séol

11966.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): On Indo-European roads.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 299–341.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms áth, belach, bóthar, casán, conar, drochet, éol, rith, sét, séol, slige.

septecim

4143.
Bisagni (Jacopo), Warntjes (Immo): Latin and Old Irish in the Munich Computus: a reassessment and further evidence.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 1–33.
Offers an analysis of all the instances of code-switching in MS München, Clm 14456.

serb

682.
Watkins (Calvert): Varia: I. 1. A Hittite-Celtic etymology.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 116–119.
OIr. serb (ā f) ‘theft’ is compared to Hitt. šāru ‘booty’.
2645.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Irish serb = Welsh herw.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 276–277.
ad C. Watkins, in Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 116-122.

·serba

2645.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Irish serb = Welsh herw.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 276–277.
ad C. Watkins, in Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 116-122.

serbaid

9521.
Breatnach (Liam): Miscellanea Hibernica.
In A companion in linguistics [Fs. Ahlqvist] (2005), pp. 141–151.
1. Old Irish tráigid; 2. The simplex serbaid; 3. do-maisi and a detail of syncope.

serc

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].
11707.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Serc mór do Macc Maire.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 935–959.
Examines the syntax of the word serc in early Irish.

sercc

17531.
Meid (Wolfgang): ‘Freundschaft’ und 'Liebe’ in keltischen Sprachen.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 255–263.
Etym. of OIr. carae, cairde, sercc, grád, etc.

sercol

386.
Eska (Joseph): OIr. sercol.
In Celtica 17 (1985), pp. 53–58.
< L ferculum.

Serdae

1037.
Carey (John): The Irish vision of the Chinese.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 73–79.
vs. DIL s.v. Seiria ‘Syria’, Seiricda ‘Syrian’. Ir. Seiria, Seiricda, and Serdae derive from L Sēres (nom. pl.), Sēricus (adj.) ‘Chinese’; also on Seir, son of Adam, whose descendants survived the Flood.

Sēres (Lat)

1037.
Carey (John): The Irish vision of the Chinese.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 73–79.
vs. DIL s.v. Seiria ‘Syria’, Seiricda ‘Syrian’. Ir. Seiria, Seiricda, and Serdae derive from L Sēres (nom. pl.), Sēricus (adj.) ‘Chinese’; also on Seir, son of Adam, whose descendants survived the Flood.

sergaid

10713.
Hamp (Eric P.): IE *su̯ergh-.
In IF 79 (1974), pp. 154–155.
On OIr. sebortir (fut. of seircid).

Sēricus (Lat)

1037.
Carey (John): The Irish vision of the Chinese.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 73–79.
vs. DIL s.v. Seiria ‘Syria’, Seiricda ‘Syrian’. Ir. Seiria, Seiricda, and Serdae derive from L Sēres (nom. pl.), Sēricus (adj.) ‘Chinese’; also on Seir, son of Adam, whose descendants survived the Flood.

sernaid

10522.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On the origin of the Old Irish present -men ‘fixes’.
In ZCP 58 (2011), pp. 45–54.
On the reconstruction of the Common Celtic present indicative stems underlying OIr. do-dímen and sernaid.
11805.
Hill (Eugen): Silbische Liquiden vor Nasalen im Inselkeltischen und das Problem der Nasalpräntien vom Typ air. sernaid, kymr. -sarnu.
In KF 5 (2010–2012), pp. 157–184.
Discusses the continuation in Insular Celtic of the PIE nasal presents made to roots in final laryngeal (exemplified by OIr. sernaid, ernaid, marnaid, ·cella, ·ella, -t·baill, ·gnin).

-sernn

1233.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. 1. On the root vocalisms of Old Irish -sernn.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 163–167.
ad C. Marstrander, Observations sur les présents indo-européens à nasale infixée en celtique, 1924 (Best2 624).

serrach

13978.
Kelly (Patricia): The earliest words for ‘horse’ in the Celtic languages.
In Horse in Celtic culture (1997), pp. 43–63.
Generic terms: 1. OIr. ech; 2. W march, OIr. marc; 3. MW cafall, ceffyl, caffon, OIr. capall; 4. W gorwydd; 5. W eddystyr [OIr. adastar]; 6. OIr. gabor; 7. mandu? [MIr. menn]. ‘Stallion’ [OIr. caullach, etc.]. ‘Gelding’ [OIr. meile]. ‘Mare’ [OIr. láir]. ‘Foal’ [OIr. lurchaire; OIr. serrach].

Sescenn Uairbhéoil

2180.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): The Irish geography of Culhwch and Olwen.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [Fs. Carney] (1989), pp. 412–426.
Argues that the Uarbél (‘Cold Gap’) contained in Esgair Oeruel may be identified with Windgates in Co. Wicklow, and that Tir Ga[r]mon is a reference to Loch Garman.

sét

1441.
McLeod (Neil): Di ércib fola.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 123–216.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] The dubious evidence for a bánbéim of three séts; [3.] The three-sét single-symptom blow (c. AD 650?); [4.] The demise of the three-sét single-symptom blow (from c. AD 675?); [5.] The rise of the two-and-a-half-sét single-symptom blow (c. AD 697?); [6.] The early commentaries (from c. AD 1000?); [7.] Subsequent commentaries (from c. AD 1100); [8.] Later developments; [9.] Crólige cumaile and the seven-sét bandage-wound; [10.] An edition of DEF [normalised with transl. based on the various texts in CIH]; [11.] The commentaries; [12.] Legal procedure in injury cases; [12.] Dating the commentaries; [13.] The MS traditions; [14.] The complilation of MS A; [15.] The relationship between the MSS; [16.] The common material; [17.] Other sources; [18.] An edition of the commentaries to DEF [normalised with transl.]. Incl. brief index to lexical notes.
2661.
McLeod (Neil): Interpreting early Irish law: status and currency. Part 2.
In ZCP 42 (1987), pp. 41–115.
Reconstructs the honour-prices corresponding to the previously discussed grades and examines the units of currency used in payments.

Continued from ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 46-65.

5648.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): Bréagfhoirmeacha, tét agus tét cliss, i dTochmharc Eimhire.
In Ildánach ildírech [Fs. Mac Cana] (1999), pp. 169–179.
tét/téit, sét, cliss, tétchless.
11966.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): On Indo-European roads.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 299–341.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms áth, belach, bóthar, casán, conar, drochet, éol, rith, sét, séol, slige.
14003.
Pyysalo (Jouna Olavi): Ten new etymologies between the Old Anatolian and the Celtic languages.
In SCF 11 (2014), pp. 48–66.
1. Hitt. ḫap- ‘reichlich vorhanden sein’: OIr. ana- ‘richness, property’; 2. Hitt. šinura- ‘mittellos, arm’: OIr. sēna- ‘nier, désavouer, rejeter’; 3. CLu. manai- `(beschreibt Vorratskörbe)': OIr. meinistir- (f.) ‘coffre contenant les ustensiles du culte’, 4. Hitt. mani- ‘Eiter’: OIr. mein·bligi- (pr.) ‘il foisonne, il fourmille’; 5. Hitt. maniti- ‘Wachstum (?)': OIr. muine ‘Berg’; 6. CLu. nani- ‘reinigen’: MIr. cruth·necht ‘roter Weizen’; 7. Hitt. ninga- ‘Regen’: OIr. nin- ‘cloud, wave’; 8. Hitt. KUŠšala- ‘Teil des Zaumzeugs’: OIr. selan- ‘corde, laisse de chien’; 9. Hitt. šant- ‘wertwolles Gegenstand’: OIr. sét- ‘trésor’; 10. Hitt. da- ‘all, ganz, gesamt’: OIr. ‘in full’.

sét gairitechta

2476.
Jaski (Bart): Cú Chulainn, gormac and dalta of the Ulstermen.
In CMCS 37 (Summer 1999), pp. 1–31.
Examines the institution of fosterage in early Ireland, focusing on the adoption of Cú Chulainn by Conchobar and the other prominent Ulstermen. Discusses in particular the terms: gormac, dalta, nia, mac fóesma, sét gerta (or gairitechta), orba niad and orba dúthrachta. Cf. T. Ó Cathasaigh, in Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 128-160.

sét gerta

2476.
Jaski (Bart): Cú Chulainn, gormac and dalta of the Ulstermen.
In CMCS 37 (Summer 1999), pp. 1–31.
Examines the institution of fosterage in early Ireland, focusing on the adoption of Cú Chulainn by Conchobar and the other prominent Ulstermen. Discusses in particular the terms: gormac, dalta, nia, mac fóesma, sét gerta (or gairitechta), orba niad and orba dúthrachta. Cf. T. Ó Cathasaigh, in Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 128-160.

Sétanta

2637.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): Heroic destinies in the macgnímrada of Finn and Cú Chulainn.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 23–39.
Outlines the common story pattern underlying the respective macgnímrada.

sgadan (ScG)

2575.
Schrijver (Peter): Varia: I. More on non-Indo-European surviving in Ireland in the first millennium ad.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 137–144.
partán, Partraige; ad G. Isaac, in Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 151-153; cf. P. Schrijver, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 195-199.

Further non-Indo-European etyma discussed include: pell/fell, petta, pít/fít, pluc/prapp, patu/pata, scatán, ciotóg.

sgagadh

1476.
McManus (Damian): The bardic poet as teacher, student and critic: a context for the grammatical tracts.
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 97–123.
On the training of bardic poets; stresses the role of ‘books’. Incl. discussion of associated terminology, e.g. saothrughadh ‘training’, cúrsa saothruighthe ‘a course of study’, duan dheiridh shaothair ‘composition to secure graduation’, sgagadh ‘straining, sifting’, glanadh ‘cleansing’, gleódh ‘purifying’, breithniughadh ‘judging, examining’, oide ‘teacher’.

sgail (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

sgailc (ScG)

4422.
MacDonald (Roderick): A dictionary ramble.
In ScotL 13 (1994), pp. 82–87.
Comments on the possible Gaelic origin of the Scots words skalk, scaulin pyock, skail, polk breik, cateran, brybour, gluntoch/gluntow.

sgàile (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

Sgàin

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

sgairbhíon

3962.
Hughes (A. J.): Ulster Scots gowk storm, Ulster Gaelic (s)gairbhshíon na cuaiche.
In UF 37 (1991), pp. 107–108.

sgaoil (ScG)

4422.
MacDonald (Roderick): A dictionary ramble.
In ScotL 13 (1994), pp. 82–87.
Comments on the possible Gaelic origin of the Scots words skalk, scaulin pyock, skail, polk breik, cateran, brybour, gluntoch/gluntow.
16878.
Meek (Donald E.): The spread of a word: scail in Scots and sgaoil in Gaelic.
In Perspectives on the older Scottish tongue (2005), pp. 84–111.

sgeir (ScG)

13344.
Fraser (Ian A.): Norse and Gaelic coastal terminology in the Western Isles.
In Northern studies 11 (1978), pp. 3–16.

sgiath (ScG) (in place names)

4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

Sgogín

2041.
Williams (N. J. A.): Scoggin in Éirinn.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 182.

sgonn (ScG)

11383.
Sayers (William): Scones, The Oxford English Dictionary, and the Celtic element in English vocabulary.
In N&Q 52/4 (Dec. 2005), pp. 447–450.

sgorr (ScG) (in place names)

4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

sgoth (ScG)

11001.
Cox (Richard A. V.): Old Norse words for ‘boat’ in Scottish Gaelic: revisiting Henderson’s list.
In SGS 24 (2008), pp. 169–180.
George Henderson, The Norse influence on Celtic Scotland (1910), pp. 138-143: 1. bàta; 2. bìrlinn; 3. carbh; 4. càrbhair; 5. cnarra; 6. geòla; 7. sgoth.

Sguab Ghábhaidh

1648.
Meek (Donald E.): The banners of the Fian in Gaelic ballad tradition.
In CMCS 11 (Summer 1986), pp. 29–69.
[1.] Analogues of the banners in Germanic and other cultures; [2.] Banners in Irish tradition outside the fian; [3.] Banners associated with the fian; [4.] The banner quatrains in later tradition (incl. names of banners, e.g. Dealbh Ghréine, Fulang Doghra, Aoincheannach, Dún Naomhtha, Lámh Dhearg, Sguab Ghábhaidh, Lóch Luinneach); [5.] Form and composition of the BDL poem [see [6.]]; [6.] Edition (Poem beg. Naoinear a chuadhm[ar] fá choill, ed. from NLS MS Adv. 72.1.37 (Dean of Lismore’s Bk); with Engl transl. and notes). Figs.

Shader

4294.
Cox (Richard A. V.): The origin and relative chronology of shader-names in the Hebrides.
In SGS 16 (1990), pp. 95–113.
Argues that shader-names derive from ON sǽtr only, and suggests a revision of the traditional relative chronology of the Norse place-name elements in the West of Scotland.

Sheela-na-gig

6775.
Dunn (James H.): Síle na gcíoch.
In Éire-Ireland 12/1 (Spring 1977), pp. 68–85.
6860.
Freitag (Barbara): A new light on the Sheela-na-gig.
In Éire-Ireland 33/3-4–34/1 (Fall/Winter 1998–Spring 1999), pp. 50–69.
Includes a discussion of the name Sheela-na-gig.

Sheen

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Shemoge

7642.
Ó Crualaoich (Conchubhar): Shemoge’s and St. Awarie’s: one case of mistaken identity and one case of sharp intuition?
In The past 27 (2006), pp. 39–49.
On the origin of Díomóg/Modhíomóg of Cluain Caoin Ara and on the Co, Wexford place names St. Imoge or Shemoge, St. Awaries and Lady’s Island.

Shetland

8628.
Lockwood (W. B.): On the early history and origin of the names Orkney and Shetland.
In Namn och bygd 68 (1980), pp. 19–35.

Shimna

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Shiven

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Shrule

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

1488.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta II.
In Éigse 14/4 (Geimhreadh 1972), pp. 265–268.
[1.] Focail árithe i gcomhardadh (:é, :í, etc.); [2.] Droichead uama. Part [I] in Éigse 14/3 (1972), pp. 207-214; part III in Éigse 15/2 (1973), pp. 89-92.
2904.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Note sur le pronom personnel de la 2e personne du pluriel en vieil irlandais.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 567–570.
Republ. in Lindeman studies, pp. 112-115.
9161.
Thompson (Tok): The Irish tradition: connections between the disciplines, and what’s in a word?
In JAMT 10/4 (Dec. 2004), pp. 335–368.

sí ‘fairies’

925.
Ó Madagáin (Breandán): Gaelic lullaby: a charm to protect the baby?
In ScS 29 (1989), pp. 29–38.
Suggests that the original function of lullabies in Ireland and Scotland was to protect the sleeping child from being abducted by the .

sí (pron.)

12889.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Sí.
In Atlantic currents [Ó Catháin essays] (2012), pp. 385–391.
On the non-genetic similarity between Ir. and Engl. she, and a parallel situation in Swedish and Finnish.

sí ‘you (pl.)'

2765.
Shields (Kenneth, Jr.): On the origin of the Celtic first and second person plural personal pronouns in *s-.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 168–180.
Postulates metathesized *sne, *swe (< PIE *n̥s-e, *us-e as the ultimate source of OIr. sní, .

siabhra slaim

1502.
Ó Súilleabháin (Pádraig): Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 22–23.
1. dálach ‘mournful, sad, sorrowful’ in Annals of the Four Masters; 2. slam: siabhra slaim ‘fairy or magic hosts ?' (sic leg. not siabhra Sláini as printed by O’Donovan in his edition of Annals of the Four Masters) ; 3. tiagh: as a tiaghaibh in Annals of Ulster vs. as a ttiaghaibh fearrdha in (unpublished portion of) Annals of the Four Masters.
O’Donovan (John) (ref.)

siabhra Sláini

1502.
Ó Súilleabháin (Pádraig): Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 22–23.
1. dálach ‘mournful, sad, sorrowful’ in Annals of the Four Masters; 2. slam: siabhra slaim ‘fairy or magic hosts ?' (sic leg. not siabhra Sláini as printed by O’Donovan in his edition of Annals of the Four Masters) ; 3. tiagh: as a tiaghaibh in Annals of Ulster vs. as a ttiaghaibh fearrdha in (unpublished portion of) Annals of the Four Masters.
O’Donovan (John) (ref.)

Siaburcharpat Con Culaind

8815.
Johnston (Elva): The salvation of the individual and the salvation of society in Siaburcharpat Con Culaind.
In Individual in Celtic literatures (2000), pp. 109–125.

siächt

3137.
Eska (Joseph F.): More on Gaulish siöxt=i.
In ÉtC 30 (1994), pp. 205–210.
Rejects the view that OIr. siächt and Gaul. siöxt are cognates.

sían

3033.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Laud Herbal Glossary and English-Celtic contacts.
In CMCS 18 (Winter 1989), pp. 113–116.
Identifies entry 1315 sion as Irish and suggests a derivation from CC *spii̯on-.
2487.
Rusche (Philip G.): The Laud Herbal Glossary and English-Celtic contacts: a reappraisal.
In CMCS 42 (Winter 2001), pp. 73–82.
Argues (vs. E. P. Hamp, in CMCS 18 (Winter, 1989), pp. 113-116) that the entry sion is to be interpreted as Gr. σίον and not the Old Irish for ‘foxglove’.

sian

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

sian caurad

7651.
Sayers (William): Martial feats in the Old Irish Ulster cycle.
In CJIS/RCÉI 9/1 (1983), pp. 45–80.
Examines the early Irish lists of cles and discusses the individual feats, primarily those associated with Cú Chulainn in Táin bó Cúailnge (cf. TBC 1 ll. 1714-1719): 1. ubullchless; 2. fáeborchless; 3. fáenchless; 4. cless cletenach; 5.téchtless; 6. corpchless; 7. cless caitt; 8. ích n-erred; 9. cor ndeled; 10. léim dar néib/néim; 11. filliud erred náir; 12. gái bolga; 13. bái brasse; 14. rothchless; 15. ochtarchless; 16. cless for análaib; 17. bruud gine; 18. sian caurad; 19. béim co commus; 20. táithbéim; 21. dréim fri fogaist agus agus dírgud crette fora rind co fonnadm níad náir.

sians

16890.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): The expression of “sense, meaning, signification” in the Old Irish glosses, and particularly in the Milan and Saint Gall glosses.
In Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg (2016), pp. 85–100.
Discusses the use and meaning of OIr. terms for semantic concepts, such as séis, sians/séns, intliucht, cíall, and inne.

sibh

7212.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Forms of address in Irish and Swedish.
In Broadening the horizon of linguistic politeness (2005), pp. 235–244.
On the non-adoption of polite pronominal forms in Irish.

sich

3460.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 3. *sekw- ‘pronounce, speak’.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 171–174.
(a) *fo ·aisci, do ·fāisce: ad J. Carney's discussion of fásc ‘announcement’ and tásc ‘tidings received’, in Ériu 18 (1958), p. 34 (cf. BILL III: 5527); (b) tinchosc, tecosc: more on derivatives of sechid, including écosc; (c) sich ‘said’: ad J. Carney, ibid., p. 14 §13c, read sích.

sích

3460.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 3. *sekw- ‘pronounce, speak’.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 171–174.
(a) *fo ·aisci, do ·fāisce: ad J. Carney's discussion of fásc ‘announcement’ and tásc ‘tidings received’, in Ériu 18 (1958), p. 34 (cf. BILL III: 5527); (b) tinchosc, tecosc: more on derivatives of sechid, including écosc; (c) sich ‘said’: ad J. Carney, ibid., p. 14 §13c, read sích.

sı̄che

1029.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: VI. 2. The preterite of sichid/seichid ‘says’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 191–192.
ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 5 (1960), pp. 80-81. 3 sg. rel. sı̄che attested in an Old Irish gloss in Cáin Ḟuithirbe.
Binchy (D. A.) (ref.)

sichid

1029.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: VI. 2. The preterite of sichid/seichid ‘says’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 191–192.
ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 5 (1960), pp. 80-81. 3 sg. rel. sı̄che attested in an Old Irish gloss in Cáin Ḟuithirbe.
Binchy (D. A.) (ref.)

síd

1604.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The semantics of síd.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 137–155.
Síd/síth ‘Otherworld abode, hill or mound’ and síd/síth ‘peace’ are etymologically related, and are central to the notion and function of kingship.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 19-34.
2972.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 10. Irish síd ‘tumulus’ and Irish síd ‘peace’.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 141–142.
9570.
Sayers (William): La joie de la cort (Érec et Énide), Mabon, and early Irish síd [‘peace; Otherworld’.]
In Arthuriana 17/2 (Summer 2007), pp. 10–27.
The several anomalies of the Joie de la cort episode in Chrétien de Troyes’s Érec et Énide are addressed through the dual semantics of Irish síd, the equation of radiance and joy in the Celtic languages, and Mabon’s imprisonment in the ‘Bright Fortress’ of Caer Loyw.
10691.
MacInnes (John): Looking at legends of the supernatural.
In TGSI 59 (1994–1996), pp. 1–20.
Particularly on the Scottish sìthichean.
11774.
Sayers (William): Netherworld and Otherworld in early Irish literature.
In ZCP 59 (2012), pp. 201–230.
Discusses the topographical position of the Irish Otherworld, arguing it was displaced upwards and beyond in a 90º degree shift from an original subterranean and submarine location.
4971.
Saarinen (Jukka): “Irlannista hiiteen” : Irlannin ja suomen hiisiperinteen vertailua.
In Presenting Celtic studies in Finland (1993), pp. 64–84.
[(In Finnish:) Comparing the Irish and the Finnish hiisi traditions.] With English summary.
18253.
Höfler (Stefan): Notes on three “acrostatic” neuter s-stems.
In IF 119 (2014), pp. 293–338.
§3 PIE *sēd-es- [Etym. of OIr. síd].

síd ‘peace’

2972.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 10. Irish síd ‘tumulus’ and Irish síd ‘peace’.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 141–142.

Síd Truim

1274.
Hollo (Kaarina): Cú Chulainn and Síd Truim.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 13–22.
[1.] Introduction: reference to Síd Truim in poem in Serglige Con Culainn; [2.] Síd Truim and the Tuatha Dé Danann; [3.] Síd Truim as the place of Cú Chulainn’s birth: in first version of tale Compert Con Culainn contained in MS RIA D iv 2 (1223); [4.] Síd Truim as the place of Cú Chulainn’s burial: in poem A Oisín fuirigh ar Dhia; [5.] The location of Síd Truim; [6.] Conclusions.

síd ‘tumulus’

2972.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 10. Irish síd ‘tumulus’ and Irish síd ‘peace’.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 141–142.

síde

1935.
Carey (John): The Irish ‘otherworld’: Hiberno-Latin perspectives.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 154–159.
Hib-Lat. orbis used to convey meaning of OIr. síde, and validity of its English translation ‘otherworld’.

-side

12545.
Griffith (Aaron): Irish suide/-side ‘the aforementioned’.

sídh

10691.
MacInnes (John): Looking at legends of the supernatural.
In TGSI 59 (1994–1996), pp. 1–20.
Particularly on the Scottish sìthichean.

sìdh (ScG)

10691.
MacInnes (John): Looking at legends of the supernatural.
In TGSI 59 (1994–1996), pp. 1–20.
Particularly on the Scottish sìthichean.

sídheán (in place-names)

10412.
Ó Catháin (Séamas): An t-osnádúr agus an tíreolaíocht i logainmneacha Mhaigh Eo.
In Béaloideas 39–41 (1971–1973), pp. 212–227.

sìdhean (ScG) (in place names)

4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

sifil, sifil-seaifil ‘silly, senseless, unstable person’

1794.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Notaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 128–135.
Trí fhocal Nua-Ghaeilge: 1. Céimseata. 2. *gutalach. 3. climseáil.

Cúig fhocal ón mBéarla: 1. Rucust / rigeist / rógoiste. 2.Stráisplé. 3. deárlaí. 4. Cleaimideighs. 5. Sifil, sifleálann.

Trí ghnáthleagan cainte ag an bPluincéadach: 1. Cuirim foaina chosaibh. 2. Cac ar aithris. 3. Dhá uillinn.

sifleálann, sifleáil ‘to talk nonsense’

1794.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Notaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 128–135.
Trí fhocal Nua-Ghaeilge: 1. Céimseata. 2. *gutalach. 3. climseáil.

Cúig fhocal ón mBéarla: 1. Rucust / rigeist / rógoiste. 2.Stráisplé. 3. deárlaí. 4. Cleaimideighs. 5. Sifil, sifleálann.

Trí ghnáthleagan cainte ag an bPluincéadach: 1. Cuirim foaina chosaibh. 2. Cac ar aithris. 3. Dhá uillinn.

Sigurd

734.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): Intervention and disruption in the myths of Finn and Sigurd.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 123–131.
A typological study of heroic traditions relating to Irish Finn and Norse Sigurd.

síl

8805.
Wigger (Arndt): Denken und glauben im Neuirischen: Syntax und Semantik ausgewählter kognitiver Verben.
In 5. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2010), pp. 427–446.

Síl Lugdach

15824.
Lacey (Brian): Lug’s forgotten Donegal kingdom: the archaeology, history and folklore of the Síl Lugdach of Cloghaneely.
Dublin: Four Courts, 2012. x + 141 pp.
Rev. by
Charles W. MacQuarrie, in Speculum 89/2 (Apr., 2014), pp. 504-506.
Vicky McAlister, in StH 40 (2014), pp. 202-203.
Liam Ronayne, in JRSAI 141 (2011), pp. 221-223.

síle na gcíoch

6775.
Dunn (James H.): Síle na gcíoch.
In Éire-Ireland 12/1 (Spring 1977), pp. 68–85.
6860.
Freitag (Barbara): A new light on the Sheela-na-gig.
In Éire-Ireland 33/3-4–34/1 (Fall/Winter 1998–Spring 1999), pp. 50–69.
Includes a discussion of the name Sheela-na-gig.

sileadh (ScG)

704.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): On the expression of ‘rain’ and ‘it is raining’ in Irish.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 39–57.
1. Introduction; 2.0 OIr. flechud, fliuch; 2.1 OIr. bráen; 2.2 OIr. folc; 3.0 OIr. feraid flechud; MIr. ferthain; 3.1 MIr. bā̆istech; 3.2 OIr. snigid; 3.3 EModIr. silid; 4.0 ModIr.: Introduction; 4.1 Munster; 4.2 cuir as auxiliary; 4.3 Scottish Gaelic; Manx Gaelic (uisge, sileadh; fliaghey, fliaghagh, ceau). Section 4 is based mainly on LASID quests 270, 846-48, 896.

sílem

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

silid

704.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): On the expression of ‘rain’ and ‘it is raining’ in Irish.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 39–57.
1. Introduction; 2.0 OIr. flechud, fliuch; 2.1 OIr. bráen; 2.2 OIr. folc; 3.0 OIr. feraid flechud; MIr. ferthain; 3.1 MIr. bā̆istech; 3.2 OIr. snigid; 3.3 EModIr. silid; 4.0 ModIr.: Introduction; 4.1 Munster; 4.2 cuir as auxiliary; 4.3 Scottish Gaelic; Manx Gaelic (uisge, sileadh; fliaghey, fliaghagh, ceau). Section 4 is based mainly on LASID quests 270, 846-48, 896.

Sillán

2264.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): Some bogus Irish saints.
In Ainm 3 (1988), pp. 1–8.
Anesus (Nesus), Bríg, Ciar, Conchliath, Damán, Feilic, Feimme, Medrán, Meic Mochoba, Modiúit (Modút), Ródán, Sénán, Sillán, T’eolas.

*sim

1009.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish na nní: a case of quid pro quo?
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 168–181.
vs. P. Schrijver's view (in Studies in the History of Celtic Pronouns and Particles, Maynooth 1997) of the alleged neuter i-stem forms (PC *sim > InsC *sin) of the demonstrative *so(-). Also discusses the relevance of the paradigm and derivation of ‘anything, something’ and na ‘any’.
Schrijver (P.) (ref.)

Simhin

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

*sin

1009.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish na nní: a case of quid pro quo?
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 168–181.
vs. P. Schrijver's view (in Studies in the History of Celtic Pronouns and Particles, Maynooth 1997) of the alleged neuter i-stem forms (PC *sim > InsC *sin) of the demonstrative *so(-). Also discusses the relevance of the paradigm and derivation of ‘anything, something’ and na ‘any’.
Schrijver (P.) (ref.)

sin

7584.
Guyonvarc’h (Christian-J.): Notes d’étymologie et de lexicographie gauloises et celtiques XXXIII: 163. Galate Sinatos et Sinorix; celtique continental Sinatis.
In Ogam 22–25 (1970–1973), pp. 257–259.
On their relation to OIr. sin ‘necklace’, sín ‘weather’.

sín

7584.
Guyonvarc’h (Christian-J.): Notes d’étymologie et de lexicographie gauloises et celtiques XXXIII: 163. Galate Sinatos et Sinorix; celtique continental Sinatis.
In Ogam 22–25 (1970–1973), pp. 257–259.
On their relation to OIr. sin ‘necklace’, sín ‘weather’.

Sín

11861.
Williams (Mark): ‘Lady vengeance’: a reading of Sín in Aided Muirchertaig meic Erca.
In CMCS 62 (Winter 2011), pp. 1–32.

sin (ag sin)

1566.
Breatnach (R. A.): An gléas teaspáinteach.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
ag seo, ag sin.

Sinech Cró

16529.
Ó hIarlaithe (Aogán): Sinech Cró, an mháthair chíche agus an t-altramas in Éirinn sa mheánaois.
In Celtica 29 (2017), pp. 55–75.
Proposes an etymological analysis of Sinech as ‘the teated one’, and considers whether the role of the foster mother in medieval Ireland may have included wet-nursing.

Sínech dercu Búain

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

sinn

1963.
Mahon (William): First plural mar in Connacht Irish.
In Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 81–88.
1. Pronominal mur/mar; 2. Synthetic preterites in -(e)amar.

Use of mar as an indep. pron. and as 1pl marker outside the pret.

Sinna

479.
Dumville (David N.): Two troublesome abbots.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 146–152.
1. Cumméne, Abbot of Iona (657-69) [Epithet `Ailbe' reflects Lat. albus, Ir fionn]; 2. Flann, Abbot of Clonmacnoise (?724-732/3) [on the epithets Sinna(e) and Fíne / Fína].

sinne

1963.
Mahon (William): First plural mar in Connacht Irish.
In Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 81–88.
1. Pronominal mur/mar; 2. Synthetic preterites in -(e)amar.

Use of mar as an indep. pron. and as 1pl marker outside the pret.

siobáil

404.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 57–68.
1. Roinnt focal in -éad; 2. Dhá fhocal in -ús; 3. vardrús agus faithlios; 4. bab/bob; 5. lúmanaí; 6. raiclín; 7. Cúig ainm bhriathartha in -áil (siobáil, raitleáil, babáil, cuileáil, fraeicsáil); 8. gaillseach < gaibhlseach; 9. locáiste.

siobhag

1158.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Processes in nasalization and related issues.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 109–132.
The association of nasality and certain voiceless sounds: 1. Rhinoglottophilia, 2. Glottorhinophilia; 3. The sporadic change mh > m and related changes: (i) mh > m; (ii) amhrán; (iii) ScG siobhag; (iv) bh > b.

síog, síogaí `(a) rick(s)'

1763.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Some anomalous vowels.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 137–144.
Studies the phonology of borrowings from Hiberno-English into Irish: (a) Omeath póiríní and meascán; (b) Inishowen [yː] (fraoch, giumhas, síog, síoghaidhe).

síoghaidhe ‘a fairy’

1763.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Some anomalous vowels.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 137–144.
Studies the phonology of borrowings from Hiberno-English into Irish: (a) Omeath póiríní and meascán; (b) Inishowen [yː] (fraoch, giumhas, síog, síoghaidhe).

sion

2487.
Rusche (Philip G.): The Laud Herbal Glossary and English-Celtic contacts: a reappraisal.
In CMCS 42 (Winter 2001), pp. 73–82.
Argues (vs. E. P. Hamp, in CMCS 18 (Winter, 1989), pp. 113-116) that the entry sion is to be interpreted as Gr. σίον and not the Old Irish for ‘foxglove’.
3033.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Laud Herbal Glossary and English-Celtic contacts.
In CMCS 18 (Winter 1989), pp. 113–116.
Identifies entry 1315 sion as Irish and suggests a derivation from CC *spii̯on-.

sionn (ScG)

3033.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Laud Herbal Glossary and English-Celtic contacts.
In CMCS 18 (Winter 1989), pp. 113–116.
Identifies entry 1315 sion as Irish and suggests a derivation from CC *spii̯on-.

siopa (an tsiopa)

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

Síopra

787.
Greene (David): Varia: VI. 1. Siopra ‘Cyprus’.
In Ériu 32 (1981), p. 173.
Síopra is a loan-word from French.

sìos (ScG)

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.
10699.
Grant (James): The Gaelic of Strathspey and it relationship with other dialects.
In TGSI 61 (1998–2000), pp. 71–115.
Focuses on nineteen distinctive features of the Strathspey dialect:

1. Dropping of final unstressed vowel; 2. Dropping of vowel in -as ending; 3. Dropping of -adh ending; 4. He/it (m) (emphatic form) [ScG eise]; 5. They (pronunciation) [ScG aid]; 6. Independent future ending [-(e)as]; 7 & 8: Preaspiration; 9. Breaking of long é; 10. bh vocalized to u; 11. Final slender nn pronounced as ng; 12. Broad s becomes z (when preceded by n); 13. f becomes b (when preceded by m; 14. Playing [ScG. a’ cluich]; 15. Children [ScG cloinn]; 16. Down(wards) [ScG a-bhàn]; 17. East(wards) and west(wards) [ScG sìos, suas]; 18. (Fresh) water [bùrn]; 19. Boy [ScG praitseach].

Sírdruimm

12307.
Lacey (Brian): Tírechán’s Sírdruimm, Adomnán’s Dorsum Tómme.
In JRSAI 132 (2002), pp. 148–150.

sirem

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.
7676.
Stifter (David): Zur Bedeutung und Etymologie von altirisch sirem.
In Sprache 45/1-2 (2005), pp. 160–189.

siren (Lat.)

710.
Bowen (Charles): Varia: I. Notes on the Middle Irish word for ‘mermaid’.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 142–148.
Múrdúchann originally a compound meaning ‘sea-music’, ‘sea-chanting’ designated a fabulous menace at sea; during the MIr. period translators adopted múrdúchann as an equivalent for Lat. Siren; word applies exclusively to creatures of the female sex.

sírid

2973.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 11. OIr. seir, Welsh ffer, Ir. sírid; OIr. seirig.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 141–142.

sirite

1926.
Sayers (William): Airdrech, sirite, and other early Irish battlefield spirits.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 45–55.
With discussion of related terms.

sís

903.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. turgaire ‘act of inciting’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), p. 183.

sist (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

sit (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

síth

1604.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The semantics of síd.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 137–155.
Síd/síth ‘Otherworld abode, hill or mound’ and síd/síth ‘peace’ are etymologically related, and are central to the notion and function of kingship.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 19-34.
4971.
Saarinen (Jukka): “Irlannista hiiteen” : Irlannin ja suomen hiisiperinteen vertailua.
In Presenting Celtic studies in Finland (1993), pp. 64–84.
[(In Finnish:) Comparing the Irish and the Finnish hiisi traditions.] With English summary.

sith-

3684.
Isaac (G. R.): Welsh byw, byd, hyd.
In StC 36 (2002), pp. 145–147.
Supports F. Kortlandt's rule of pretonic shortening in Celtic (outlined in Slavic accentuation (1974), pp. 76-82) with a new example: OIr. sith- (W hyd).

sìth (ScG)

10691.
MacInnes (John): Looking at legends of the supernatural.
In TGSI 59 (1994–1996), pp. 1–20.
Particularly on the Scottish sìthichean.

sithbe

5320.
Greene (David): The chariot as described in Irish literature.
In Iron age in the Irish sea province (1972), pp. 59–73.
Discusses the terms dá ech, carpat, dá ndroch, fonnaid, sithbe, feirtsi, crett, cuing, dá n-all, clár, suide, etruide, éissi, brot.

sithbhe

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

sìthean (ScG)

4315.
Grannd (Seumas): Lexical geography of the Western Isles.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 146–149.
Discusses the distribution of the various words used for ‘flower’: flùr, dìthean and sìthean.

sìthiche (ScG)

10691.
MacInnes (John): Looking at legends of the supernatural.
In TGSI 59 (1994–1996), pp. 1–20.
Particularly on the Scottish sìthichean.

sìthichean (ScG)

925.
Ó Madagáin (Breandán): Gaelic lullaby: a charm to protect the baby?
In ScS 29 (1989), pp. 29–38.
Suggests that the original function of lullabies in Ireland and Scotland was to protect the sleeping child from being abducted by the .

sithlad

15209.
Loth (Joseph), Lambert (Pierre-Yves) (ed.): Notes inédites de Joseph Loth.
In Bretagne et pays celtiques [Mélanges Fleuriot] (1992), pp. 325–337.
Pt. II: “Notes étymologiques et lexicographiques” mansucrites. A. Additions à irl. moyen sithlad, sithlaim; gallois hiddl, breton moyen sizl; B. Addition à bodb; C. Vieil-irlandais inna builnni, irlandais moyen et moderne buille; D. manche, menechi.

With introduction and commentary by P.-Y. L.

síthlaid

2764.
Mikhailova (Tatiana), Nikolaeva (Natalia): The denotations of death in Goidelic: to the question of Celtic eschatological conceptions.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 93–115.
Studies the etymology and semantics of Irish expressions denoting ‘death’ as occurring in the texts, with the aim of retrieving the Celtic attitudes towards death.

síthlaigid

2764.
Mikhailova (Tatiana), Nikolaeva (Natalia): The denotations of death in Goidelic: to the question of Celtic eschatological conceptions.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 93–115.
Studies the etymology and semantics of Irish expressions denoting ‘death’ as occurring in the texts, with the aim of retrieving the Celtic attitudes towards death.

sit-sit (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

siür

2613.
Huld (Martin E.): Cú Chulainn and his IE kin.
In ZCP 38 (1981), pp. 238–241.
On the early Irish usage of siür as ‘woman’s brother’s daughter’ and a textual problem concerning the relationship between Deichtire and Conchobor in Táin bó Cúailnge recension II.

sïur

11028.
Hamp (Eric P.): Unexpected forms in Gaelic: piuthar and faca.
In SGS 26 (Summer 2010), pp. 5–6.

Skellig

3393.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings IV: Is Sceillec Old Norse?
In Peritia 13 (1999), pp. 310–311.
vs M. Oftedal's explanation (in Viking congress 7, pp. 125-133) as a Norse borrowing.

Skene

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

skiggsjá (ON)

873.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. ON skiggsjá: OIr. scáterc ‘mirror’.
In Ériu 35 (1984), p. 195.
OIr. scáterc from scáth ‘shadow’ + derc ‘eye’.

slab (ghost word)

2739.
Breeze (Andrew): Slab ‘mud’, an Old Irish ghostword: English slob ‘untidy person’.
In ZCP 47 (1995), pp. 87–88.
Draws attention to the incorrect inclusion of slab as an Old Irish word in DIL S, 255.71-72 and LEIA S-123, and explains ModIr. slab as a loan-word from Early Modern English.

slabar

3152.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 87–90.
1. sál; 2. sed; 3. slabar; 4. slice; 5. ta-; 6. tadg, tál; 7. tarr, torrach; 8. tinaid; 9. tindabrad, Findabair; 10. úall, úabar, úais; 11. *u̯ernā?, fern.

sladuighe satha

803.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: V. 1. PCT: Trí nóta.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 172–173.
1. Forleitheadas: Plunkett glosses Lat. faex as ‘Clann Thomáis Mhic Lóbais’; 2. sladuighe satha: vs. N. J. A. Williams, PCT, p. 151 n. 936: should be translated as ‘hive-robber, drone’ (cf. ladrann saithe); 3. ruisín vs. N. J. A. Williams, PCT 188 s.v.: refers to ‘lunch, etc.'; cf. T. de Bhaldraithe, in Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 169-171.

slaidid

3377.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Meyer to Gaidoz: an emendation between friends.
In Peritia 15 (2001), p. 378.
ad p. 20.17, as ed. by Kuno Meyer 1902 (Best1, p. 118).

slam

1502.
Ó Súilleabháin (Pádraig): Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 22–23.
1. dálach ‘mournful, sad, sorrowful’ in Annals of the Four Masters; 2. slam: siabhra slaim ‘fairy or magic hosts ?' (sic leg. not siabhra Sláini as printed by O’Donovan in his edition of Annals of the Four Masters) ; 3. tiagh: as a tiaghaibh in Annals of Ulster vs. as a ttiaghaibh fearrdha in (unpublished portion of) Annals of the Four Masters.
O’Donovan (John) (ref.)

slamm

11387.
Breeze (Andrew): Slammakin ‘slovenly female’ and Irish.
In N&Q 58/3 (Sep. 2011), pp. 368–369.

slámóg

11387.
Breeze (Andrew): Slammakin ‘slovenly female’ and Irish.
In N&Q 58/3 (Sep. 2011), pp. 368–369.

Slán (well)

4071.
Aitchison (Nicholas B.): Votive deposition in Iron Age Ireland: an early medieval account.
In Emania 15 (1996), pp. 67–75.
Discusses Tírechán’s account of St. Patrick at the well of Slán.

Slanemore

5501.
McGreevy (Conor): Some early Irish battles sites identified.
In RíM 6/3 (1977), pp. 60–61.
Druim Dearg, Dumha Achir, Granairet, Druim Lochmuide, Guil na Maigher Fremhu, Slanemore.

Slánga

11912.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Placenames and mythology in Irish tradition: places, pilgrimages and things.
In NACCS 1 (1988), pp. 319–341.

sléagar

14417.
Mac Cárthaigh (Eoin): Sléagar agus ‘genitives lenited in special circumstances’ i bhfilíocht na scol.
In Aon don éigse (2015), pp. 239–245.

sleg (tachraidh sleg ina ucht)

1519.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): The act of wounding in the death of Muirchertach mac Erca.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh 1973), pp. 141–144.
MS TCD H 2. 7 tacr— sl— ina ucht to be expanded as tachraidh sleg ina ucht ‘a spear meets him in the chest’ in tale Aided Muirchertaig meic Erca §41 (BILL 5117). Emendation illustrates how previous editorial misinterpretation obscured the motif of the threefold death in this tale.

slégar

14417.
Mac Cárthaigh (Eoin): Sléagar agus ‘genitives lenited in special circumstances’ i bhfilíocht na scol.
In Aon don éigse (2015), pp. 239–245.

sléic

853.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): Varia: V. Old Irish sléic.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 185–186.
ad D. Greene, in Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163-164. Suggests a correspondence with Lat. nitrum and that sléic meant potash, as a personal detergent, and perhaps also a coloured, friable salt used as a cosmetic.
Greene (D.) (ref.)
861.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. Sg. 69a9.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163–164.
Lat. lodix glossed with Ir. sléic (means ‘pumice’, possibly related to slíachtaid ‘smoothes’), ruamnae (earlier form of rúamna ‘colouring matter, redish colour’), diol (‘fillet, diadem’): all exx. of ornamentum muliebre. Also suggests Ir. slíogadh ‘smoothing, polishing’ derives from ON slíkja ‘to smoothe’, although slíocadh forms may have been influenced by Engl. slick ‘to slick, polish, smooth’.
3097.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Notes lexicographiques: [2.] Vieil-irlandais sléic.
In ÉtC 27 (1990), pp. 200–202.
Suggests, through comparison with Br. stloac, that this is a Pátraic loan-word from a Brittonic *stlēgi (< CC *stleik-(i-?) ‘cendres de lessive’.

sleith

6892.
Campanile (Enrico): Sulla struttura del matrimonio indoeuropeo.
In SCO 33 (1983), pp. 273–286.
Appendice: Ant. irl. lánamnas sleithe.

Reprinted in Saggi Campanile, pp. 241-248.

sleth

6892.
Campanile (Enrico): Sulla struttura del matrimonio indoeuropeo.
In SCO 33 (1983), pp. 273–286.
Appendice: Ant. irl. lánamnas sleithe.

Reprinted in Saggi Campanile, pp. 241-248.

Sletty

1377.
Byrne (Francis John): A note on Trim and Sletty.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 316–319.
Discusses foundation legends of the churches of Trim and Sletty in the Book of Armagh.

slíab

5106.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Old Irish heights and word-field potential.
In StH 24 (1984–1988), pp. 29–50.
OIr. ard, ardae, dígas, dígsa, mullach, slíab, tulach.
12438.
Tempan (Paul): Sliabh in Irish place-names.
In Nomina 32 (2009), pp. 19–41.
5453.
Taylor (Simon): Sliabh in Scottish place-names: its meaning and chronology.
In JSNS 1 (2007), pp. 99–136.
16729.
Pyysalo (Jouna): Ten new etymologies between Old Gaulish and the Indo-European languages.
In SCF 13 (2016), pp. 47–68.
1. OGaul. asia- ‘secale’: Lith. asỹ- ‘Schachtel-, Schafthalm’; 2. OGaul. nemnali- ‘célébrer’: RV. námna- ‘sich beugen/neigen’ [OIr. nemnall]; 3. OGaul. mapalia- ‘kindlich’: TochA. mkälto- ‘jung, klein’ [OIr. macc]; 4. OGaul. mas ‘gl. metallum’: TochA. msāṣ ‘imo : from beneath’; 5. OGaul. cunobarro- (PN.) ‘Tête-de-Chien’ : CLu. paraia- ‘hoch’ [OIr. barr]; 6. OGaul. marco- ‘horse’: TochA. markä- ‘move’ [OIr. marc]; 7. OGaul. slēbino- ‘montanus’: TochB. ṣale ‘mountain, hill’ [OIr. slíab]; 8. OGaul. cobro- ‘love, desire, greed’: TochB. kakāpo- ‘desire, crave, want’ [OIr. -chobur, (ad-)cobra, etc.]; 9. OGaul. mallo- ‘langsam, träge’: TochB. mālle ‘dull’ [OIr. mall]; 10. OGaul. bilio- ‘Baum’: TochB. pilta- ‘leaf, petal’ [OIr. bile].

Sliab Betha

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.

Sliab Caín

1325.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Cenn Ebrat, Sliab Caín, Belach Ebrat, Belach Legtha/Lechta.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 153–171.
Identifications of the following place-names on the Limerick-Cork border: [1.] Cenn Ebrat/Febrat; [2.] Belach Legtha; [3.] Cenn Ebrat; [4.] Sliab Caín; [5.] Belach Ebrat / Febrat; [6.] An Sliabh Riabhach; [7.] Belach Lechta [Redsheard/Redchair; An Bhearna Dhearg]; [8.] ‘Lacht Mahon’ [Leacht Mhaghthamhna]; [9.] Conclusions.

Sliab Domangart

11912.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Placenames and mythology in Irish tradition: places, pilgrimages and things.
In NACCS 1 (1988), pp. 319–341.

Slíab Echtge

6086.
Ó Con Cheanainn (Tomás): Dhá shliabh i gcríocha imill Chonnach agus na Mumhan atá luaite in Agallamh na Seanórach.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 53–55.
Sliabh Cairn, Sliabh Eachtgha.

Sliab Fuait

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

Sliab Monduirn

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

Slíab Monduirn (> Moduirn)

1528.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Cess Naíden.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), p. 252.
naíden < noínden and the occasional development nd > d in Middle Irish, e.g. (Slíab) Monduirn > (Slíab) Moduirn, Illandon > Illadon, tindnacol > tidnacol.

Sliab Slánga

11912.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Placenames and mythology in Irish tradition: places, pilgrimages and things.
In NACCS 1 (1988), pp. 319–341.

sliabh

8899.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Gaelic sliabh revisited.
In Fil súil nglais [Fs. C. Ó Baoill] (2007), pp. 175–186.
5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.
16109.
Broderick (George): Sliabh (slieau) in Man.
In Ainm 11 (2012), pp. 47–64.

Sliabh Cairn

6086.
Ó Con Cheanainn (Tomás): Dhá shliabh i gcríocha imill Chonnach agus na Mumhan atá luaite in Agallamh na Seanórach.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 53–55.
Sliabh Cairn, Sliabh Eachtgha.

Sliabh Calláin

16235.
McInerney (Luke): Lettermoylan of Clann Bhruaideadha: a résumé of their landholding, topography and history.
In NMAJ 52 (2012), pp. 81–113.

Sliabh Cláire

10006.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Cláire and its disputed location.
In NMAJ 50 (2010), pp. 109–120.

Sliabh Eachtgha

6086.
Ó Con Cheanainn (Tomás): Dhá shliabh i gcríocha imill Chonnach agus na Mumhan atá luaite in Agallamh na Seanórach.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 53–55.
Sliabh Cairn, Sliabh Eachtgha.

Sliabh Eibhlinne

9992.
Tempan (Paul): Two mountain names: Slieve Felim and Mauherslieve.
In NMAJ 46 (2006), pp. 119–125.

Sliabh Fuaid

2331.
Arthurs (J. B.): BUPNS reprints 10: Sliabh Fuaid.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 162–170.
Repr. from BUPNS 2/3 (Autumn 1954), p. 67.

Sliabh gCua

5618.
Columcille (An tAthair [Ó Conmhaigh]): Where was Sliabh gCua?
In Decies 46 (Autumn 1992), pp. 5–9.

sliabh (in place names)

12438.
Tempan (Paul): Sliabh in Irish place-names.
In Nomina 32 (2009), pp. 19–41.

Sliabh Riabhach, An

1325.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Cenn Ebrat, Sliab Caín, Belach Ebrat, Belach Legtha/Lechta.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 153–171.
Identifications of the following place-names on the Limerick-Cork border: [1.] Cenn Ebrat/Febrat; [2.] Belach Legtha; [3.] Cenn Ebrat; [4.] Sliab Caín; [5.] Belach Ebrat / Febrat; [6.] An Sliabh Riabhach; [7.] Belach Lechta [Redsheard/Redchair; An Bhearna Dhearg]; [8.] ‘Lacht Mahon’ [Leacht Mhaghthamhna]; [9.] Conclusions.

sliabh (ScG) (in place names)

5453.
Taylor (Simon): Sliabh in Scottish place-names: its meaning and chronology.
In JSNS 1 (2007), pp. 99–136.
4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

slíachtaid

861.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. Sg. 69a9.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163–164.
Lat. lodix glossed with Ir. sléic (means ‘pumice’, possibly related to slíachtaid ‘smoothes’), ruamnae (earlier form of rúamna ‘colouring matter, redish colour’), diol (‘fillet, diadem’): all exx. of ornamentum muliebre. Also suggests Ir. slíogadh ‘smoothing, polishing’ derives from ON slíkja ‘to smoothe’, although slíocadh forms may have been influenced by Engl. slick ‘to slick, polish, smooth’.

slice

3152.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 87–90.
1. sál; 2. sed; 3. slabar; 4. slice; 5. ta-; 6. tadg, tál; 7. tarr, torrach; 8. tinaid; 9. tindabrad, Findabair; 10. úall, úabar, úais; 11. *u̯ernā?, fern.

slicht

820.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. OIr. slicht.
In Ériu 34 (1983), p. 188.
2001.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Rawlinson B 502, Lebar Glinne Dá Locha and Saltair na Rann.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 109–132.
Argues that Saltair na Rann is the old name for the second vellum part of MS Rawlinson B 502, against P. Ó Riain's identification of this MS with the lost Book of Glendalough (in Éigse 18 (1981), pp. 161-76). Also on the textual history of the Pedigrees of the Saints, and the poems Druim Ceta Céte na Náem, Colum Cille co Dia domerail, Tánic sam slán sóer, Fuitt co bráth and Cia lín don rígraid ráin ruaid.

slick (Engl.)

861.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. Sg. 69a9.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163–164.
Lat. lodix glossed with Ir. sléic (means ‘pumice’, possibly related to slíachtaid ‘smoothes’), ruamnae (earlier form of rúamna ‘colouring matter, redish colour’), diol (‘fillet, diadem’): all exx. of ornamentum muliebre. Also suggests Ir. slíogadh ‘smoothing, polishing’ derives from ON slíkja ‘to smoothe’, although slíocadh forms may have been influenced by Engl. slick ‘to slick, polish, smooth’.

slieau (Mx) (in place names)

2122.
Broderick (George): Sprachkontakt und Sprachgeschichte der Insel Man im Rahmen ihrer Ortsnamen.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 57–65.
5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.
16109.
Broderick (George): Sliabh (slieau) in Man.
In Ainm 11 (2012), pp. 47–64.

Slieve Felim

9992.
Tempan (Paul): Two mountain names: Slieve Felim and Mauherslieve.
In NMAJ 46 (2006), pp. 119–125.

Slieve Gullion

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

slige

4169.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 6. slige ‘road’.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 182–183.
11966.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): On Indo-European roads.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 299–341.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms áth, belach, bóthar, casán, conar, drochet, éol, rith, sét, séol, slige.

sligid

3377.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Meyer to Gaidoz: an emendation between friends.
In Peritia 15 (2001), p. 378.
ad p. 20.17, as ed. by Kuno Meyer 1902 (Best1, p. 118).

slíkja (ON)

861.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. Sg. 69a9.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163–164.
Lat. lodix glossed with Ir. sléic (means ‘pumice’, possibly related to slíachtaid ‘smoothes’), ruamnae (earlier form of rúamna ‘colouring matter, redish colour’), diol (‘fillet, diadem’): all exx. of ornamentum muliebre. Also suggests Ir. slíogadh ‘smoothing, polishing’ derives from ON slíkja ‘to smoothe’, although slíocadh forms may have been influenced by Engl. slick ‘to slick, polish, smooth’.

slincín

436.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 1–10.
1. bleachtaire, miolcaire; 2. bráca; 3. burdún; 4. cailpís; 5. cáipéis/cáipís; 6. daorach; 7. malach; 8. ninsceachán, ninsci, ninscim, etc.; 9. painéad; 10. pasálann; 11. pasúr; 12. slincín; 13. splincéara; 14. sprioc; 15. trantal.

slincín

1954.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 124–130.
1. góirséad; 2. mábla; 3. miúndáil; 4. sáirse; 5. slincín; 6. trombhód.

slinneanachd (ScG)

1616.
Burnett (Charles S. F.): Arabic divinatory texts and Celtic folklore: a comment on the theory and practice of scapulimancy in Western Europe.
In CMCS 6 (Winter 1983), pp. 31–42.
The practice of divination from sheep’s shoulder blades (ScG slinneannachd) is traced from seventeenth century Gaelic folk-culture back to medieval Arabic treatises composed in Spain. Incl. plts.

slíocadh

861.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. Sg. 69a9.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163–164.
Lat. lodix glossed with Ir. sléic (means ‘pumice’, possibly related to slíachtaid ‘smoothes’), ruamnae (earlier form of rúamna ‘colouring matter, redish colour’), diol (‘fillet, diadem’): all exx. of ornamentum muliebre. Also suggests Ir. slíogadh ‘smoothing, polishing’ derives from ON slíkja ‘to smoothe’, although slíocadh forms may have been influenced by Engl. slick ‘to slick, polish, smooth’.

slíogadh

861.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. Sg. 69a9.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163–164.
Lat. lodix glossed with Ir. sléic (means ‘pumice’, possibly related to slíachtaid ‘smoothes’), ruamnae (earlier form of rúamna ‘colouring matter, redish colour’), diol (‘fillet, diadem’): all exx. of ornamentum muliebre. Also suggests Ir. slíogadh ‘smoothing, polishing’ derives from ON slíkja ‘to smoothe’, although slíocadh forms may have been influenced by Engl. slick ‘to slick, polish, smooth’.

slip

12342.
Mag Eacháin (Conchúr): Téarmaí duáin.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 188–198.
1. friofac / ruthag / ruaibh(r)ic, srl.; 2. craobhóg; 3. crúca; 4. fiochrán; 5. fioradh an duáin; 6. freithiún; 7. frídín, fríde; 8. frithionga; 9. friochan; 10. gob an duáin; 11. ionga; 12. luiseag; 13. lusa; 14. slip; 15. súil; 16. teanga.

sliss

4171.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 9. OIr. sliss = W. ystlys.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 183.

slóg

12657.
Matasović (Ranko): Some Celto-Slavic etymologies.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 3 (2010), pp. 15–20.
Examines the exclusive Celto-Slavic lexical isoglosses in EDPC (1. PC *ēskyo- ‘moon’ [OIr. éscae, ésca, éisce]; 2. PC *fitu- ‘food’ [OIr. ith]; 3. PC *lūtu- ‘anger, power’ [OIr. lúth]; 4. PC *ruxtu- ‘noise’ [MIr. rucht]; 5. PC *slowgo- ‘troop, army’ [OIr. slúag, slóg]; 6. PC *talskV- ‘fragment, piece’ [cf. OIr. tailm]; 7. PC *krissu- ‘belt’ [OIr. cris]; 8. PC *kat-yo- ‘throw’ [OIr. caithid]), and proposes some new etymologies (1. PC *obnu ‘fear’ [OIr. omun]; 2. PC *frāno- ‘mane’ [ModIr. rón]; 3. PC *gissā- ‘taboo, prohibition’ [MIr. geis]; 4. PC *wesnālā- ‘swallow’ [OIr. fannall]).

slógad

16198.
Bannerman (John): The Scots language and the kin-based society.
In Gaelic and Scots in harmony (1990), pp. 1–19.
Discusses the use of Gaelic legal terms and concepts in Scots law.

slóiged

5903.
Simms (Katharine): Gaelic military history and the later Brehon law commentaries.
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 51–67.
Discusses passages of late legal commentary relating to military service and the billeting of soldiers, with particular attention to the terms meath slóighidh, fuba and ruba.

slúag

12657.
Matasović (Ranko): Some Celto-Slavic etymologies.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 3 (2010), pp. 15–20.
Examines the exclusive Celto-Slavic lexical isoglosses in EDPC (1. PC *ēskyo- ‘moon’ [OIr. éscae, ésca, éisce]; 2. PC *fitu- ‘food’ [OIr. ith]; 3. PC *lūtu- ‘anger, power’ [OIr. lúth]; 4. PC *ruxtu- ‘noise’ [MIr. rucht]; 5. PC *slowgo- ‘troop, army’ [OIr. slúag, slóg]; 6. PC *talskV- ‘fragment, piece’ [cf. OIr. tailm]; 7. PC *krissu- ‘belt’ [OIr. cris]; 8. PC *kat-yo- ‘throw’ [OIr. caithid]), and proposes some new etymologies (1. PC *obnu ‘fear’ [OIr. omun]; 2. PC *frāno- ‘mane’ [ModIr. rón]; 3. PC *gissā- ‘taboo, prohibition’ [MIr. geis]; 4. PC *wesnālā- ‘swallow’ [OIr. fannall]).

slusaí

11734.
Breeze (Andrew): Dunbar’s brylyoun, carrybald, cawandaris, slawsy, strekouris, and traikit.
In N&Q 54/2 (Jun. 2007), pp. 125–128.
< Ir. brillín, carbad, caileantóir, slusaí, sracaire, tréig.

smacht

3578.
Meid (Wolfgang): Über konträre Bedeutung: Bemerkungen zum sogenannten ‘Gegensinn’.
In StC 14–15 (1979–1980), pp. 193–199.
Discusses examples from the Irish legal language: geis, smacht, díguin.

smailc

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

smál

15245.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Chomh gorm le smál revisited.
In Éigse 39 (2016), pp. 243–245.
Argues Mod. Ir. smál ‘blue’ (used by Donegal writer Séamus Ó Grianna) < Engl. smalt.

smeirdris

3442.
Borsje (Jacqueline): The movement of water as symbolised by monsters in early Irish texts.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 153–170.
Discusses the development of the motif of sea-monsters that move water, arguing that, although there are early references to the classical Charybdis in Hiberno-Latin texts, the connection of the two concepts is first seen in the muirdris of Echtra Fergusa maic Léti.

smér

9032.
Hamp (Eric P.): Mōrum.
In AJPh 94/2 (Summer 1973), pp. 167–169.
OIr. smér.

Smerwick, Co. Kerry

10630.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Old Norse place names II: Muirbech, Smjǫrvík.
In Peritia 11 (1997), p. 187.
Smerwick, Murreagh, Co. Kerry.

smirdris

3442.
Borsje (Jacqueline): The movement of water as symbolised by monsters in early Irish texts.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 153–170.
Discusses the development of the motif of sea-monsters that move water, arguing that, although there are early references to the classical Charybdis in Hiberno-Latin texts, the connection of the two concepts is first seen in the muirdris of Echtra Fergusa maic Léti.

smól

15245.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Chomh gorm le smál revisited.
In Éigse 39 (2016), pp. 243–245.
Argues Mod. Ir. smál ‘blue’ (used by Donegal writer Séamus Ó Grianna) < Engl. smalt.

smùid (ScG)

4445.
Meek (Donald E.): Smoking, drinking, dancing and singing on the high seas: steamships and the uses of smùid in Scottish Gaelic.
In ScotL 25 (2006), pp. 46–70.
Includes a comparison with the use of smúit in Irish.

smuilcín

1904.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 124–129.
1. Codhalc; 2. Coparús; 3. cuitbéar/cuiptéar; 4. gaimiléir; 5. gallán; 6. losán; 7. póiméid; 8. réadóir; 9. smuilcín.
5180.
Breeze (Andrew): An Irish etymology for smulkin ‘brass farthing’.
In StH 33 (2004–2005), pp. 147–148.
< smuilcín ‘snout’.

smúit

4445.
Meek (Donald E.): Smoking, drinking, dancing and singing on the high seas: steamships and the uses of smùid in Scottish Gaelic.
In ScotL 25 (2006), pp. 46–70.
Includes a comparison with the use of smúit in Irish.

smulkin (Hib-Engl)

5180.
Breeze (Andrew): An Irish etymology for smulkin ‘brass farthing’.
In StH 33 (2004–2005), pp. 147–148.
< smuilcín ‘snout’.

(sna) luchógaí

12344.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Dornán iasachtaí sa Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 246–251.
1. giústa / giúsda / giusda; 2. bolb; 3. corsaicí / cursaicí / cosaicí / cosáicí; 4. (sna) luchógaí; 5. agaill / agailt / agaille / angailt / anglach; 6. pailis / pailís / pálás.

sn[a]idh[m]fed

1065.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Three notes on Cath Maige Tuired.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 61–68.
1. An unnecessary emendation (vs. W. Stokes's emendation of snidhfed to sn[a]idh[m]fed, in RC 12 (1891), pp. 306-08 (§14), reproduced in E. A. Gray, Cath Maige Tuired (1982); also discussion of the theme of womenfolk’s intervention in political affairs); 2. OIr. -tochus (Interprets MS toc̄sa (§67) as tochus, prototonic fut. 1 sg. of do-cing ‘steps, strides forward; advances, comes’); 3. A redactorial intrusion [in §69].
Gray (E. A.) (ref.), Stokes (W.) (ref.)

snáidid

3217.
Ford (Patrick K.), Hamp (Eric P.): Welsh asswynaw and Celtic legal idiom.
In BBCS 26/2 (May 1975), pp. 147–160.
Pt.I: Discusses Welsh and Irish idioms for legally bound protection; Pt. II: Etymological discussion (particularly on Ir. aithlech, saigid, snáidid, naidm).

-snáither (to-snáither)

724.
Watkins (Calvert): Is tre ḟír flathemon: marginalia to Audacht Morainn.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 181–198.
Discusses other PIE parallels of ‘Act of Truth’ and cognate verbal expressions of the following four expressions: 1. Is tre ḟír flathemon ‘it is through the ruler’s truth’; 2. mortlithi (mórslóg no) márlóchet di doínib dingbatar ‘plagues, (a great host, or) great lightnings are warded off men’; 3. gáu ḟlathemon ‘ruler’s falsehood’; 4. [n]-aurdallat dána (support for emendation to ní-n-aurdallat anai ‘let not riches blind him’ (see F. Kelly, AM §31); 5. to- aidble éisc i sruthaib -snáither (emends to to- aidbli éisc i sruthaib -snáither ‘with abundance of fish it is swum in streams’, taking to-snáither to be an impersonal passive rather than 2nd sg. deponent (see F. Kelly, AM §20).

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 626-643.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)

snám

9598.
Sayers (William): Games, sport and para-military exercise in early Ireland.
In Aethlon 10/1 (Fall 1992), pp. 105–123.
Reviews D. Binchy's discussion (in Celtica 8.144) of the terms for games and sports named in Mellbretha: 1. lúb, líathróit; 2. corthe críche; 3. tochailt trebán; 4. lém; 5. snám; 6. sraenán; 7. brandub; 8. fidchell; 9. buanfach; 10. folach migán; 11. immarchor uanán; 12. ardchless co n-ublaib; 13. bocluasc; 14. echréim; 15. cor cloiche; 16. dréim; 17. léim; 18. díbirciud; 19. uathad fri hilar; 20. crosdibirciud; 21. táithe tuilche; 22. bundsach i n-airecht.

Appendix: A synthetic version of the lists of martial feats (cles) as found in the Ulster cycle of tales.

snéadhbhairdne

1672.
Harrison (Alan): Snéadhbhairdne.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 181–196.
Identifies two different types of snéadhbhairdne in crosántacht texts of the ClModIr period. Argues that the amhrán metre of later crosántacht texts derives from the syllabic snéadhbhairdne of earlier ones. Provides a rearrangment in amhrán form of snéadhbhairdne of the crosántacht beg. Targaire dhearscnaí do rinneadh le Créafann (based on text in NDii 31–33) by Peadar Ó Doirnín.

snechtae

3275.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): ‘Snow’ and ‘it is snowing’ in Irish and Welsh: a semantic study.
In BBCS 29/1 (Nov. 1980), pp. 66–79.

sní

2765.
Shields (Kenneth, Jr.): On the origin of the Celtic first and second person plural personal pronouns in *s-.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 168–180.
Postulates metathesized *sne, *swe (< PIE *n̥s-e, *us-e as the ultimate source of OIr. sní, .

snidhfed

1065.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Three notes on Cath Maige Tuired.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 61–68.
1. An unnecessary emendation (vs. W. Stokes's emendation of snidhfed to sn[a]idh[m]fed, in RC 12 (1891), pp. 306-08 (§14), reproduced in E. A. Gray, Cath Maige Tuired (1982); also discussion of the theme of womenfolk’s intervention in political affairs); 2. OIr. -tochus (Interprets MS toc̄sa (§67) as tochus, prototonic fut. 1 sg. of do-cing ‘steps, strides forward; advances, comes’); 3. A redactorial intrusion [in §69].
Gray (E. A.) (ref.), Stokes (W.) (ref.)

snigid

3275.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): ‘Snow’ and ‘it is snowing’ in Irish and Welsh: a semantic study.
In BBCS 29/1 (Nov. 1980), pp. 66–79.
3272.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [3.] Welsh nyf ≠ OIr. snigid.
In BBCS 28/3 (Nov. 1979), p. 402.
3333.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 8. On snow in Ireland.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 280–281.
arg develops semantically from ‘snow’ to ‘drop’; cf. snechta ‘snow’ related to snigid ‘drips’.
704.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): On the expression of ‘rain’ and ‘it is raining’ in Irish.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 39–57.
1. Introduction; 2.0 OIr. flechud, fliuch; 2.1 OIr. bráen; 2.2 OIr. folc; 3.0 OIr. feraid flechud; MIr. ferthain; 3.1 MIr. bā̆istech; 3.2 OIr. snigid; 3.3 EModIr. silid; 4.0 ModIr.: Introduction; 4.1 Munster; 4.2 cuir as auxiliary; 4.3 Scottish Gaelic; Manx Gaelic (uisge, sileadh; fliaghey, fliaghagh, ceau). Section 4 is based mainly on LASID quests 270, 846-48, 896.
2899.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia etymologica: 1. Welsh ffriw, ewin, tafod and labio-velars.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 461–466.
OIr. tengae, ingen, lugu, daig, snigid.

sniïd

1065.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Three notes on Cath Maige Tuired.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 61–68.
1. An unnecessary emendation (vs. W. Stokes's emendation of snidhfed to sn[a]idh[m]fed, in RC 12 (1891), pp. 306-08 (§14), reproduced in E. A. Gray, Cath Maige Tuired (1982); also discussion of the theme of womenfolk’s intervention in political affairs); 2. OIr. -tochus (Interprets MS toc̄sa (§67) as tochus, prototonic fut. 1 sg. of do-cing ‘steps, strides forward; advances, comes’); 3. A redactorial intrusion [in §69].
Gray (E. A.) (ref.), Stokes (W.) (ref.)

*so

1009.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish na nní: a case of quid pro quo?
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 168–181.
vs. P. Schrijver's view (in Studies in the History of Celtic Pronouns and Particles, Maynooth 1997) of the alleged neuter i-stem forms (PC *sim > InsC *sin) of the demonstrative *so(-). Also discusses the relevance of the paradigm and derivation of ‘anything, something’ and na ‘any’.
Schrijver (P.) (ref.)

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.

so

1341.
Mac Gill’Ìosa (Uilleam): Mo chreach-sa chàinig.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 45–59.
Argues that so replaces do as a preverbal particle; evidence mainly from verse texts dated to seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

so- ‘good’

3794.
Hamp (Eric P.): Does morphological reconstruction really exist?
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 65–87.
Exposes the set of rules that govern Proto-Indo-European derivational patterns involving the prefix *h1su and the adjectival *-i, which is illustrated especially by examples of the several compounding types occurring with OIr. so-. In addition argues that the Old Irish negative prefix neb-/neph- derives from the petrified result of the prefix concatenation *ne-su- before a vowel.

socair

4166.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 3. socair.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 182.

socc

1414.
Testen (David): Stem-final *-kk- in Celtic terms for ‘pig’.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 161–164.
Proposes etymologies for *mokku- > Ir. mucc, and *sukko- > W hwch (cf. Ir. socc ‘ploughshare, snout’).

sochor

1592.
Quin (E. G.): The early Irish poem Ísucán.
In CMCS 1 (Summer 1981), pp. 39–52.
Poem beg. Ísucán / alar limm im dísertán, ed. with English translation and notes from MSS RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), Brussels 5100–04, RIA 23 P 2 (Book of Lecan), Franciscan A 7, Laud Misc. 610, RIA 23 P 3. Emphasises legal force of the text, with discussion of legal metaphors and terms such as ernaid, sochor, doérrathaig.

socht

677.
Watkins (Calvert): Sick-maintenance in Indo-European.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 21–25.
OIr. socht ‘stupor’ originally denoted a pathological state or variety of ‘sickness’; derivation from *sóktos from root *sek- ‘dryness’.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 560-564.
2939.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 1. IE *sek- ‘to lose healthy moisture’.
In ÉtC 17 (1980), p. 165.
OIr. socht.

sochuide

7077.
Stifter (David): Varia: II. A rule for z-deletion in Irish?
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 159–164.
vs. GOI §218. Includes a discussion of the etymology of OIr. sochuide.

sód

1988.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Sódh i logainmneacha.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 129–134.
Also: OIr. rot macin (BB) in Onom. Goed. is a scribal error for sod maicin (Bk of Lecan) (= ModIr Sódh Maicín).

sod maicin

1988.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Sódh i logainmneacha.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 129–134.
Also: OIr. rot macin (BB) in Onom. Goed. is a scribal error for sod maicin (Bk of Lecan) (= ModIr Sódh Maicín).

sod ‘weir’ (ghost word)

1988.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Sódh i logainmneacha.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 129–134.
Also: OIr. rot macin (BB) in Onom. Goed. is a scribal error for sod maicin (Bk of Lecan) (= ModIr Sódh Maicín).

Sodelb derco Birn

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Sódh Macáin

1988.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Sódh i logainmneacha.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 129–134.
Also: OIr. rot macin (BB) in Onom. Goed. is a scribal error for sod maicin (Bk of Lecan) (= ModIr Sódh Maicín).

Soft Rump [Parliament; 6 December 1648]

1682.
Harrison (Alan): ‘The soft rump’.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), p. 236.
`Parliamentárians na dtárr maothlach’ from poem beg. Innisim fís is ní fís bhréige í (= An Síogaí Rómhánach, FSCPP 22 l. 112) based on Engl ‘The Soft Rump’, which was used to refer to ‘The Rump Parliament’ of 6 December 1648, which condemned Charles I to death.

soí toí

1499.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Techt tuidecht.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 1–6.
On ‘rhyming jingles’, often consisting of nominalised imperatives, e.g. techt tuidecht, aig thaig, soí toí, áin tháin (ám [t]hám in LL 34840 corrupt); cf. sa(i)n cha(i)n, baí chaí, ócaib tócaib — all denoting `(quick) movement to and fro’. Some discussion of rhyming combinations of two words in ModIr.

soïd

1226.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On the origin of the Old Irish hiatus verb soïd.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 75–80.

soïmōl

3768.
Quin (E. G.): Textual notes: [3] Scéla mucce Meic Dathó.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 95–97.
ad R. Thurneysen 1935 (Best2 1134).

soirb

4167.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 4. soirb.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 182.

*sóktos

677.
Watkins (Calvert): Sick-maintenance in Indo-European.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 21–25.
OIr. socht ‘stupor’ originally denoted a pathological state or variety of ‘sickness’; derivation from *sóktos from root *sek- ‘dryness’.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 560-564.

Solam

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

solan (Engl)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

soma

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

son

1192.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: V. 1. OIr. sondon.
In Ériu 43 (1992), p. 211.
son ‘happy’ and antonym don; cf. sona/dona.

sona

1192.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: V. 1. OIr. sondon.
In Ériu 43 (1992), p. 211.
son ‘happy’ and antonym don; cf. sona/dona.

sonairt

1236.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: III. 1. On non-compounding with negatives.
In Ériu 44 (1993), p. 177.
On privative of nert, énirt < *é(n)nertˊ with vocalism of simplex; contrast sonairt ‘strong’ (cf. E. P. Hamp, in ÉtC 29 (1992) pp. 215-217).
Hamp (E. P.) (ref.)
3119.
Hamp (Eric P.): Gaulish sunartiu.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 215–221.
Concerns Old Irish derivates of nert: sonairt, sonartae, fornert, fornairt. Includes an appendix on the Celtic reflexes for the Proto-Indo-European syllabic sonants.

sonartae

3119.
Hamp (Eric P.): Gaulish sunartiu.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 215–221.
Concerns Old Irish derivates of nert: sonairt, sonartae, fornert, fornairt. Includes an appendix on the Celtic reflexes for the Proto-Indo-European syllabic sonants.

*sond

15193.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Two unrecognised Philargyrius glosses.
In Ériu 65 (2015), pp. 127–136.
dus gl. ilice; *suind [MS sum/sunt] gl. fontes. Includes an excursus on scribal Latinization of Irish words.

sop

3250.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 2. OIr. sopp; Faroese soppur; W swp.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 178–181.
Argues that Ir. sop is not a borrowing from ON soppr as stated in DIL but rather a borrowing from L stuppa through Brit-Lat. *suppa; Faroese soppur, Shetland sipp, W swp, sypyn are to be regarded as Viking age borrowings from Irish.

sopp

3250.
Greene (David): Varia: III. 2. OIr. sopp; Faroese soppur; W swp.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 178–181.
Argues that Ir. sop is not a borrowing from ON soppr as stated in DIL but rather a borrowing from L stuppa through Brit-Lat. *suppa; Faroese soppur, Shetland sipp, W swp, sypyn are to be regarded as Viking age borrowings from Irish.
3721.
Lockwood (W. B.): Chr. Matras’ studies on the Gaelic element in Faroese: conclusions and results.
In SGS 13/1 (Autumn 1978), pp. 112–126.
Surveys eight publications by Christian Matras (1900-1988) on Irish loan words in Faeroese, focusing particularly on the loans from dronn, bláthach, *slabac, dais, cró, tarb, ScG làmh chearr (< OIr. *lám cherr), muirean (or muirín, muiríneach, etc.), sopp, áirge.
Matras (Christian) (ref.)

sor

3009.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 15. Baskisch-Keltische Etymologien.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 85–87.
OIr. sor, sar, sarachán; berbad, bruth; lágha, láighe.

sorcair (ScG)

879.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 6. sorcóir.
In Ériu 35 (1984), p. 199.
Ir. sorcóir, sorcoir and ScG sorcair ‘cylinder’ < roireoir (< roileoir), based on a miss-spelling by E. Lhuyd.

sorcóir

879.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 6. sorcóir.
In Ériu 35 (1984), p. 199.
Ir. sorcóir, sorcoir and ScG sorcair ‘cylinder’ < roireoir (< roileoir), based on a miss-spelling by E. Lhuyd.

sorcoir

879.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 6. sorcóir.
In Ériu 35 (1984), p. 199.
Ir. sorcóir, sorcoir and ScG sorcair ‘cylinder’ < roireoir (< roileoir), based on a miss-spelling by E. Lhuyd.

sornán (Mu) (ghost word)

1950.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Two Gaelic fish.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 105–112.
1. Mainisín [< Engl. Rom. manishee ‘woman’]; 2. Sornan [< Sc thornie].

sòrnan (ScG)

1950.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Two Gaelic fish.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 105–112.
1. Mainisín [< Engl. Rom. manishee ‘woman’]; 2. Sornan [< Sc thornie].

soscéle

290.
Kavanagh (Séamus): Notae Wirziburgenses.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 12–18.
1. Wb. 1a6; 2. Wb. 13d27, 21b4; 3. Wb. 25a6; 4. Wb. 26d10, 26d11; 5. Wb. 16a10; 6. Wb. soscéle [masc. io-stem].
2929.
Bammesberger (Alfred): Vieil irlandais sacart et vieil anglais sacerd.
In ÉtC 16 (1979), pp. 187–189.
Argues that OE sacerd is a loanword from Old Irish.
6159.
Sonderegger (Stefan): Die Bedeutung des religiösen Wortschatzes für die Entfaltung des Althochdeutschen: von früher Vielfalt zu allmählicher Vereinheitlichung.
In Die Kirche im Frühmittelalter (1984), pp. 240–257.
Contains an excursus on the translation of Lat. evangelium into High Old German, in which considers the mediation of OIr. soscéle.

soss

4172.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 10. soss ‘cessation’.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 183.

sostán

12452.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí: II. Dhá fhocal.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 296–297.
1. stán; 2. *clódhghalar.

Sound of Harris

10678.
MacKillop (Donald): Rocks, skerries, shoals and islands in the sounds of Harris and Uist and around the island of Berneray.
In TGSI 56 (1989–1990), pp. 428–502.
A collection of place-names.

Sound of Uist

10678.
MacKillop (Donald): Rocks, skerries, shoals and islands in the sounds of Harris and Uist and around the island of Berneray.
In TGSI 56 (1989–1990), pp. 428–502.
A collection of place-names.

Soutra

13794.
Breeze (Andrew): Scottish place-names: the way ahead.
In Doonsin’ emerauds (2004), pp. 18–23.
Discusses the following Scottish place-names: 1. Noss Head, Piltanton Burn, Bennachie, and Dunscanby Head; 2. Arran, Cumnock, Girvan, and Irvine; 3. Loquhariot; 4. Pennango and Soutra.
6695.
Breeze (Andrew): The names of Bellshill, Carmichael, Lauder and Soutra.
In IR 51/1 (Spring 2000), pp. 72–79.
1. The name of Bellshill, near Motherwell; 2. The name of Carmichael, near Lanark; 3. The name of Lauder, Borders; 4. Soutra in Lothian and Dinsol in Culhwch and Olwen.

Soutra, Midlothian

4444.
Breeze (Andrew): Three Celtic names: Venicones, Tuesis and Soutra.
In ScotL 25 (2006), pp. 71–79.
[1.] The Venicones, a people of Tayside; [2.] Ptolemy’s Tuesis and the river Spey; [3.] Soutra, near Edinburgh.

s(o)uxt- (Gaul)

2573.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): A Gaulish-Gaelic correspondence: s(o)uxt- and suac(hd)an.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 103–117.
ad P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189-192. The apparent divergence of the Scottish Gaelic reflexes is explained by the merger of historical c and chd/cht.

s(o)uxtu (Gaul)

1433.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Varia: III. Gaulish souxtu: Early Irish suacht.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189–192.
Late Gaulish s(o)uxtu, possibly meaning ‘cooking pot’, in a text dated to the middle of the 2nd c. ad related to EIr. suacht ‘vat, trough ?', and possibly also to ScG suacan ‘earthen pot, crucible, etc.' and Ir. suacán ‘pot’. Cf. P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 54, (2004), pp. 263-264.

spailp

12372.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Spailpín 'spalpeen’ and other words beginning in sp-.
In Celtica 27 (2013), pp. 154–157.
Argues that three different words [(i) speilp, spailp ‘covering; bout, spell’ (> spailpín); (ii) speilp ‘wealth’; (iii) spalp ‘burst forth’] have been conflated in modern Irish dictionaries under the lemmata speilp and spailp.

spailpín

12372.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Spailpín 'spalpeen’ and other words beginning in sp-.
In Celtica 27 (2013), pp. 154–157.
Argues that three different words [(i) speilp, spailp ‘covering; bout, spell’ (> spailpín); (ii) speilp ‘wealth’; (iii) spalp ‘burst forth’] have been conflated in modern Irish dictionaries under the lemmata speilp and spailp.

spalp

12372.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Spailpín 'spalpeen’ and other words beginning in sp-.
In Celtica 27 (2013), pp. 154–157.
Argues that three different words [(i) speilp, spailp ‘covering; bout, spell’ (> spailpín); (ii) speilp ‘wealth’; (iii) spalp ‘burst forth’] have been conflated in modern Irish dictionaries under the lemmata speilp and spailp.

speilp

12372.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Spailpín 'spalpeen’ and other words beginning in sp-.
In Celtica 27 (2013), pp. 154–157.
Argues that three different words [(i) speilp, spailp ‘covering; bout, spell’ (> spailpín); (ii) speilp ‘wealth’; (iii) spalp ‘burst forth’] have been conflated in modern Irish dictionaries under the lemmata speilp and spailp.

spéir ‘slit or opening’

1855.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Roinnt focal iasachta sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 158–166.
1. beargún/beirgiún/biorgún; 2. béitín/béitíne; 3. meá/meadh/midh/meath; 4. infear; 5. stilliúr; 6. ainsiléad; 7. luaidhe; 8. spéir.

Spey

4444.
Breeze (Andrew): Three Celtic names: Venicones, Tuesis and Soutra.
In ScotL 25 (2006), pp. 71–79.
[1.] The Venicones, a people of Tayside; [2.] Ptolemy’s Tuesis and the river Spey; [3.] Soutra, near Edinburgh.

spiara

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

spícéad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

spideil (ScG) (in place names)

12790.
McNiven (Peter): Spittal place-names in Menteith and Strathendrick: evidence of crusading endowments?
In IR 64/1 (May 2013), pp. 23–38.

spín

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

spirantization

1627.
Harvey (Anthony): Aspects of lenition and spirantization.
In CMCS 8 (Winter 1984), pp. 87–100.
Development in Celtic languages. Cf. D. Greene, Gemination, in Celtica 3 (1956), pp. 284-289; The spirant mutation in Brythonic, in Celtica 7 (1966), pp. 116-119; K. H. Jackson, Gemination and the spirant mutation, in Celtica 5 (1960), pp. 127-134.

spı̄ritus (Lat.)

810.
Mc Manus (Damian): A chronology of the Latin loan-words in Early Irish.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 21–71.
Includes appendix on the borrowing into Irish of Lat. spı̄ritus.

spirut

810.
Mc Manus (Damian): A chronology of the Latin loan-words in Early Irish.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 21–71.
Includes appendix on the borrowing into Irish of Lat. spı̄ritus.

spittal (Sco) (in place names)

12790.
McNiven (Peter): Spittal place-names in Menteith and Strathendrick: evidence of crusading endowments?
In IR 64/1 (May 2013), pp. 23–38.

spiurt

810.
Mc Manus (Damian): A chronology of the Latin loan-words in Early Irish.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 21–71.
Includes appendix on the borrowing into Irish of Lat. spı̄ritus.

splincéara

436.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 1–10.
1. bleachtaire, miolcaire; 2. bráca; 3. burdún; 4. cailpís; 5. cáipéis/cáipís; 6. daorach; 7. malach; 8. ninsceachán, ninsci, ninscim, etc.; 9. painéad; 10. pasálann; 11. pasúr; 12. slincín; 13. splincéara; 14. sprioc; 15. trantal.

spochaidh

2601.
Greene (David): Modern Irish cailleann and coilleann.
In ZCP 37 (1979), pp. 5–9.
Examines the doublet cailleann and coilleann (both < OIr. coillid) and argues it results from semantic split.

spoiled priest (Hib-Engl)

1783.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 379–383.
1. léas; 2. léasann; 3. Saibhir; 4. Gléachás / gléacas / gléachas; 5. ‘lashings’; 6. 'spoiled priest’.

sprioc

436.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 1–10.
1. bleachtaire, miolcaire; 2. bráca; 3. burdún; 4. cailpís; 5. cáipéis/cáipís; 6. daorach; 7. malach; 8. ninsceachán, ninsci, ninscim, etc.; 9. painéad; 10. pasálann; 11. pasúr; 12. slincín; 13. splincéara; 14. sprioc; 15. trantal.

spyrryd (Mx)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

sr-

1322.
Watson (Seosamh): Cairn rs, sr i gcanúintí na Gaeilge.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 121–136.

sracaire

11734.
Breeze (Andrew): Dunbar’s brylyoun, carrybald, cawandaris, slawsy, strekouris, and traikit.
In N&Q 54/2 (Jun. 2007), pp. 125–128.
< Ir. brillín, carbad, caileantóir, slusaí, sracaire, tréig.

srádbhaile

1297.
Byrne (Francis John): Onomastica 1: An Srádbhaile ‘Dundalk’.
In Peritia 1 (1982), p. 159.
Argues that srádbhaile mentioned in Mac Carthaigh’s Book, s.a. 1210 (Misc. Ir. Ann. 88-89), is the common noun, not a reference to Sráidbhaile Dúna Dealgan (= Dundalk).

sraenán

9598.
Sayers (William): Games, sport and para-military exercise in early Ireland.
In Aethlon 10/1 (Fall 1992), pp. 105–123.
Reviews D. Binchy's discussion (in Celtica 8.144) of the terms for games and sports named in Mellbretha: 1. lúb, líathróit; 2. corthe críche; 3. tochailt trebán; 4. lém; 5. snám; 6. sraenán; 7. brandub; 8. fidchell; 9. buanfach; 10. folach migán; 11. immarchor uanán; 12. ardchless co n-ublaib; 13. bocluasc; 14. echréim; 15. cor cloiche; 16. dréim; 17. léim; 18. díbirciud; 19. uathad fri hilar; 20. crosdibirciud; 21. táithe tuilche; 22. bundsach i n-airecht.

Appendix: A synthetic version of the lists of martial feats (cles) as found in the Ulster cycle of tales.

Sráidbhaile Dúna Dealgan

1297.
Byrne (Francis John): Onomastica 1: An Srádbhaile ‘Dundalk’.
In Peritia 1 (1982), p. 159.
Argues that srádbhaile mentioned in Mac Carthaigh’s Book, s.a. 1210 (Misc. Ir. Ann. 88-89), is the common noun, not a reference to Sráidbhaile Dúna Dealgan (= Dundalk).

Sraif

4672.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): Some problems in deciphering the early Irish Ogam alphabet.
In TPhS 91/2 (Nov. 1993), pp. 133–180.
Discusses in particular the transliteration of the letter Fern, and the Primitive Irish phonemic value represented by the letters Gétal, S(t)raif and (h)Úath.

sraithi

691.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. A note on Old Irish sraithi, sraithius.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 142–144.
ad C. Watkins, in Ériu 18 (1958), pp. 85-101 (cf. BILL 3261).
Watkins (Calvert) (ref.)
3462.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. Syntactic comparisons: (b) sraithi, sraithius.
In Ériu 26 (1975), p. 169.
ad C. Watkins, in Ériu 18 (1958), pp. 92-93 (BILL 3261).

sraithius

691.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. A note on Old Irish sraithi, sraithius.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 142–144.
ad C. Watkins, in Ériu 18 (1958), pp. 85-101 (cf. BILL 3261).
Watkins (Calvert) (ref.)
3462.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. Syntactic comparisons: (b) sraithi, sraithius.
In Ériu 26 (1975), p. 169.
ad C. Watkins, in Ériu 18 (1958), pp. 92-93 (BILL 3261).

srath

9545.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): A lexical trek through some early Irish ‘valleys’.
In Dán do oide [Ó Cléirigh essays] (1997), pp. 325–336.
glenn; fán; fánglenn; fánaid; cobfán; srath.

sreb

4168.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 5. sreb, srib.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 182.

srebann

4427.
Breeze (Andrew): Etymological notes on Kirkcaldy, jocteleg ‘knife’, kiaugh ‘trouble’, striffen ‘membrane’ and cow ‘hobgolin’.
In ScotL 16 (1997), pp. 97–110.
Suggests Scots kiaugh, striffen, are Gaelic loan words (< ciach, srebann).

srib

4168.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. 5. sreb, srib.
In Ériu 36 (1985), p. 182.

sriobh

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sriobha(i)ll

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

srón

3331.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 6. Lith. nasraı̃, Slav. nozd(ı̆)ri, OIr. srón, Gk. ῥΐς.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 275–278.

sròn (ScG) (in place names)

4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

srúb

11806.
Jørgensen (Anders R.): Breton fri ‘nose’, Welsh ffriw ‘face’, Old Irish srúb ‘snout’.
In KF 5 (2010–2012), pp. 189–196.

Srúb Brain

9791.
Hellmuth (Petra S.): The Dindshenchas and Irish literary tradition.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 116–126.
Examines the dinnshenchas of Srúb Brain.

srúill

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruithem

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

srùlach (ScG)

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruth

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruth di aill

5832.
Ó hAodha (Donncha): An bhairdne i dtús a ré.
In LCC 24 (1994), pp. 9–20.
Discusses the metrical tract entitled Córus bard cona bairdne (Mittelirische Verslehren I, ed. by R. Thurneysen 1891 [Best1, p. 53]). Includes a list of the metres associated with every grade.

Sruth na Maoile

2243.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): ‘Maoil’ i logainmneacha: focal a chiallaíonn sruth?
In Ainm 1 (1986), pp. 3–13.
An Mhaoil ‘Moyle’, An Mhaoil Rua, Sruth na Maoile, Cúil Mhuine, Rinn Mhaoile, Oitir na Maoile, An Mhaoil ‘The Minch’, Mullach Íde, etc.

Addendum in Ainm 2 (1987), pp. 132-135.

sruthail

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruthair

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruthar (ScG)

11720.
Breeze (Andrew): Chaucer’s strother and Berwickshire.
In N&Q 56/1 (Mar. 2009), pp. 21–23.
OED strother < ScG sruthar.

sruthlach (ScG)

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruthladh (ScG)

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

srù(th)lag (ScG)

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruthlag (ScG)

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

sruthlú

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

St. Awaries

7642.
Ó Crualaoich (Conchubhar): Shemoge’s and St. Awarie’s: one case of mistaken identity and one case of sharp intuition?
In The past 27 (2006), pp. 39–49.
On the origin of Díomóg/Modhíomóg of Cluain Caoin Ara and on the Co, Wexford place names St. Imoge or Shemoge, St. Awaries and Lady’s Island.

St. Imoge

7642.
Ó Crualaoich (Conchubhar): Shemoge’s and St. Awarie’s: one case of mistaken identity and one case of sharp intuition?
In The past 27 (2006), pp. 39–49.
On the origin of Díomóg/Modhíomóg of Cluain Caoin Ara and on the Co, Wexford place names St. Imoge or Shemoge, St. Awaries and Lady’s Island.

St. Patrick’s anvil

1707.
Williams (N. J. A.): Leagan cainte in Párliament na mban.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), p. 330.
vs. B. Ó Cuív, Párliament na mBan (Dublin 1952), 146; dar an eóruinn (l. 2357) ‘by the anvil’ (i.e. ‘by St. Patrick’s anvil’); eóruinn < inneoir < inneoin ‘anvil’.
Ó Cuív (B.) (ref.)

sta (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

stair

11411.
Thomsett (Harriet): Meeting on whose terms? The equation of Latin and vernacular literary terminology in the Old Irish glosses.
In Quaestio insularis 3 (2002), pp. 107–120.
On the association of OIr. stoir, argamaint, scél, with L historia, argumentum, fabula in the Old Irish glosses.

stán

12452.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí: II. Dhá fhocal.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 296–297.
1. stán; 2. *clódhghalar.

staoighle (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

sta-ta (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

steama

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

stearnal (ScG)

3713.
Lockwood (W. B.): Ptarmigan and other Gaelic names.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn 1976), pp. 271–278.
Bird-names: Engl. ptarmigan (< ScG tarmachan), tairmid, stearnal, amhas, asaileag, buigeir, dìrid.

steiling

7926.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): A footnote to A glass of beer.
In IUR 9/1 (Spring 1979), pp. 42–43.

Stermond (in William Worcestre)

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

stilliúir

1855.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Roinnt focal iasachta sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 158–166.
1. beargún/beirgiún/biorgún; 2. béitín/béitíne; 3. meá/meadh/midh/meath; 4. infear; 5. stilliúr; 6. ainsiléad; 7. luaidhe; 8. spéir.

stinnle

7926.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): A footnote to A glass of beer.
In IUR 9/1 (Spring 1979), pp. 42–43.

Stirling

1596.
Jackson (Kenneth): Varia: I. Bede’s Urbs Giudi: Stirling or Cramond?
In CMCS 2 (Winter 1981), pp. 1–7.
Restates the argument that Urbs Giudi is to be identified as Stirling.

stob (ScG) (in place names)

4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

stoir

11411.
Thomsett (Harriet): Meeting on whose terms? The equation of Latin and vernacular literary terminology in the Old Irish glosses.
In Quaestio insularis 3 (2002), pp. 107–120.
On the association of OIr. stoir, argamaint, scél, with L historia, argumentum, fabula in the Old Irish glosses.

stop-shift (Scots)

211.
Pődör (Dóra): The phonology of Scottish Gaelic loanwords in Lowland Scots.
In ScotL 14–15 (1995–1996), pp. 174–189.
1. Introduction; 2. Medial and final th [θ]; 3. Medial and final non-palatal dh [ð]; 4. Medial and final palatal dh [ðˊ]; 5. The stop shift; 6. The epenthetic vowel; [7.] Conclusion.

*stor (ghost word)

8579.
Breeze (Andrew): A Brittonic etymology for Old English stor ‘incense’.
In Anglia 116/2 (1998), pp. 227–230.
Rejects Max Förster's view (in Englische Studien 70 (1935), pp. 49-54) that this is an Irish loan word.

Stormont (Perthshire)

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

strabóig

12348.
Ó Muirithe (Diarmaid): Varia: V. Suggested etymological links for some Irish words.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 269–272.
druing, droing; glioscarnach; gruaim; goin; húiste; muiríoll; roc; strabóig; tascal-money.

Straif

4672.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): Some problems in deciphering the early Irish Ogam alphabet.
In TPhS 91/2 (Nov. 1993), pp. 133–180.
Discusses in particular the transliteration of the letter Fern, and the Primitive Irish phonemic value represented by the letters Gétal, S(t)raif and (h)Úath.

straiféad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

stráiméad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

Straiph

1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.

stráisiún

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

stráisplé `…the show …’

1794.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Notaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 128–135.
Trí fhocal Nua-Ghaeilge: 1. Céimseata. 2. *gutalach. 3. climseáil.

Cúig fhocal ón mBéarla: 1. Rucust / rigeist / rógoiste. 2.Stráisplé. 3. deárlaí. 4. Cleaimideighs. 5. Sifil, sifleálann.

Trí ghnáthleagan cainte ag an bPluincéadach: 1. Cuirim foaina chosaibh. 2. Cac ar aithris. 3. Dhá uillinn.

Strathspey

10692.
McGregor (Neil): Gaelic in Strathspey.
In TGSI 59 (1994–1996), pp. 488–606.
On Gaelic language and culture in Strathpey, including a brief description of the dialect and a discussion of the reasons for its decline.
10688.
Macgregor (Neil): Gaelic place-names in Strathspey.
In TGSI 58 (1993–1994), pp. 299–370.
Offers a discussion of the place-name elements in Strathpey, followed by a detailed survey of particular parts of the district: Glen More and Ryvoan; Loch A’an to Nethy Bridge; Braes of Abernethy; Tulloch.

striffen (Sco)

4427.
Breeze (Andrew): Etymological notes on Kirkcaldy, jocteleg ‘knife’, kiaugh ‘trouble’, striffen ‘membrane’ and cow ‘hobgolin’.
In ScotL 16 (1997), pp. 97–110.
Suggests Scots kiaugh, striffen, are Gaelic loan words (< ciach, srebann).

Stroanshesk

2319.
Mac Gabhann (Fiachra): Logainmneacha i gceantar Bhaile Chaisleáin a thit as feidhm.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 108–112.
Drumargy, Drumnacross, Gortrumine, Holm, Portbrittas, Stroanshesk.

stroimpiléad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

strúiméad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

struipléad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.

s(t)rùladh (ScG)

1486.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Modern Irish srúill.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 241–244.
Srúill ‘stream, etc.' < sriobhall < sriobh; sruthlú ‘rinse’ < sruth ‘stream’. ScG sruthladh (vn), sruthlach (adj.) ‘rinsing’ and ‘violent motion of the sea’; ScG srùlach (adj.) ‘flowing, etc.', srù(th)lag, sruthlag ‘rivulet’, s(t)rùladh ‘swell of sea’; sru- < sruth; srù- most likely derive from sriobhall but with possible phonetic and semantic contamination between both sets of forms. Shrule in Ir pl.ns < srúill < sriobha(i)ll or possibly < sruthail < sruthair ‘stream’.

strúsín

1854.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 150–157.
I. Sé fhocal ón iasacht: 1. batam; 2. blámás/plámás; 3. gríscín; 4. leibhit, leibhiteáil; 5. strúsín; 6. treiscín.

II. Cúig leagan cainte: 1. dhá chuid; 2. dhá leath; 3. dhá leor; 4. duine agus duine; 5. m’athair agus iad .

Stua Laighean

7623.
de hÓir (Éamonn): Nóta faoin ainm Stua Laighean.
In The past 9 (1972), pp. 60–64.
On the name Mount Leinster.

stuc (ScG) (in place names)

4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

suacán

1433.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Varia: III. Gaulish souxtu: Early Irish suacht.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189–192.
Late Gaulish s(o)uxtu, possibly meaning ‘cooking pot’, in a text dated to the middle of the 2nd c. ad related to EIr. suacht ‘vat, trough ?', and possibly also to ScG suacan ‘earthen pot, crucible, etc.' and Ir. suacán ‘pot’. Cf. P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 54, (2004), pp. 263-264.

suacan (ScG)

1433.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Varia: III. Gaulish souxtu: Early Irish suacht.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189–192.
Late Gaulish s(o)uxtu, possibly meaning ‘cooking pot’, in a text dated to the middle of the 2nd c. ad related to EIr. suacht ‘vat, trough ?', and possibly also to ScG suacan ‘earthen pot, crucible, etc.' and Ir. suacán ‘pot’. Cf. P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 54, (2004), pp. 263-264.
2573.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): A Gaulish-Gaelic correspondence: s(o)uxt- and suac(hd)an.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 103–117.
ad P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189-192. The apparent divergence of the Scottish Gaelic reflexes is explained by the merger of historical c and chd/cht.

suachdan (ScG)

2573.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): A Gaulish-Gaelic correspondence: s(o)uxt- and suac(hd)an.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 103–117.
ad P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189-192. The apparent divergence of the Scottish Gaelic reflexes is explained by the merger of historical c and chd/cht.

suachgan (ScG)

2573.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): A Gaulish-Gaelic correspondence: s(o)uxt- and suac(hd)an.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 103–117.
ad P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189-192. The apparent divergence of the Scottish Gaelic reflexes is explained by the merger of historical c and chd/cht.

suacht

1433.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Varia: III. Gaulish souxtu: Early Irish suacht.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189–192.
Late Gaulish s(o)uxtu, possibly meaning ‘cooking pot’, in a text dated to the middle of the 2nd c. ad related to EIr. suacht ‘vat, trough ?', and possibly also to ScG suacan ‘earthen pot, crucible, etc.' and Ir. suacán ‘pot’. Cf. P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 54, (2004), pp. 263-264.
2573.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): A Gaulish-Gaelic correspondence: s(o)uxt- and suac(hd)an.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 103–117.
ad P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189-192. The apparent divergence of the Scottish Gaelic reflexes is explained by the merger of historical c and chd/cht.
2538.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Varia: V. Gaulish souxtu: addendum.
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 263–264.
OIr. suacht; ad P.-Y. Lambert, in Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 189-192.
4152.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: 3. An Old Irish attestation of suacht, in Félire Óengusso.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 161–163.
Reads a suacht ‘out of a receptacle’ in Fél. Apr. 19.
5151.
Jørgensen (Anders Richardt): Varia: III. An additional cognate of Gaulish souxtu and Irish suacht: Old Cornish seit.
In Ériu 58 (2008), pp. 183–185.

Suadbar

14976.
Howlett (David), Ireland (Colin) (app. auth.): Two Irish jokes.
In Early medieval Ireland and Europe [Fs. Ó Cróinín] (2015), pp. 225–264.
In Appendix: The Irish names in Suadbar’s letter, by Colin Ireland [Caunchobrach, Fergus, Dominnach, Suadbar].

súainem

4770.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (1. Teil).
In Sprache 43/2 (2002–2003), pp. 171–211.
Collects and analyses instances of agent nouns in -em: Prototypen bzw. frühere Bildungen (ainim(m)/anaim(m), talam); Bekannte und gesicherte -amon und -(i)i̯amon-Bildungen (airem, betham, brithem, cairem, dáilem, dúilem, féchem, fethem, flaithem, glaídem, legam, luam, medam, mraithem, orb(b)am, súainem).

Continued in Die Sprache 44 (2004), 26-69.

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

suairc

7126.
McQuillan (Peter): Suairceas in the seventeenth century.
In Field Day review 2 (2006), pp. 94–109.
10154.
Mac Cuillinn (Peadar): Gnéithe de na focail suairc agus suairceas sa 18ú haois.

suairceas

7126.
McQuillan (Peter): Suairceas in the seventeenth century.
In Field Day review 2 (2006), pp. 94–109.
10154.
Mac Cuillinn (Peadar): Gnéithe de na focail suairc agus suairceas sa 18ú haois.
11642.
Mac Cuillinn (Peadar): Begriffsgeschichte na Gaeilge? : athchuairt ar an suairceas.

súaitrech

13611.
Breeze (Andrew): Notes on some cruces in Middle Scots poetry: Henryson’s Bawdronis, dart oxin and bacis, Dunbar’s Strenever and Wallidrag, Gavin Douglas’s Lundeys Lufe, Threte and Treilʓeis.
In ScotL 29 (2010), pp. 1–15.
[1.] Henryson’s Bawdronis the cat [not < Ir. beadrach]; [2.] Henryson’s dart oxin [< Ir. dairt]; [3.] bacis in Henryson’s The annunciation; [4.] Dunbar’s Strenever; [5.] Wallydrag ‘good-fot-nothing’ and Gaelic [< MIr. súaitrech]; [6.] Gavin Douglas’s Of Lundeys Lufe; [7.] Gavin Douglas’s in threte [< Ir. i dtraite]; [8.] Gavin Douglas’s Treilʓeis [< Ir. trilis].

suantraidhe

15171.
Boyd (Matthieu): The logic of suantraidhe agus goltraidhe.
In PHCC 33 (2014), pp. 52–69.

súas

903.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. turgaire ‘act of inciting’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), p. 183.
771.
Ahlqvist (Anders): On adverbs of place in Irish.
In ZCP 35 (1976), pp. 158–168.
Examines the Irish adverbs of place, with particular emphasis on the directional prefixes t-, s-, an-.

suas (ScG)

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.
10699.
Grant (James): The Gaelic of Strathspey and it relationship with other dialects.
In TGSI 61 (1998–2000), pp. 71–115.
Focuses on nineteen distinctive features of the Strathspey dialect:

1. Dropping of final unstressed vowel; 2. Dropping of vowel in -as ending; 3. Dropping of -adh ending; 4. He/it (m) (emphatic form) [ScG eise]; 5. They (pronunciation) [ScG aid]; 6. Independent future ending [-(e)as]; 7 & 8: Preaspiration; 9. Breaking of long é; 10. bh vocalized to u; 11. Final slender nn pronounced as ng; 12. Broad s becomes z (when preceded by n); 13. f becomes b (when preceded by m; 14. Playing [ScG. a’ cluich]; 15. Children [ScG cloinn]; 16. Down(wards) [ScG a-bhàn]; 17. East(wards) and west(wards) [ScG sìos, suas]; 18. (Fresh) water [bùrn]; 19. Boy [ScG praitseach].

súgmaire

3442.
Borsje (Jacqueline): The movement of water as symbolised by monsters in early Irish texts.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 153–170.
Discusses the development of the motif of sea-monsters that move water, arguing that, although there are early references to the classical Charybdis in Hiberno-Latin texts, the connection of the two concepts is first seen in the muirdris of Echtra Fergusa maic Léti.

suí

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

suí (ina shuí)

1690.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Tá sé ina shuí, etc.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 89–103.
ad N. McGonagle, in Éigse 16/3 (1976), pp. 218-220.

Suí Laighean

7623.
de hÓir (Éamonn): Nóta faoin ainm Stua Laighean.
In The past 9 (1972), pp. 60–64.
On the name Mount Leinster.

Suibhne Geilt

1730.
Partridge (Angela): Wild men and wailing women.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 25–37.
1197.
Sayers (William): Varia: VII. The deficient ruler as avian exile: Nebuchadnezzar and Suibhne Geilt.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 217–220.

Suibne [Geilt]

1758.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): The wisdom of the geilt.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 44–60.

Suibne Geilt

1791.
Carey (John): Suibne Geilt and Tuán mac Cairill.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 93–105.
3167.
Sailer (Susan Shaw): Leaps, curses and flight: Suibne Geilt and the roots of early Irish culture.
In ÉtC 33 (1997), pp. 191–208.
Discusses beliefs and practices concerning curses, leaping and flight as they occur in Buile Suibne and in early Christian material.
7661.
Sailer (Susan Shaw): Suibne Geilt: puzzles, problems and paradoxes.
In CJIS/RCÉI 24/1 (1998), pp. 115–131.
Focuses on Suibne’s historicity and the nature of his madness.

suide

5320.
Greene (David): The chariot as described in Irish literature.
In Iron age in the Irish sea province (1972), pp. 59–73.
Discusses the terms dá ech, carpat, dá ndroch, fonnaid, sithbe, feirtsi, crett, cuing, dá n-all, clár, suide, etruide, éissi, brot.
12545.
Griffith (Aaron): Irish suide/-side ‘the aforementioned’.

Suide Find

18375.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth), Hennessy (Ronan): Finn’s Seat: topographies of power and royal marchlands of Gaelic polities in medieval Ireland.
In LH 38/2 (2017), pp. 29–62.
Investigates hilltop cairns and mounds named Suidhe Finn which were used as boundary landmarks. Includes a case study of the landscape of the hill of Almhain and its summit mound of Suidhe Finn in North Leinster.

Suidhe Finn

18375.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth), Hennessy (Ronan): Finn’s Seat: topographies of power and royal marchlands of Gaelic polities in medieval Ireland.
In LH 38/2 (2017), pp. 29–62.
Investigates hilltop cairns and mounds named Suidhe Finn which were used as boundary landmarks. Includes a case study of the landscape of the hill of Almhain and its summit mound of Suidhe Finn in North Leinster.

suidhe (ina shuidhe)

1565.
McGonagle (Noel): Three Ulster features.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
1. Lenition after iongantach [and millteanach]; 2. i bhfus: On the development from adverb to quaisi-imperative: 'here’ > 'give me’; 3. Tá mé ina shuidhe: On the generalisation of 3rd masc. poss. in ina shuidhe, ina sheasamh, etc. in Ulster and Man.

súil

2976.
Bammesberger (Alfred): Le mot irlandais désignant l’œil.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 155–157.
Argues in favour of a semantic evolution sun > eye to support the derivation of OIr. súil ‘eye’ from PIE *sāwel/sūl- ‘sun’.
3213.
Hamp (Eric P.): Indo-European *āu̯ before consonant in British and Indo-European ‘sun’.
In BBCS 26/2 (May 1975), pp. 97–102.
Discussion of Celtic evidence includes OIr. súil (< *suHali-).
9763.
Matasović (Ranko): ‘Sun’ and ‘moon’ in Celtic and Indo-European.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 2 (2009), pp. 154–162.
10021.
Beekes (R. S. P.): PIE ‘sun’.
In MSS 43 (1984), pp. 5–8.
OIr. súil.
11993.
Zair (Nicholas): British *-āu̯-, *-āg- and the Celtic words for ‘sun’.
In Sprache 49/2 (2010–2011), pp. 194–216.
Appendix: Other Celtic words for ‘sun’ [OIr. súil].
12342.
Mag Eacháin (Conchúr): Téarmaí duáin.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 188–198.
1. friofac / ruthag / ruaibh(r)ic, srl.; 2. craobhóg; 3. crúca; 4. fiochrán; 5. fioradh an duáin; 6. freithiún; 7. frídín, fríde; 8. frithionga; 9. friochan; 10. gob an duáin; 11. ionga; 12. luiseag; 13. lusa; 14. slip; 15. súil; 16. teanga.

súil (fhéig) andíaraid

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

súil ghleóir

1737.
Breatnach (R. A.): Roinnt focal Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 99–110.
[1] Glórshúil ; [2] Cuirim in iúl ; [3] Barróg; [4] Fínné ; [5] Césmuite.

Add. & corr. in Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 308.

súil miledach

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

súil milltech

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

súil neimnech

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

suim

506.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Focail i saothar Dháibhidh Uí Bhruadair.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 461–464.
1. atharrach; 2. feidheal; 3. gail; 4. saltair; 5. scaradh; 6. suim.

Suithchern ingen Áeda Bennáin

2594.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): Suithchern and Rónán Dícolla.
In ZCP 36 (1978), pp. 63–82.
Provides transcripts of two fragmentary texts from MS RIA D. iv. 1 (b), namely (A) a story concerning Suithchern, daughter of Áed Bennáin, and (B) the two last episodes of the Munster version of Imtheachta na nÓinmhideadh. With English translation.

*sukko-

1414.
Testen (David): Stem-final *-kk- in Celtic terms for ‘pig’.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 161–164.
Proposes etymologies for *mokku- > Ir. mucc, and *sukko- > W hwch (cf. Ir. socc ‘ploughshare, snout’).

sùl (ScG)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

sula dtí

788.
Mac Congáil (Nollaig): Varia: VII. go dtige agus sula dtí.
In Ériu 32 (1981), p. 176.
ad T. de Bhaldraithe, in Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 168-169. On the use of go dtige, go dtigidh, go dtí as a preposition in Donegal Irish, and sula dtí, sulmá dtí in North Connacht.
de Bhaldraithe (T.) (ref.)

sùlair (ScG)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.
3713.
Lockwood (W. B.): Ptarmigan and other Gaelic names.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn 1976), pp. 271–278.
Bird-names: Engl. ptarmigan (< ScG tarmachan), tairmid, stearnal, amhas, asaileag, buigeir, dìrid.

*sùlan (ScG)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

sulmá dtí

788.
Mac Congáil (Nollaig): Varia: VII. go dtige agus sula dtí.
In Ériu 32 (1981), p. 176.
ad T. de Bhaldraithe, in Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 168-169. On the use of go dtige, go dtigidh, go dtí as a preposition in Donegal Irish, and sula dtí, sulmá dtí in North Connacht.
de Bhaldraithe (T.) (ref.)

suppletion (in verbal system)

2373.
Veselinović (Elvira): Suppletion im irischen Verb.
Philologia, 55. Hamburg: Kovač, 2003. v + 308 pp.
Rev. by
Erich Poppe, in JCeltL 8 (2004), pp. 149-154.
Karl Horst Schmidt, in ZCP 55 (2006), pp. 287-291.
Karin Stüber, in Kratylos 51 (2006), pp. 217-220.

swēro/ā

1093.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. 1. Archaic Irish ferba fíra: a speculative note.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 123–125.
vs. C. Watkins, in G. Cardona and N. H. Zide (eds.), Festschrift for Henry Hoenigswald (Tübingen 1987), 403; takes fíra to be acc. pl. fem. of adjective *wı̄ro/ā- < PIE *swēro/ā- ‘heavy’.

syncope

534.
Greene (David): Varia: III. A detail of syncope.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 232–234.
Discussion of ia in unstressed syllables in OIr., including disyllabic forms in ïa, e.g. in verbal forms foídiam, égthiar, dringthiar, rigthier; also discusses relationship between -bïad and -betis of the substantive verb.
1718.
Carney (James): Aspects of Archaic Irish.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), pp. 417–435.
Statutory public lecture of the School of Celtic Studies, 1978. On syncope and the ‘trisyllabic factor’ in Archaic Irish verse; includes a discussion of Bergin’s law.

syncope, initial

1799.
Ó Sé (Diarmuid): Coimriú siollaí tosaigh sa Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 171–186.

Synod of Kells (1152)

1721.
O’Sullivan (Anne): Limerick, Killaloe and Kells 1194–1250.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), pp. 451–455.
Extracts of annalistic entries concerning the dioceses of Limerick and Killaloe, and a list of bishoprics set up at the Synod of Kells in 1152. Ed. with Engl transl. from MS TCD H 2.12/9.