Words and Proper Names

*-n

1413.
Garrett (Andrew): On the prosodic phonology of Ogam Irish.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 139–160.
Three stages in PrimIr. apocope: 1. apocope affects word-final short front vowels (final *-n lost before *-h); 2. apocope occurs at end of phonological phrases; 3. generalisation of phrase-final apocope. Some discussion of initial mutations.

n

1723.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Lenition and dependency phonology.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), pp. 457–494.
[1.] Two-gesture segmental matrix; [2.] Dependency Phonology; [3.] The lenition series in Irish; [4.] Lenition of stops; [5.] Lenition of liquids: /m/ → [ɯ̃]; [6.] Lenition of the liquids: /L N/ → [l n]; [7.] Lenition of the liquids: /R/ → [r]; [8.] Lenition of /s/; [9.] Lenition of /f/; [10.] Lenition in initial clusters; [11.] Summary.

-n-

3081.
Lindeman (Fredrik O.): Varia: 1. On some infixed pronouns in British.
In ÉtC 26 (1989), pp. 73–76.
Discusses the OIr. 2nd and 3rd pl. infix pronouns -s- and -n-.

Republ. in Lindeman studies, pp. 178-181.

/n/ > /r/ after consonants

1965.
Ó Catháin (Brian): Nóta ar r in áit n i nGaeilge Árann.
In Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 98–100.
ad S. Ó Murchú, in Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 95-101. H. Pedersen collected exx. of /r/ for /n/ after consonants in 1895–96.

-n- (preceding poss. adjs)

1060.
Mc Gonagle (Noel): Varia: IV. Réamhfhocail agus aidiachtaí sealbhacha a agus ár.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 199–202.
The insertion of -n- before 3 sg. / pl. and 1 pl. possessive adjectives, usually (though not always) following prepositions ending in a vowel. Compare similar insertion of -án- in Cois Fhairrge.

n’insae

1181.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Discourse markers in medieval Irish texts: cs̄, cair, nı̄, and similar features.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 1–37.
1. Functional identity of cs̄, ces, cesc, and cair; 2. Origin of cair and ces; 3. ce(a)sc; 4. ní insae, ní ansae, ní hannsa; n’insae; 5. Translation, lento style, stylistic variation; 6. ce(a)st, ceist; 7. Conclusions. Incl. index of texts referred to.

na-

2984.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Note phonologique sur le type vieil-irlandais dinad(rícthe).
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 161–163.
Discusses the negative prepositional relatives, especially with regard to the presence of the relative particle in these constructions.

8634.
Malone (Joseph L.): Irish , a disambiguator of perceptually equivocal surface structures.
In SL 4/1 (1980), pp. 25–63.
2198.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Zu den Irischen Negationen.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 111–120.
1. ; 2. nícon; 3. Imperativ und Antwort [na, , nad]; 4. Die Nebensatznegationen: nad, nach; 5. Etymologien; 6. ocus na(ch)/ocus nad; 7. Negative Fragesatze; 8. na statt nad, nach; 9. na ''; 10. na statt ina, arna, usw.

na

2198.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Zu den Irischen Negationen.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 111–120.
1. ; 2. nícon; 3. Imperativ und Antwort [na, , nad]; 4. Die Nebensatznegationen: nad, nach; 5. Etymologien; 6. ocus na(ch)/ocus nad; 7. Negative Fragesatze; 8. na statt nad, nach; 9. na ''; 10. na statt ina, arna, usw.

na aicci

3019.
Hamilton (John Noel): Varia (Alt- und Mittelirisches): 2. A passage in Immram Máile Dúin.
In ZCP 32 (1972), p. 121.
na aicci in A. G. van Hamel's edition (p. 50, l. 837 [Best2 1252]) to be translated as ‘in a short while, in a moment’.

na ‘any’

1009.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish na nní: a case of quid pro quo?
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 168–181.
vs. P. Schrijver's view (in Studies in the History of Celtic Pronouns and Particles, Maynooth 1997) of the alleged neuter i-stem forms (PC *sim > InsC *sin) of the demonstrative *so(-). Also discusses the relevance of the paradigm and derivation of ‘anything, something’ and na ‘any’.
Schrijver (P.) (ref.)

na ba (ScG)

1996.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative in Eastern Gaelic.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 1–6.
The particles used in the formation of the periphrastic comparative in all varieties of E Gaelic derive from a common source: pres. nas < OIr. a n-as; past/cond. na ba < < OIr. a mba.

na nní

1009.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish na nní: a case of quid pro quo?
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 168–181.
vs. P. Schrijver's view (in Studies in the History of Celtic Pronouns and Particles, Maynooth 1997) of the alleged neuter i-stem forms (PC *sim > InsC *sin) of the demonstrative *so(-). Also discusses the relevance of the paradigm and derivation of ‘anything, something’ and na ‘any’.
Schrijver (P.) (ref.)

ná ‘than’

4677.
Laker (Stephen): The English negative comparative particle.
In TPhS 106/1 (Mar. 2008), pp. 1–28.
Assesses the role of Irish in the development of the negative comparative particle in English, and argues that it should be regarded as an areal feature of the languages of Ireland and the British Isles.

na ‘than’

4677.
Laker (Stephen): The English negative comparative particle.
In TPhS 106/1 (Mar. 2008), pp. 1–28.
Assesses the role of Irish in the development of the negative comparative particle in English, and argues that it should be regarded as an areal feature of the languages of Ireland and the British Isles.

Na Tuairiní

12159.
Nic Gearailt (Anselm): Tuilleadh Logainmneacha ó Chiarraí Theas.
In Kerry magazine 5 (1994), p. 40.
Records place names from the townland of Na Tuairiní, Co. Kerry.

nàbaidh (ScG)

4326.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Two loans in Scottish Gaelic.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 305–313.
Discusses the areal distribution of two word pairs consisting of loanword and its native counterpart: 1. nàbaidh and coimhearsnach; 2. cuibheall and roth.

nách

2995.
Greene (David): The responsive in Irish and Welsh.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 59–72.
pp. 60-65: surveys the system of responsive in Early and Modern Irish (including Scottish Gaelic), and argues it continues an archaic state of affairs.

nach

2995.
Greene (David): The responsive in Irish and Welsh.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 59–72.
pp. 60-65: surveys the system of responsive in Early and Modern Irish (including Scottish Gaelic), and argues it continues an archaic state of affairs.
2198.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Zu den Irischen Negationen.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 111–120.
1. ; 2. nícon; 3. Imperativ und Antwort [na, , nad]; 4. Die Nebensatznegationen: nad, nach; 5. Etymologien; 6. ocus na(ch)/ocus nad; 7. Negative Fragesatze; 8. na statt nad, nach; 9. na ''; 10. na statt ina, arna, usw.

nach / go

390.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí gramadaí.
In Celtica 17 (1985), pp. 101–104.
1. Gníomhaí + cuspóir + ainm briathartha; 2. Nóta faoin gcónasc go/nach; 3. Beag ag cáiliú aidiachta; 4. Aidiacht ag cáiliú ainm bhriathartha; 5. An + ainm teibí + mór; 6. Tá siad comh- + ainm teibí.

nacha

3013.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 4. Das negative altir. Präverb nícon ‘non’.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 18–35.
Identifies its original syntactical usage and argues (with R. Thurneysen, GOI §861, vs. D. Greene, in Ériu 21 (1969), pp. 90-92) that it contains the consecutive conjunction co.

nachs (Ul)

1858.
Watson (Seosamh): Foirmeacha athdúbailte copaile i gcanúintí Dhún na nGall.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 194–199.

nacon

3013.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 4. Das negative altir. Präverb nícon ‘non’.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 18–35.
Identifies its original syntactical usage and argues (with R. Thurneysen, GOI §861, vs. D. Greene, in Ériu 21 (1969), pp. 90-92) that it contains the consecutive conjunction co.

nad

3201.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Nodiadau amrywiol: [5.] mi na vi Aneirin.
In BBCS 24/4 (May 1972), pp. 483–484.
On the syntactic pattern of the type X+nad+X ‘X and yet not X’, common to Irish and Welsh.
2995.
Greene (David): The responsive in Irish and Welsh.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 59–72.
pp. 60-65: surveys the system of responsive in Early and Modern Irish (including Scottish Gaelic), and argues it continues an archaic state of affairs.
2198.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Zu den Irischen Negationen.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 111–120.
1. ; 2. nícon; 3. Imperativ und Antwort [na, , nad]; 4. Die Nebensatznegationen: nad, nach; 5. Etymologien; 6. ocus na(ch)/ocus nad; 7. Negative Fragesatze; 8. na statt nad, nach; 9. na ''; 10. na statt ina, arna, usw.

nád

3201.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Nodiadau amrywiol: [5.] mi na vi Aneirin.
In BBCS 24/4 (May 1972), pp. 483–484.
On the syntactic pattern of the type X+nad+X ‘X and yet not X’, common to Irish and Welsh.
2995.
Greene (David): The responsive in Irish and Welsh.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 59–72.
pp. 60-65: surveys the system of responsive in Early and Modern Irish (including Scottish Gaelic), and argues it continues an archaic state of affairs.

nád (n-)

3803.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 2. Old Irish nant, nád, etc.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 165.
ad line 130 of CG. Discusses a deviant use of nád n- as 3rd sg. neg. rel. of the copula.

nad-fendar

1218.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: II. Notae Mediolanenses.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 267–272.
[1.] Ml. 39d7 [nad-fendar]; [2.] Ml. 28b6 [todoichfet], 39d26 [dun-doichfia] deriving from *to-doich-, associated by folk etymology with doich ‘perhaps, probably’.

nad ·fil

3805.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 4. On Scéla mucce Meic Dathó §16, 9 f.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 167.
nad ·fil for nand ·fil.

nadtairlaic don

1234.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. 2. On a possible petrified vestige of an Indo-European syntactical rule in Old Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 168–170.
On the petrified survival of genitive case marking the direct object of a transitive verb: nadtairlaic don lit. ‘which has not yielded ground’ (Ml. 131b2).

nae

14954.
Pyysalo (Jouna): Ten new Indo-European etymologies for the Celtic languages.
In SCF 12 (2015), pp. 62–79.
1. OIr. oenach- ‘an injury/wound’: OSax. ēndago- ‘day of death’: Hitt. ḫingan- ‘Seuche, Pest, Todesfall’; 2. OIr. airecht- ‘assembly, meeting, conversation’: LAv. vyāxa- ‘Versammlung’; 3. OIr. cumachtae- ‘pouvoir, puissance’: TochB. ekaññe ‘possession, equipment’, AV aṣṭi- ‘Erreichung’; 4. OIr. ás- ‘croissance, fait de grandir/grossir’: Maced. ἄξο- ‘ὑλή'; 5. OBret. iolent ‘precentur’: Lat. hariolā- ‘wahrsagen’; 6. MidIr. cīch- (f.) ‘weibliche Brust’: RV. kı̄́kasā- ‘Brust·bein’; 7. OIr. nái- ‘human being, person’: TochA. napen- ‘Mensch’; 8. OIr. tol- ‘Wille’: RV. turá- ‘Willfährig’; 9. OIr. nūadat- ‘hand, wrist or arm’: RV. nodhā- ‘Elefant’; 10. OIr. aiged ‘visage’: OHG agsiunî- ‘species: Aussehen, Angesicht’.

naíden

1528.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Cess Naíden.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), p. 252.
naíden < noínden and the occasional development nd > d in Middle Irish, e.g. (Slíab) Monduirn > (Slíab) Moduirn, Illandon > Illadon, tindnacol > tidnacol.

naidm

3217.
Ford (Patrick K.), Hamp (Eric P.): Welsh asswynaw and Celtic legal idiom.
In BBCS 26/2 (May 1975), pp. 147–160.
Pt.I: Discusses Welsh and Irish idioms for legally bound protection; Pt. II: Etymological discussion (particularly on Ir. aithlech, saigid, snáidid, naidm).
15912.
Breatnach (Liam): On Old Irish collective and abstract nouns, the meaning of cétmuinter, and marriage in early mediaeval Ireland.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 1–29.
I. Discusses the use of words to signify both an abstract concept and a person who embodies it, or both a collective and an individual member of the collective: cerd, dán, díberg, flaith, grád, nemed, ráth, naidm, aitire, cland, eclais, fine, muinter; II. The meaning of cétmuinter [Argues it meant ‘spouse’ and could be applied to both husband and wife].

náit

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

námae

3689.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Celtic *nāmant-.
In ZCP 55 (2006), pp. 18–24.
Discusses the etymology of OIr. námae, arguing that it is a substantivized present participle of a Celtic factitive verb *nāmā-ti ‘puts (someone) in a state of fear’.

namant-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

namanto-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

Námha agus cara dar gceird

409.
Dooley (Ann): Námha agus cara dar gceird: a dán leathaoire.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 125–149.
Critical edition of a late 14th c. poem (42 qq.), from MSS Siena, Biblioteca Comunale G.IX.50, London (private) Sir Con O’Neill, RIA 24 P 21, 23 M 33, 23 L 17, NLI G 430; normalized, with English translation and notes.

nanachs (Ul)

1858.
Watson (Seosamh): Foirmeacha athdúbailte copaile i gcanúintí Dhún na nGall.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 194–199.

nand ·fil

3805.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 4. On Scéla mucce Meic Dathó §16, 9 f.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 167.
nad ·fil for nand ·fil.

nant

3803.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 2. Old Irish nant, nád, etc.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 165.
ad line 130 of CG. Discusses a deviant use of nád n- as 3rd sg. neg. rel. of the copula.

nanti-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

nantu-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

Nappin

5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.

nár

364.
McKenna (Malachy): A note on E. Ulster nar and Old Irish náthar, nár.
In Celtica 16 (1984), p. 52.
Examples from The spiritual rose.
2470.
Carey (John): Two notes on names.
In Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 116–124.
1. Crimthann Nia Náir; 2. Derc Corra.

Nár

2200.
Borsje (Jacqueline): Über die Identität von Nár Túathcháech aus der verlorengegangenen Erzählung Echtrae Chrimthainn Nia Náir.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 169–193.
Examines the characteristics of the various figures named Nár attested in early Irish literature.

nar ('our)

364.
McKenna (Malachy): A note on E. Ulster nar and Old Irish náthar, nár.
In Celtica 16 (1984), p. 52.
Examples from The spiritual rose.

nár nia/néidh

1765.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Leaganacha as Conamara.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 150–158.
I. I gcás go: (a) ‘cé go’; (b) `(cuir) i gcás’. II. Dath ‘cuid’, etc. III. An freagra biorránach.

nas (ScG)

1996.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative in Eastern Gaelic.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 1–6.
The particles used in the formation of the periphrastic comparative in all varieties of E Gaelic derive from a common source: pres. nas < OIr. a n-as; past/cond. na ba < < OIr. a mba.

nas (Ul)

1779.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Northern Irish níos/nios/nas.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 333–340.

nasc

4514.
Bruford (Alan), MacDonald (Donald A.): Nasg: a West Highland tethering device.
In ScS 31 (1992–1993), pp. 136–142.

nasg (ScG)

4514.
Bruford (Alan), MacDonald (Donald A.): Nasg: a West Highland tethering device.
In ScS 31 (1992–1993), pp. 136–142.

nat

3803.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 2. Old Irish nant, nád, etc.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 165.
ad line 130 of CG. Discusses a deviant use of nád n- as 3rd sg. neg. rel. of the copula.

náte

2995.
Greene (David): The responsive in Irish and Welsh.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 59–72.
pp. 60-65: surveys the system of responsive in Early and Modern Irish (including Scottish Gaelic), and argues it continues an archaic state of affairs.

Nath Í mac Fiachrach

1924.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): Aided Nath Í and Uí Fhiachrach genealogies.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 1–27.
Examines the textual tradition of Aided Nath Í and refutes of the historicity of the Amalgaid mac Nath Í in the LU text.

nathair imchenn

1899.
Carey (John): Vernacular Irish learning: three notes.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 37–44.
1. nathair imchenn; 2. compóit mérda 3. brisiud cend for mac fri clocha.

náthar

364.
McKenna (Malachy): A note on E. Ulster nar and Old Irish náthar, nár.
In Celtica 16 (1984), p. 52.
Examples from The spiritual rose.

nathó

2995.
Greene (David): The responsive in Irish and Welsh.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 59–72.
pp. 60-65: surveys the system of responsive in Early and Modern Irish (including Scottish Gaelic), and argues it continues an archaic state of affairs.

Navan

5540.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Odhbha and Navan.
In RíM 8/4 (1992–1993), pp. 112–123.
Argues that Navan and An Uaimh are derivations of the earlier historic name Odhbha.

Navar, Angus

13611.
Breeze (Andrew): Notes on some cruces in Middle Scots poetry: Henryson’s Bawdronis, dart oxin and bacis, Dunbar’s Strenever and Wallidrag, Gavin Douglas’s Lundeys Lufe, Threte and Treilʓeis.
In ScotL 29 (2010), pp. 1–15.
[1.] Henryson’s Bawdronis the cat [not < Ir. beadrach]; [2.] Henryson’s dart oxin [< Ir. dairt]; [3.] bacis in Henryson’s The annunciation; [4.] Dunbar’s Strenever; [5.] Wallydrag ‘good-fot-nothing’ and Gaelic [< MIr. súaitrech]; [6.] Gavin Douglas’s Of Lundeys Lufe; [7.] Gavin Douglas’s in threte [< Ir. i dtraite]; [8.] Gavin Douglas’s Treilʓeis [< Ir. trilis].

nd > d

1528.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Cess Naíden.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), p. 252.
naíden < noínden and the occasional development nd > d in Middle Irish, e.g. (Slíab) Monduirn > (Slíab) Moduirn, Illandon > Illadon, tindnacol > tidnacol.

*ne

1264.
Schrijver (Peter): The Celtic adverbs for ‘against’ and ‘with’ and the early apocope of *-i.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 151–189.
1. The origins of OIr. fri ‘against’, la ‘with’; 2. The early apocope of *-i; 3. The fate of ‘new’ word-final *-t; 4. Examples of *-t(i) > -s in Old Irish; 7. The origin of the Primitive Irish main clause verbal particle *es; 8. The present conjunct forms of the Old Irish copula after *ne ‘not’; 9. Summary.

-ne

17252.
Irslinger (Britta): Les dérivés gallois, cornique en -yn/-en, breton en -enn et irlandais en -ne: fonction et sémantique.
In Bretagne linguistique 15 (2010), pp. 43–81.

Neacht

2728.
Sterckx (Claude): Nûtons, Lûtons et dieux celtes.
In ZCP 46 (1994), pp. 39–79.
Delineates the basic attributes of a Celtic water deity surfacing as Nuadha/Luadha or Neachtan in Ireland and Nudd/Lludd in Wales, among others.

Neachtan

2728.
Sterckx (Claude): Nûtons, Lûtons et dieux celtes.
In ZCP 46 (1994), pp. 39–79.
Delineates the basic attributes of a Celtic water deity surfacing as Nuadha/Luadha or Neachtan in Ireland and Nudd/Lludd in Wales, among others.

neamhní

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

neb-

3794.
Hamp (Eric P.): Does morphological reconstruction really exist?
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 65–87.
Exposes the set of rules that govern Proto-Indo-European derivational patterns involving the prefix *h1su and the adjectival *-i, which is illustrated especially by examples of the several compounding types occurring with OIr. so-. In addition argues that the Old Irish negative prefix neb-/neph- derives from the petrified result of the prefix concatenation *ne-su- before a vowel.

Nechtan

4573.
Sergent (Bernard): Elcmar, Nechtan, Óengus: qui est qui?
In Ollodagos 14/2 (2000), pp. 179–276.
ad C. Sterckx, Dieux d’eau: Apollons celtes et gaulois, Bruxelles 1996. Argues that Lug and Óengus are respectively the only apollinean divinity and the only hermaic divinity in the Celtic pantheon, while Nechtan (who can also be named Manannán and Núada) is the water-god and primordial king with healing attributes.
6952.
Puhvel (Jaan): Aquam exstinguere.
In JIES 1/3 (Fall 1973), pp. 378–386.
ad G. Dumézil, ‘Le puits de Nechtan’, in Celtica 6 (1963), pp. 50–61.
6954.
Littleton (C. Scott): Poseidon as a reflex of the Indo-European ‘source of waters’ god.
In JIES 1/4 (Winter 1973), p. 423.
12045.
Ford (Patrick K.): The Well of Nechtan and ‘La gloire lumineuse’.
In Myth in Indo-European antiquity (1974), pp. 67–74.
12029.
Sayers (William): The Old Irish Bóand/Nechtan myth in the light of Scandinavian evidence.
In ScanCan 1 (1983), pp. 63–78.
ad G. Dumézil, Mythe et épopée III (1973), pp. 21-89; examines the aquatic and equine motifs occurring in the dindshenchas of Bóand, and discusses their relation to the Celtic and Scandinavian mythical figure of the water-horse.

nefroihi (Og)

2495.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): The five languages of Wales in the pre-Norman inscriptions.
In CMCS 44 (Winter 2002), pp. 1–36.
Discusses Irish names in both Ogam and Roman script: maccvdecceti (cf. OIr. Macc Deichet); camvloris; fannvci; nefroihi (cf. OIr. Nad-Froích); filius carotinn (cf. OIr. Macc Cáerthainn).

Neimhead

7767.
Boyle (Paddy): A townland called Nevitt.
In AI 19/2 (Summer 2005), pp. 26–30.

néit

1420.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: VI. On the origin of the Celto-Germanic etymon *nent-.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 183–184.
ad. E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 27 (1976) p. 1-20 [8. nantu-, nanti-]. *nent- ‘be bold, aggressive’, as in OIr. néit ‘combat, battle’, reflects an Indo-European verbal theme.
Hamp (E. P.) (ref.)

nem

2818.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): The Christianization of the early Irish cosmos?: muir mas, nem nglas, talam cé (Blath. 258).
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 532–547.
Provides a semantic study of the terms used in Irish to describe the perceived organization of the universe, focusing on the transition from the pagan Celtic three-fold cosmic conception of earth, sea and sky to the Christian dichotomy of heaven and earth. Discusses in particular material from the Blathmac poems (cf. BILL 5593).
14200.
Felder (Egon): Nemavia, a Celtic temenos.
In Topothesia [Fs. T. S. Ó Máille] (1982), pp. 90–101.
Relates to PC *nemos (> OIr. nem).

nem nglas

2818.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): The Christianization of the early Irish cosmos?: muir mas, nem nglas, talam cé (Blath. 258).
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 532–547.
Provides a semantic study of the terms used in Irish to describe the perceived organization of the universe, focusing on the transition from the pagan Celtic three-fold cosmic conception of earth, sea and sky to the Christian dichotomy of heaven and earth. Discusses in particular material from the Blathmac poems (cf. BILL 5593).

nemain

1512.
Ó Broin (Tomás): Craebruad: the spurious tradition.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh 1973), pp. 103–113.
Craebruad does not describe a building but more likely to describe a sacred grove. Curaid na Craebruaide represents the only legitimate employment of the term craebruad. Suggests that Emain Macha may mean ‘grove of Macha’, and that emain may derive from nemain, possibly related to Irish nemed and Gaul nemeton.

Nemain

17062.
Guyonvarc’h (Christian-J.), Le Roux (Françoise): Mórrígan, Bodb, Macha: la souveraineté guerrière de l’Irlande.
Ogam-Celticum, 25. Rennes: Ogam – Celticum, 1983. 211 pp.
Annexes: III. Notices étymologiques: 1. Mórrígan, Mórrígu; 2. Bodb, Badb, gaul. Cathubodua; 3. Nemain; 4. Irl. Nét, celt. cont. Neto, gaul. Nantosuelta; 5. Tethra; 6. Cruinn, Cruinniuc, Crunnchu; 7. Macha; 8. Bran, fiach, fennóg; 9. Ces Ulad et Noínden Ulad.

nemed

1512.
Ó Broin (Tomás): Craebruad: the spurious tradition.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh 1973), pp. 103–113.
Craebruad does not describe a building but more likely to describe a sacred grove. Curaid na Craebruaide represents the only legitimate employment of the term craebruad. Suggests that Emain Macha may mean ‘grove of Macha’, and that emain may derive from nemain, possibly related to Irish nemed and Gaul nemeton.
4710.
Aitchison (N. B.): Kingship, society, and sacrality: rank, power, and ideology in early medieval Ireland.
In Traditio 49 (1994), pp. 45–75.
7655.
Haderlein (Konrad): Celtic roots: vernacular terminology and pagan ritual in Carlomann’s Draft Capitulary of A.D. 743, Codex Vat. Pal. Lat. 577.
In CJIS/RCÉI 18/2 (1992), pp. 1–29.
Analyses problematic readings in the Indiculus superstitionum et paganiorum, particularly dadsisas (leg. *dæsil) and nimidas which are compared with OIr. dessel and nemed respectively.
7767.
Boyle (Paddy): A townland called Nevitt.
In AI 19/2 (Summer 2005), pp. 26–30.
10922.
Kilpatrick (Kelly A.): A case study of nemeton place-names.
In Ollodagos 25/1 (2010), pp. 3–110.
In Appendix I: [List of] nemeton place-names; Appendix II: List of nemeton-epigraphic inscriptions; Appendix III: Nemed passage from O’Mulconry’s glossary [based on ACL 1.232; with English translation].
11247.
Watkins (Calvert): Language, culture or history?
In Papers from the parasession on language and behavior (1981), pp. 238–248.
Discusses the Celtic background of the OIr. term nemed and the phrase fear an ais óir occurring in Classical Bardic poetry).

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 663-673.
15912.
Breatnach (Liam): On Old Irish collective and abstract nouns, the meaning of cétmuinter, and marriage in early mediaeval Ireland.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 1–29.
I. Discusses the use of words to signify both an abstract concept and a person who embodies it, or both a collective and an individual member of the collective: cerd, dán, díberg, flaith, grád, nemed, ráth, naidm, aitire, cland, eclais, fine, muinter; II. The meaning of cétmuinter [Argues it meant ‘spouse’ and could be applied to both husband and wife].

Nemed

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

nemed (in place names)

13455.
Taylor (Simon): Pictish place-names revisited.
In Pictish progress (2011), pp. 67–118.
Examines the distribution of place-names in northern Britain which contain elements defined as P-Celtic. Appendix 1: Survey of place-name elements organized according to their degree of Pictishness (Category 1: P-Celtic words probably not borrowed into Gaelic: *aber or *abbor, *bren or *brun, *cēt, *cuper, *dol, *eclēs, *lanerc, *mig, *ogel, *pant, *pen, *pert, *pevr, *pren, ?*roth, *traus/*tros, Note on *nemed; Category 2: P-Celtic words borrowed into Gaelic but only attested in place-names: *cair, *carden, *gronn; Category 3: P-Celtic loan-words attested as common nouns in Gaelic: bad, dail, monadh, pett, pòr, preas; Category 4: Gaelic elements influenced by a Pictish cognate: ? beinn, blàr, càrn, dabhach, dùn, foithir, lios, ràth, srath); Appendix 2: The problem of Cardean; Appendix 3: A note on Keir; Appendix 4: Certain, probable or possible ‘Pictish’ names containing elements not discussed above.

nemetarscarthach

9430.
McLeod (Neil): Property and honour price in the Brehon law glosses and commentaries.
In IJ 31 (1996), pp. 280–295.
On the meaning of the legal terms tochus etarscarthach and tochus nemetarscarthach.

nemeton (Gaul)

1512.
Ó Broin (Tomás): Craebruad: the spurious tradition.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh 1973), pp. 103–113.
Craebruad does not describe a building but more likely to describe a sacred grove. Curaid na Craebruaide represents the only legitimate employment of the term craebruad. Suggests that Emain Macha may mean ‘grove of Macha’, and that emain may derive from nemain, possibly related to Irish nemed and Gaul nemeton.

nemnall

16729.
Pyysalo (Jouna): Ten new etymologies between Old Gaulish and the Indo-European languages.
In SCF 13 (2016), pp. 47–68.
1. OGaul. asia- ‘secale’: Lith. asỹ- ‘Schachtel-, Schafthalm’; 2. OGaul. nemnali- ‘célébrer’: RV. námna- ‘sich beugen/neigen’ [OIr. nemnall]; 3. OGaul. mapalia- ‘kindlich’: TochA. mkälto- ‘jung, klein’ [OIr. macc]; 4. OGaul. mas ‘gl. metallum’: TochA. msāṣ ‘imo : from beneath’; 5. OGaul. cunobarro- (PN.) ‘Tête-de-Chien’ : CLu. paraia- ‘hoch’ [OIr. barr]; 6. OGaul. marco- ‘horse’: TochA. markä- ‘move’ [OIr. marc]; 7. OGaul. slēbino- ‘montanus’: TochB. ṣale ‘mountain, hill’ [OIr. slíab]; 8. OGaul. cobro- ‘love, desire, greed’: TochB. kakāpo- ‘desire, crave, want’ [OIr. -chobur, (ad-)cobra, etc.]; 9. OGaul. mallo- ‘langsam, träge’: TochB. mālle ‘dull’ [OIr. mall]; 10. OGaul. bilio- ‘Baum’: TochB. pilta- ‘leaf, petal’ [OIr. bile].

nemthenchus

4710.
Aitchison (N. B.): Kingship, society, and sacrality: rank, power, and ideology in early medieval Ireland.
In Traditio 49 (1994), pp. 45–75.

nemthenga

18430.
Sayers (William): Bricriu nemthenga (‘poison-tongue’): onomastics and social function in early Irish literature.
In Mediaevistik 30 (2017), pp. 87–102.

Nemthenn

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.

*nent-

1420.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: VI. On the origin of the Celto-Germanic etymon *nent-.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 183–184.
ad. E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 27 (1976) p. 1-20 [8. nantu-, nanti-]. *nent- ‘be bold, aggressive’, as in OIr. néit ‘combat, battle’, reflects an Indo-European verbal theme.
Hamp (E. P.) (ref.)

neo

11665.
Breatnach (Liam): Dinnseanchas Inbhear Chíochmhaine, ‘trí comaccomail na Góedelge’, agus caibidil i stair litriú na Gaeilge.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 37–55.
Studies the use of pseudo-archaic spelling in texts found in a handful of sixteenth-century Irish manuscripts (particularly TCD H 3. 18, Harley 5280 and RIA 23 N 10).

neph-

3794.
Hamp (Eric P.): Does morphological reconstruction really exist?
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 65–87.
Exposes the set of rules that govern Proto-Indo-European derivational patterns involving the prefix *h1su and the adjectival *-i, which is illustrated especially by examples of the several compounding types occurring with OIr. so-. In addition argues that the Old Irish negative prefix neb-/neph- derives from the petrified result of the prefix concatenation *ne-su- before a vowel.

nephis

3794.
Hamp (Eric P.): Does morphological reconstruction really exist?
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 65–87.
Exposes the set of rules that govern Proto-Indo-European derivational patterns involving the prefix *h1su and the adjectival *-i, which is illustrated especially by examples of the several compounding types occurring with OIr. so-. In addition argues that the Old Irish negative prefix neb-/neph- derives from the petrified result of the prefix concatenation *ne-su- before a vowel.

nert

1236.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: III. 1. On non-compounding with negatives.
In Ériu 44 (1993), p. 177.
On privative of nert, énirt < *é(n)nertˊ with vocalism of simplex; contrast sonairt ‘strong’ (cf. E. P. Hamp, in ÉtC 29 (1992) pp. 215-217).
Hamp (E. P.) (ref.)

Nesus

2264.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): Some bogus Irish saints.
In Ainm 3 (1988), pp. 1–8.
Anesus (Nesus), Bríg, Ciar, Conchliath, Damán, Feilic, Feimme, Medrán, Meic Mochoba, Modiúit (Modút), Ródán, Sénán, Sillán, T’eolas.

Nét

17062.
Guyonvarc’h (Christian-J.), Le Roux (Françoise): Mórrígan, Bodb, Macha: la souveraineté guerrière de l’Irlande.
Ogam-Celticum, 25. Rennes: Ogam – Celticum, 1983. 211 pp.
Annexes: III. Notices étymologiques: 1. Mórrígan, Mórrígu; 2. Bodb, Badb, gaul. Cathubodua; 3. Nemain; 4. Irl. Nét, celt. cont. Neto, gaul. Nantosuelta; 5. Tethra; 6. Cruinn, Cruinniuc, Crunnchu; 7. Macha; 8. Bran, fiach, fennóg; 9. Ces Ulad et Noínden Ulad.

Nevitt

7767.
Boyle (Paddy): A townland called Nevitt.
In AI 19/2 (Summer 2005), pp. 26–30.

482.
Hamp (Eric P.): Two etymologies.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 173–177.
1. áu ‘away’ [On adverbs deriving from (conjugated) prepositions]; 2. `(any)thing’.
1577.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): Nótaí ar Ghaeilge an tuaiscirt I.
In Éigse 16/4 (Geimhreadh 1976), pp. 285–316.
On the use of and cha in Uster Irish.
1578.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Cha and in the Irish of Ulster.
In Éigse 16/4 (Geimhreadh 1976), pp. 317–336.
Incl. sections on [1.] Areal distribution of the forms and cha; [2.] Transitional zone; [3.] Emphatic use of cha; [4.] Vowel quantity in cha; [5.] Diferential use of cha and ; [6.] Origin and spread of cha.
690.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): and cha in Ulster Irish.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 92–141.
1. Scottish Gaelic influence [on Ulster Ir.]; 2. O’Rahilly’s theory [cf. Best2 527]; 3. Present for future in Ulster Irish; 4. Present for future in Early Irish; 5. A reconstruction of the data; 6. An alternative interpretation [cha associated with ‘informal’ style in Ulster].
3173.
Kortlandt (Frederik): Three notes on the Old Irish verb: 2. níta, ‘am not, is not’.
In ÉtC 34 (1998–2000), pp. 144–145.
7458.
Wagner (Heinrich): Iarfhocal ar agus cha sa Ghaeilge.
In Fs. de Bhaldraithe (1986), pp. 1–10.
11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.
2198.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Zu den Irischen Negationen.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 111–120.
1. ; 2. nícon; 3. Imperativ und Antwort [na, , nad]; 4. Die Nebensatznegationen: nad, nach; 5. Etymologien; 6. ocus na(ch)/ocus nad; 7. Negative Fragesatze; 8. na statt nad, nach; 9. na ''; 10. na statt ina, arna, usw.

nı̄

1181.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Discourse markers in medieval Irish texts: cs̄, cair, nı̄, and similar features.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 1–37.
1. Functional identity of cs̄, ces, cesc, and cair; 2. Origin of cair and ces; 3. ce(a)sc; 4. ní insae, ní ansae, ní hannsa; n’insae; 5. Translation, lento style, stylistic variation; 6. ce(a)st, ceist; 7. Conclusions. Incl. index of texts referred to.

ní ‘anything, something’

1009.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish na nní: a case of quid pro quo?
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 168–181.
vs. P. Schrijver's view (in Studies in the History of Celtic Pronouns and Particles, Maynooth 1997) of the alleged neuter i-stem forms (PC *sim > InsC *sin) of the demonstrative *so(-). Also discusses the relevance of the paradigm and derivation of ‘anything, something’ and na ‘any’.
Schrijver (P.) (ref.)

ní as

1996.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative in Eastern Gaelic.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 1–6.
The particles used in the formation of the periphrastic comparative in all varieties of E Gaelic derive from a common source: pres. nas < OIr. a n-as; past/cond. na ba < < OIr. a mba.

ní as/is

1896.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 1–8.

ní ba

1996.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative in Eastern Gaelic.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 1–6.
The particles used in the formation of the periphrastic comparative in all varieties of E Gaelic derive from a common source: pres. nas < OIr. a n-as; past/cond. na ba < < OIr. a mba.

Ní Bhriain, Eisibéal (†1788)

1989.
Breatnach (Pádraig A.): Togha na héigse 1700–1800: 3. A bhuime den bhród mhórdha ba rathamhail réim (Úna Nic Cruitín).
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 135–137.
Poem dedicated to Eisibéal Ní Bhriain (†1788), by Úna Nic Cruitín; beg. A bhuime den bhród mhórdha ba rathamhail réim. Restored from Maynooth C 15, with metrical analysis, MS readings and notes.

ní for

17447.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: III. 1. On the preposition for with the negative particle in Old Irish.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 227–232.
Argues for a negative construction ní for ‘neither, also … not, in addition … not’.

ní (indef. pron.)

2123.
Corthals (Johan): Zur Funktion der frühirischen Prosasagen.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 67–81.
With discussion of the narrative formulae co n-accae (ní) and co cualae (ní).

ní íosfainn seachtain é

1711.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ní íosfainn seachtain é.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 371–378.
[1.] On the use of indefinite nouns with time reference as adverbs meaning ‘over a period of …', e.g. seachtain, , bliain, , coicís in negative contexts in the Irish of An Cheathrú Rua; [2.] i leith an bóthar: on the adverbial use of the nominative of definite nouns following certain compound and nominal prepositions preceded by verbs of motion, e.g. ar aghaidh, i ngiorracht, i leith, timpeall, treasna; [3.] Tá sé ag dul Gaillimh: on the ‘elision’ of the preposition go before place-names.

ní sa

1896.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 1–8.

ni’s (ghost word) (ScG)

1996.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative in Eastern Gaelic.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 1–6.
The particles used in the formation of the periphrastic comparative in all varieties of E Gaelic derive from a common source: pres. nas < OIr. a n-as; past/cond. na ba < < OIr. a mba.

nia

2470.
Carey (John): Two notes on names.
In Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 116–124.
1. Crimthann Nia Náir; 2. Derc Corra.
3206.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [1.] Nei, keifn, and kefynderw.
In BBCS 25/4 (May 1974), pp. 386–388.
Further to BBCS 24/2 (1971), pp. 105–122 [On the meaning of PC *neūs (> OIr. niae)].
3233.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The sister’s son in early Irish literature.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 128–160.
On the significance of the maternal kindred in early Irish literature, as exemplified by Christ’s relationship with the Jews, Bres’s with the Túatha Dé Danann and Cú Chulainn’s with Conchobar.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 65-94.

Nia Segamon

17991.
Weiss (Michael): An Italo-Celtic divinity and a common Sabellic sound change.
In ClAnt 36/2 (Oct. 2017), pp. 370–389.
Argues Lat. theonym Sēmō is connected to a Proto-Celtic *Segomū (> Gaul. Segomoni, Og. segamanas, OIr. (Nia) Segamon), positing a Proto-Italo-Celtic *seĝhomōn- ‘strong one,' ‘strongman’ (< PIE * √seĝh- ‘hold firmly,' etc.).

niad

2686.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III. Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 4. Personal (conjugated) copula forms.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 158–159.
niad, nid.

Niall Frossach

2569.
Wiley (Dan M.): Niall Frossach’s true judgement.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 19–36.
Argues that reddening (imdergad) and eruption of steam () are connected with an Irish hagiographical motif, and that their attribution to Niall is politically motivated.
7671.
Greene (David): The ‘act of truth’ in a Middle Irish story.
In Saga och Sed (1976), pp. 30–37.
English translation from LL 35670-35710.

Nibheis

4288.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: [2.] Nevis.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 150–151.
Suggests a reconstruction *nemes-to- ‘heavenly’ for Neimheas.

Nic Carthaigh, Máire (†1720)

2016.
Breatnach (Pádraig A.): Togha na héigse 1700–1800: 4. Mairg do chuala marbh a tuairisc (Uilliam Mac Cartáin).
In Éigse 31 (1999), pp. 103–120.
Elegy on the death of Máire Nic Carthaigh (†1720) by Uilliam Mac Cartáin, beg. Mairg do chuala marbh a tuairisc; ed. from RIA MSS 23 D 19, 24 M 33 and 23 N 14; King’s Inns MS 6; Torna 85; NLI G 374; Maynooth M 4; and Wisconsin 180. Normalised text with metrical analysis, critical apparatus and textual notes.

níco

3013.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 4. Das negative altir. Präverb nícon ‘non’.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 18–35.
Identifies its original syntactical usage and argues (with R. Thurneysen, GOI §861, vs. D. Greene, in Ériu 21 (1969), pp. 90-92) that it contains the consecutive conjunction co.

nícon

3013.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 4. Das negative altir. Präverb nícon ‘non’.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 18–35.
Identifies its original syntactical usage and argues (with R. Thurneysen, GOI §861, vs. D. Greene, in Ériu 21 (1969), pp. 90-92) that it contains the consecutive conjunction co.
2198.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Zu den Irischen Negationen.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 111–120.
1. ; 2. nícon; 3. Imperativ und Antwort [na, , nad]; 4. Die Nebensatznegationen: nad, nach; 5. Etymologien; 6. ocus na(ch)/ocus nad; 7. Negative Fragesatze; 8. na statt nad, nach; 9. na ''; 10. na statt ina, arna, usw.
15135.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): A further note on the Old Irish negative particle nícon.

nícon-

2912.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): La particule v. irl. nícon-.
In ÉtC 15 (1976–1978), pp. 505–522.
Studies the tenses and modes used with nícon-, with a dicussion of its relationship to perfective com-.

nícon ro

9451.
Hughes (A. J.): Ulster Irish char as a reflex of Old Irish nícon ro rather than a Scottish Import.
In Miscellanea Wagner (1997), pp. 225–258.

nid

2686.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III. Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 4. Personal (conjugated) copula forms.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 158–159.
niad, nid.

nihelas

12919.
Poppe (Erich): Latinate terminology in Auraicept na n-éces.
In History of linguistics 1996 (1999), pp. 191–201.

ním th’[ḟ]ír-ainm

535.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Varia: IV. A crux in Táin bó Fraích.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 235–241.
Discusses the grammar, idiom and contents of the dialogue in TBF lines 361-362 (as ed. by W. Meid 1967 [BILL 4991]).

Nimheis

4288.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: [2.] Nevis.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 150–151.
Suggests a reconstruction *nemes-to- ‘heavenly’ for Neimheas.

Nin

1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.

ní-n-aurdallat anai

724.
Watkins (Calvert): Is tre ḟír flathemon: marginalia to Audacht Morainn.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 181–198.
Discusses other PIE parallels of ‘Act of Truth’ and cognate verbal expressions of the following four expressions: 1. Is tre ḟír flathemon ‘it is through the ruler’s truth’; 2. mortlithi (mórslóg no) márlóchet di doínib dingbatar ‘plagues, (a great host, or) great lightnings are warded off men’; 3. gáu ḟlathemon ‘ruler’s falsehood’; 4. [n]-aurdallat dána (support for emendation to ní-n-aurdallat anai ‘let not riches blind him’ (see F. Kelly, AM §31); 5. to- aidble éisc i sruthaib -snáither (emends to to- aidbli éisc i sruthaib -snáither ‘with abundance of fish it is swum in streams’, taking to-snáither to be an impersonal passive rather than 2nd sg. deponent (see F. Kelly, AM §20).

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 626-643.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)

ní[n]-aurdallat dána

724.
Watkins (Calvert): Is tre ḟír flathemon: marginalia to Audacht Morainn.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 181–198.
Discusses other PIE parallels of ‘Act of Truth’ and cognate verbal expressions of the following four expressions: 1. Is tre ḟír flathemon ‘it is through the ruler’s truth’; 2. mortlithi (mórslóg no) márlóchet di doínib dingbatar ‘plagues, (a great host, or) great lightnings are warded off men’; 3. gáu ḟlathemon ‘ruler’s falsehood’; 4. [n]-aurdallat dána (support for emendation to ní-n-aurdallat anai ‘let not riches blind him’ (see F. Kelly, AM §31); 5. to- aidble éisc i sruthaib -snáither (emends to to- aidbli éisc i sruthaib -snáither ‘with abundance of fish it is swum in streams’, taking to-snáither to be an impersonal passive rather than 2nd sg. deponent (see F. Kelly, AM §20).

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 626-643.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)

ninsceachán

436.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 1–10.
1. bleachtaire, miolcaire; 2. bráca; 3. burdún; 4. cailpís; 5. cáipéis/cáipís; 6. daorach; 7. malach; 8. ninsceachán, ninsci, ninscim, etc.; 9. painéad; 10. pasálann; 11. pasúr; 12. slincín; 13. splincéara; 14. sprioc; 15. trantal.

ninsci

436.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 1–10.
1. bleachtaire, miolcaire; 2. bráca; 3. burdún; 4. cailpís; 5. cáipéis/cáipís; 6. daorach; 7. malach; 8. ninsceachán, ninsci, ninscim, etc.; 9. painéad; 10. pasálann; 11. pasúr; 12. slincín; 13. splincéara; 14. sprioc; 15. trantal.

ninscim

436.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 1–10.
1. bleachtaire, miolcaire; 2. bráca; 3. burdún; 4. cailpís; 5. cáipéis/cáipís; 6. daorach; 7. malach; 8. ninsceachán, ninsci, ninscim, etc.; 9. painéad; 10. pasálann; 11. pasúr; 12. slincín; 13. splincéara; 14. sprioc; 15. trantal.

níos

1779.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Northern Irish níos/nios/nas.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 333–340.
1896.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 1–8.
1996.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative in Eastern Gaelic.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 1–6.
The particles used in the formation of the periphrastic comparative in all varieties of E Gaelic derive from a common source: pres. nas < OIr. a n-as; past/cond. na ba < < OIr. a mba.

nios (Ul)

1779.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Northern Irish níos/nios/nas.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 333–340.

níosa

1896.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 1–8.

ní-s tairchet

801.
Byrne (Francis John): Varia: III. 1. *do-airet.
In Ériu 33 (1982), p. 167.
Ní-s tairchet ‘he cannot conduct them’ (CGH 93).

ní[t] tairissi limm

535.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Varia: IV. A crux in Táin bó Fraích.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 235–241.
Discusses the grammar, idiom and contents of the dialogue in TBF lines 361-362 (as ed. by W. Meid 1967 [BILL 4991]).

níta

3173.
Kortlandt (Frederik): Three notes on the Old Irish verb: 2. níta, ‘am not, is not’.
In ÉtC 34 (1998–2000), pp. 144–145.

Níth

15324.
Gosling (Paul): Placing names in Táin bó Cúailnge: the river ‘Níth’ and the ford `Áth Carpat’.
In JCLAHS 27/3 (2011), pp. 366–378.
Identified with Castletown river and the ford at Toberona, respectively.
17998.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: III. 1. 2. The river Níth.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 232–237.
Provides further evidence for its identification as Castletown River.

nithinn

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

nitrum (Lat.)

853.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): Varia: V. Old Irish sléic.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 185–186.
ad D. Greene, in Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163-164. Suggests a correspondence with Lat. nitrum and that sléic meant potash, as a personal detergent, and perhaps also a coloured, friable salt used as a cosmetic.
Greene (D.) (ref.)

niúide neáide

403.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Some Modern Irish loanwords describing people.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 53–56.
bambairne; cníopaire; grabaire; guilpín; (p)leota; niúide neáide; raicleach; ráilliúnach; ránaí; reanglach.

niúin (neoin)

413.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Deamhan (?) agus deireadh an lae.
In Celtica 18 (1986), p. 192.
Read diún (as in MS) < *i ndiúin < *i niúin = *i neoin for deamhan in phrase `go raibh deamhan agus deireadh an lae ag teacht', in Éamon a Búrc: Scéalta, ed. by P. Ó Ceannabháin (1983), pp. 48, 70.
Ó Ceannabháin (Peadar) (ref.)

*nk

1224.
Schrijver (Peter): On the development of vowels before tautosyllabic nasals in Primitive Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33–52.
1. Introduction; 2. Rise of nasalized allophones of short vowels; 3. The development of *nt, *nk into PrimIr. unlenited *d, *g; 4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’; 5. Loss of a nasal before a voicless fricative; 6. OIr. téit, -tét; 7. The relation of *nt, *nk > *d, *g to the rounding of vowels by a preceding labiovelar; 8. Summary; App.: The development of PrimIr. *and, *amb, *ang.

-nn (slender) > [ŋˊ]

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.

1741.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Ainmfhocail i ndíchomhréir.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 119–121.
barr, caoi, faitíos, feadh, grá, leisce, nós, scáth.
2898.
Bader (Françoise): Vieil irlandais , no- et les formes tokhariennes apparentées.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 391–403.

no

3014.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 5. Das altirische Verbalpräfix nu/no.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 35–59.
Criticises the doctrine that links Old Irish preverbs no-, to/do- with the Hittite ‘sentence connectives’ and proposes alternative etymologies based on their Basque and Amazigh typological parallels, among others.
9583.
Kelly (Patricia): Remarks on the omission of the particle no in early Irish verbs.
In Studia celtica et indogermanica [Fs. Meid] (1999), pp. 157–161.
12544.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Old Irish no·.

no-

2898.
Bader (Françoise): Vieil irlandais , no- et les formes tokhariennes apparentées.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 391–403.

No etlod tri ormath

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

nocha

690.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): and cha in Ulster Irish.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 92–141.
1. Scottish Gaelic influence [on Ulster Ir.]; 2. O’Rahilly’s theory [cf. Best2 527]; 3. Present for future in Ulster Irish; 4. Present for future in Early Irish; 5. A reconstruction of the data; 6. An alternative interpretation [cha associated with ‘informal’ style in Ulster].

nocho

690.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): and cha in Ulster Irish.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 92–141.
1. Scottish Gaelic influence [on Ulster Ir.]; 2. O’Rahilly’s theory [cf. Best2 527]; 3. Present for future in Ulster Irish; 4. Present for future in Early Irish; 5. A reconstruction of the data; 6. An alternative interpretation [cha associated with ‘informal’ style in Ulster].
3013.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 4. Das negative altir. Präverb nícon ‘non’.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 18–35.
Identifies its original syntactical usage and argues (with R. Thurneysen, GOI §861, vs. D. Greene, in Ériu 21 (1969), pp. 90-92) that it contains the consecutive conjunction co.

Nodons

2636.
Carey (John): Nodons in Britain and Ireland.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 1–22.
Discusses evidence of Núadu in Irish genealogy and literature.

noe

14954.
Pyysalo (Jouna): Ten new Indo-European etymologies for the Celtic languages.
In SCF 12 (2015), pp. 62–79.
1. OIr. oenach- ‘an injury/wound’: OSax. ēndago- ‘day of death’: Hitt. ḫingan- ‘Seuche, Pest, Todesfall’; 2. OIr. airecht- ‘assembly, meeting, conversation’: LAv. vyāxa- ‘Versammlung’; 3. OIr. cumachtae- ‘pouvoir, puissance’: TochB. ekaññe ‘possession, equipment’, AV aṣṭi- ‘Erreichung’; 4. OIr. ás- ‘croissance, fait de grandir/grossir’: Maced. ἄξο- ‘ὑλή'; 5. OBret. iolent ‘precentur’: Lat. hariolā- ‘wahrsagen’; 6. MidIr. cīch- (f.) ‘weibliche Brust’: RV. kı̄́kasā- ‘Brust·bein’; 7. OIr. nái- ‘human being, person’: TochA. napen- ‘Mensch’; 8. OIr. tol- ‘Wille’: RV. turá- ‘Willfährig’; 9. OIr. nūadat- ‘hand, wrist or arm’: RV. nodhā- ‘Elefant’; 10. OIr. aiged ‘visage’: OHG agsiunî- ‘species: Aussehen, Angesicht’.

noí

10769.
Blažek (Václav): Indo-European “nine” .
In HS 112 (1999), pp. 188–203.
Includes reconstruction of Celtic forms (esp. OIr. noí, nómad, etc.).

noi decem

4143.
Bisagni (Jacopo), Warntjes (Immo): Latin and Old Irish in the Munich Computus: a reassessment and further evidence.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 1–33.
Offers an analysis of all the instances of code-switching in MS München, Clm 14456.

nóin

14414.
Ó Riain (Gordon): Táinig an tráth nóna: old age in Classical Irish religious verse.
In Aon don éigse (2015), pp. 155–191.
Examines the theme of old age in Classical Irish religious poetry and discusses the motif of nóin in this context.

noínden

1528.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Cess Naíden.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), p. 252.
naíden < noínden and the occasional development nd > d in Middle Irish, e.g. (Slíab) Monduirn > (Slíab) Moduirn, Illandon > Illadon, tindnacol > tidnacol.
4696.
Slotkin (Edgar M.): Noínden: its semantic range.
17062.
Guyonvarc’h (Christian-J.), Le Roux (Françoise): Mórrígan, Bodb, Macha: la souveraineté guerrière de l’Irlande.
Ogam-Celticum, 25. Rennes: Ogam – Celticum, 1983. 211 pp.
Annexes: III. Notices étymologiques: 1. Mórrígan, Mórrígu; 2. Bodb, Badb, gaul. Cathubodua; 3. Nemain; 4. Irl. Nét, celt. cont. Neto, gaul. Nantosuelta; 5. Tethra; 6. Cruinn, Cruinniuc, Crunnchu; 7. Macha; 8. Bran, fiach, fennóg; 9. Ces Ulad et Noínden Ulad.

nómad

10769.
Blažek (Václav): Indo-European “nine” .
In HS 112 (1999), pp. 188–203.
Includes reconstruction of Celtic forms (esp. OIr. noí, nómad, etc.).
11991.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: III. The meaning of nómad.
In Ériu 62 (2012), pp. 197–205.
ad DIL N-63.10, s. v. 2 nómad; explains the origin of the mistranslations on which the erroneous meanings ‘three days’ and ‘four-and-a-half days’ given in this entry are based.

*nónach

4143.
Bisagni (Jacopo), Warntjes (Immo): Latin and Old Irish in the Munich Computus: a reassessment and further evidence.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 1–33.
Offers an analysis of all the instances of code-switching in MS München, Clm 14456.

Nordmainn

5042.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Nationality names in the Irish annals.
In Nomina 16 (1992–1993), pp. 49–70.
Discusses the terms Ériu, Féni, Scotti, Goídil, Cruthin, Picti, Albu, Bretain, Angli, Saxain, Frainc, Geinti, Gaill, Gall-Ghaedhil, Nordmainn, Lochlainn, Danair.

Nortmainn

13938.
Etchingham (Colmán): Names for the Vikings in Irish annals.
In Celtic-Norse relationships (2014), pp. 23–38.
Genti, Gaill, Nordmanni, Nortmainn, Laithlinn, Gaill-Goídil, Dubgaill/Dubgenti, Finngaill/Finngenti.

Noss Head

13605.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland: Ptolemy’s Verubium promontorium, Bede’s Urbs Giudi, Mendick, Minto, and Panlathy.
In ScotL 23 (2004), pp. 57–67.
1. Ptolemy’s Verubium promontorium or Noss Head, Caithness; 2. Bede’s Urbs Giudi; 3. Mendick, Lothian; 4. Minto, near Hawick; 5. Panlathy, near Carnoustie, Angus.
13794.
Breeze (Andrew): Scottish place-names: the way ahead.
In Doonsin’ emerauds (2004), pp. 18–23.
Discusses the following Scottish place-names: 1. Noss Head, Piltanton Burn, Bennachie, and Dunscanby Head; 2. Arran, Cumnock, Girvan, and Irvine; 3. Loquhariot; 4. Pennango and Soutra.

nothath

854.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Varia: VI. 1. Old Irish nothath.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 187–188.
nothat ‘act of making a loan, borrowing’ (Sg. 6a9, 56b3).

n-stem nouns

1215.
Stüber (Karin): The inflection of masculine and feminine n-stems in Irish.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 229–237.

n-stems (Celtic)

1980.
Stüber (Karin): The historical morphology of n-stems in Celtic.
MSCL, 3. Maynooth: Department of Old Irish, Saint Patrick’s College, 1998. 237 pp.
Rev. by
Joseph F. Eska, in Kratylos 46 (2001), pp. 181-185.

*nt

1224.
Schrijver (Peter): On the development of vowels before tautosyllabic nasals in Primitive Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33–52.
1. Introduction; 2. Rise of nasalized allophones of short vowels; 3. The development of *nt, *nk into PrimIr. unlenited *d, *g; 4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’; 5. Loss of a nasal before a voicless fricative; 6. OIr. téit, -tét; 7. The relation of *nt, *nk > *d, *g to the rounding of vowels by a preceding labiovelar; 8. Summary; App.: The development of PrimIr. *and, *amb, *ang.

nu

3014.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 5. Das altirische Verbalpräfix nu/no.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 35–59.
Criticises the doctrine that links Old Irish preverbs no-, to/do- with the Hittite ‘sentence connectives’ and proposes alternative etymologies based on their Basque and Amazigh typological parallels, among others.

Nuachongbháil

5540.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Odhbha and Navan.
In RíM 8/4 (1992–1993), pp. 112–123.
Argues that Navan and An Uaimh are derivations of the earlier historic name Odhbha.

Núada

899.
Sayers (William): Mani maidi an nem …: ringing changes on a cosmic motif.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 99–117.
Discusses the cosmic motif of the three elements (earth, air/sky, water/sea) in early Irish literature. Contains a brief appendix on the deity Núada.

Nuadha Airgeadlámh

2728.
Sterckx (Claude): Nûtons, Lûtons et dieux celtes.
In ZCP 46 (1994), pp. 39–79.
Delineates the basic attributes of a Celtic water deity surfacing as Nuadha/Luadha or Neachtan in Ireland and Nudd/Lludd in Wales, among others.

Núadhu Argatlámh

2728.
Sterckx (Claude): Nûtons, Lûtons et dieux celtes.
In ZCP 46 (1994), pp. 39–79.
Delineates the basic attributes of a Celtic water deity surfacing as Nuadha/Luadha or Neachtan in Ireland and Nudd/Lludd in Wales, among others.

Núadu

2042.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (1–24).
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 183–209.
1756.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (24–120).
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 1–35.
Continued from Éigse 18 (1981), pp. 183-209.

Nuadu

2655.
Wagner (Heinrich): Zur Etymologie von keltisch Nodons, Ir. Nuadu, Kymr. Nudd/Lludd.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 180–187.
Argues that Celt. *Neudont- is equivalent to Gmc. theonymic element (-)nauta- ‘fisher’ (literally ‘catcher’), cf. OSax. (Sax)nōt.
2636.
Carey (John): Nodons in Britain and Ireland.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 1–22.
Discusses evidence of Núadu in Irish genealogy and literature.

Nuadu Argatlám

2636.
Carey (John): Nodons in Britain and Ireland.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 1–22.
Discusses evidence of Núadu in Irish genealogy and literature.

Nugent (family name)

18752.
Oates (Gerry): Three County Armagh family names: MacAvinchey, Mackle and Nugent.
In SAM 26/2 (2017), pp. 121–130.

Nugent Grenville, George, Earl Temple and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland

1869.
Mahony (Robert): Muiris Ó Gormáin and the Lords Lieutenant of Ireland.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 25–36.
On the recycling by Muiris Ó Gormáin for later Lords Lieutenant of his 1763 accession poem (with English translation) for Hugh Percy, Earl of Northumberland, as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. First line Is aoibhinn dhuit, a Éire, in MSS Alnwick Castle (England), Northumberland Estates Office, Percy letters and papers, vol. 36, and Egerton 116.

nuidlech

6208.
Falileyev (Alexander): Beyond historical linguistics: a case for multilingualism in early Wales.
In Texts and transmission (2002), pp. 6–13.

Núinnseann (family name)

18752.
Oates (Gerry): Three County Armagh family names: MacAvinchey, Mackle and Nugent.
In SAM 26/2 (2017), pp. 121–130.

nuis

2050.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Two notes.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 285–288.
I. Vowel changes in the inflexion of cos, cas; II. The phrases *cuirim in iúl and *ar aoiniúl.

nundinum (Lat)

900.
Joseph (Lionel S.): A survival from the Italo-Celtic legal vocabulary.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 119–125.
OIr. líthech ‘accused person’ (cf. liïd ‘accuses’) and Lat. lı̄s, lı̄tis ‘lawsuit’; also OIr. ad ‘law’, adae ‘due, fitting, proper’, adas ‘suitable, appropriate to’ and Umbrian arsie ‘sancte’, etc; OIr. coll ‘injury, violation’ and Lat. culpa ‘blame’; cf. *-din- in trédenus ‘three days’ and Lat. nundinum ‘nine days’.

ny s- (Mx)

1996.
Breatnach (R. A.): The periphrastic comparative in Eastern Gaelic.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 1–6.
The particles used in the formation of the periphrastic comparative in all varieties of E Gaelic derive from a common source: pres. nas < OIr. a n-as; past/cond. na ba < < OIr. a mba.