Words and Proper Names

*kanto-bu-s

1132.
McCone (Kim): The inflection of OIr. ‘cow’ and the etymology of buchet.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 37–44.
vs.T. F. O’Rahilly, in Ériu 16 (1952), pp. 7-20. Derives buchet from *bu-kanto-s, inverted from *kanto-bu-s ‘possessing a hundred cows’. Derives bue ‘man of property’, am-bue ‘man without property’ from *bow- ‘cow’ (vs. LEIA B-112).

Kearney (family name)

2175.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): The Carneys of Connacht.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [Fs. Carney] (1989), pp. 342–357.

keeil (Mx)

5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.

keeill (Mx)

2122.
Broderick (George): Sprachkontakt und Sprachgeschichte der Insel Man im Rahmen ihrer Ortsnamen.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 57–65.

Keeill (Mx) (in place names)

13694.
Muhr (Kay): Ulster place-name links between Gaelic, English and Scots, starting with Kill.
In Language links (2001), pp. 257–272.
On the anglicization of place names containing Ir. CilI.

Ker.

624.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 213–216.
Ker. (= ‘Kerry’) as a reference in Dinneen’s dictionaries.
Dinneen (Patrick S.) (ref.)

kern (Ir. ceithearn)

2056.
Harrison (Alan): The Shower of Hell.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 304.
Etym. of Ir. ceithearn.

kernety (Ir. ceithearn an tí)

2056.
Harrison (Alan): The Shower of Hell.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 304.
Etym. of Ir. ceithearn.

keth (MCo.)

480.
Eska (Joseph F.): The deictic pronominal *ḱey in Celtic.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 153–155.
1. Old Irish ; 2. Gaulish duci; 3. Ogham koi and a Gaulish ghost form; 4. Gaulish isoc; 5. Middle Cornish keth.

Kevin, St.

689.
Oskamp (Hans): The Irish quatrains and salutation in the Drummond Missal.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 82–91.
Edition with translation and commentary of three marginal quatrains (beg. Salcaid aenchap anart lín, Timcheallmait relic maic Dé, Niro aisce aisc it bíu resp.) and salutation in which St. Kevin welcomes St. Ciarán Saigre to his cell (beg. Is mochen a noeb-chlerig to which St Ciarán replies beg. A Choemgin a chloch-adbaig). Texts dated to 10th cent., and ed. from New York, Pierpont Morgan MS M 627. Some palaeoghraphic discussion of hands of MS. Contains 6 plates.

Keys (House of)

2500.
Broderick (George): Tynwald: a Manx cult-site and institution of pre-Scandinavian origin?
In CMCS 46 (Winter 2003), pp. 55–94.
Argues that the Manx Tynwald continues a Celtic rather than a Germanic tradition. Appendix contains a contemporary account of the Tynwald Fair Day of 1691.

kiaugh (Sco.)

4427.
Breeze (Andrew): Etymological notes on Kirkcaldy, jocteleg ‘knife’, kiaugh ‘trouble’, striffen ‘membrane’ and cow ‘hobgolin’.
In ScotL 16 (1997), pp. 97–110.
Suggests Scots kiaugh, striffen, are Gaelic loan words (< ciach, srebann).

Kilcaskan

5996.
Mac Cárthaigh (Mícheál): Placenames of the parish of Kilkascan.
In JCHAS 85 (1980), pp. 99–124.
Barony of Bear, Co. Cork.

Kilcorway

2347.
Ó Ceallaigh (Séamus): BUPNS reprints 12: Queries and suggestions.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 167–168.
1. Ard Macha Bréige; 2. Kilcorway; 3. MacArt’s Fort: Ballymacarret.

Repr. from BUPNS 1/3 (Summer, 1953), pp. 54-56; [also repr. as BUPNS 1 (1955), pp. 36-37].

2348.
Mooney (B.): BUPNS reprints 13: Kilcorway and Clanrye.
In Ainm 8 (1998), p. 169.
Repr. from BUPNS1/4 (Autumn 1953), p. 83; [also repr. as BUPNS 1 (1955), p. 38].

Kilkcash

1964.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): Cill Chaise nó Cill Chais? Logainm i gContae Thiobraid Árann.
In Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 89–97.

Kill (in place names)

13694.
Muhr (Kay): Ulster place-name links between Gaelic, English and Scots, starting with Kill.
In Language links (2001), pp. 257–272.
On the anglicization of place names containing Ir. CilI.

Killaconenagh

8708.
Mac Cárthaigh (Mícheál): Placenames of the parish of Killaconenagh.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 124–148.

Killaloe

1471.
Bradley (John): Killaloe: a pre-Norman borough?
In Peritia 8 (1994), pp. 170–179.
Traces the early history of Killaloe (Cell Da Lua) and Kincora (Ceann Coradh).
1721.
O’Sullivan (Anne): Limerick, Killaloe and Kells 1194–1250.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), pp. 451–455.
Extracts of annalistic entries concerning the dioceses of Limerick and Killaloe, and a list of bishoprics set up at the Synod of Kells in 1152. Ed. with Engl transl. from MS TCD H 2.12/9.

Killeshin

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Killinchy

220.
Hughes (A. J.): The virgin St. Duinsech and her three Ulster churches near Strangford Lough, County Down.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 113–124.
Evidence for St Duinsech in east County Down in the placenames Killinchy, Killinchy in the Woods, and Dunsy Island in Strangford Lough.

Kilmacrehy

719.
de Paor (Liam): Saint Mac Creiche of Liscannor.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 93–121.
The mythological figure Mac Creiche: 1. Kilmacrehy; 2. The folklore of Liscannor; 3. The documentary material; 4. Mac Creiche’s age; 5. Mac Creiche as hermit; 6. Mac Creiche and the sea; 7. Mac Creiche’s contests with monsters; 8. Mac Creiche as ‘man of plunder’; 9. Other miracles of Mac Creiche; 10. Mac Creiche’s tribal and family connections; 11. Mac Creiche’s connections with other saints; 12. The historicity of Mac Creiche; 13. Who was Mac Creiche? Includes an appendix on the Cyclops in Ireland by D. Greene (pp. 120-21).
Greene (David) (app. auth.)

Kilmakillogue

9789.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): To Chellóc mac Oíbléni: saint and places.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 258–267.
On the identification of four cult sites associated with Mo Chellóg: Inisvickillane, Ballinrannig, Inis Labrainne (now Inch in the parish of Ballinvoher) and Cell Mo Cheallóg (now Kilmakillogue).

Kilmory (Arran)

4138.
O’Neill (Pamela): Reading cross-marked stones in Scottish Dalriada.
In JAEMA 2 (2006), pp. 195–208.
Comments on several place names of Western Scotland and on the Old Irish legal term muirchrech.

Kilnave (Islay)

4138.
O’Neill (Pamela): Reading cross-marked stones in Scottish Dalriada.
In JAEMA 2 (2006), pp. 195–208.
Comments on several place names of Western Scotland and on the Old Irish legal term muirchrech.

Kiltarlity, Inverness-shire

10649.
Barron (Hugh): Some notes on the parish of Kiltarlity.
In TGSI 50 (1976–1978), pp. 40–59.
Includes Notes on places.

Kiltober

16110.
Finnegan (Aengus): The topography of Bruidhean Da Choga or Bryanmore Hill, Co. Westmeath.
In Ainm 11 (2012), pp. 65–87.
Focuses on placenames mentioned in Bruiden Da Choca and their connection with modern townland names in the vicinity of Bruidhean Da Choga: Kiltober, Carrickaneha, Cloghbreen, Bryanbeg Lower, Bryanbeg Upper, Bryanmore Lower, Bryanmore Upper, Lough Slania, Creevenamanagh.

Kilvoro

1959.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): Cill Mhura agus Screathan.
In Éigse 27 (1993), p. 58.
On the identification of Kilvoro; ad D. Ó Muirithe, in Éigse 24 (1993), pp. 68-70.

Kilvurra

1959.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): Cill Mhura agus Screathan.
In Éigse 27 (1993), p. 58.
On the identification of Kilvoro; ad D. Ó Muirithe, in Éigse 24 (1993), pp. 68-70.

Kincardine

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.
4438.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Tain, Cadzow, Cockleroy and Prenderguest.
In ScotL 21 (2002), pp. 27–42.
1. Cardenden and Kincardine revisited; 2. The river Teign of Devon and Tain, Ross-shire; 3. Gask and ‘Uggelville’, near Perth; 4. Cadzow, the old name of Hamilton; 5. Cockleroy, near Linlithgow; 6. Prenderguest, Berwickshire; 7. Callendar, The White Land, and Falkirk in Le lai de desiré.

Kincardine, Ross and Cromarty

10675.
Watson (Adam): Gillies Lobban’s manuscript.
In TGSI 55 (1986–1988), pp. 73–105.
Appendix contains comments on some place-names from the parish of Kincardine, Ross and Cromarty.

Kincora

1471.
Bradley (John): Killaloe: a pre-Norman borough?
In Peritia 8 (1994), pp. 170–179.
Traces the early history of Killaloe (Cell Da Lua) and Kincora (Ceann Coradh).

Kings Stables

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

Kinnatalloon

15445.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Kinnatalloon: its original Irish name.
In JCHAS 116 (2011), pp. 81–85.
< Cinéal Talamhnaigh.

Kirk (Sco) (in place names)

13694.
Muhr (Kay): Ulster place-name links between Gaelic, English and Scots, starting with Kill.
In Language links (2001), pp. 257–272.
On the anglicization of place names containing Ir. CilI.

Kirkcaldy

4419.
Taylor (Simon): Some early Scottish place-names and Queen Margaret.
In ScotL 13 (1994), pp. 1–17.
Examines the names of the places granted to the church by Queen Margaret and Malcolm III [particularly Pitbauchlie, Pitliver, Pardusin and Kirkcaldy].
4427.
Breeze (Andrew): Etymological notes on Kirkcaldy, jocteleg ‘knife’, kiaugh ‘trouble’, striffen ‘membrane’ and cow ‘hobgolin’.
In ScotL 16 (1997), pp. 97–110.
Suggests Scots kiaugh, striffen, are Gaelic loan words (< ciach, srebann).

kiutagh (Mx)

3966.
Braidwood (J.): Terms for ‘left-handed’ in the Ulster dialects.
In UF 18 (1972), pp. 98–110.

Knockbo, Co. Westmeath

10600.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth): The landscape of Máel Sechnaill’s rígdál at Ráith Áeda, AD 859.
In Above and beyond [Swan memorial essays] (2005), pp. 267–280.
Suggests the site of the royal meeting was Cnoc Buadha (Knockbo in the parish of Rahugh, Co. Westmeath).

Knockfergus

2299.
Hughes (A. J.): On the Ulster place-names: Glynn, Glenavy, Carrickfergus and Forkill.
In Ainm 5 (1991), pp. 92–107.

Knowth

1881.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The eponym of Cnogba.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 27–38.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 155-164.

Knowth (Cnogba)

510.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): Ilfhás ar ainm clúiteach (Cnogba > Knowth, Craud, Ballinacrad, Crewbane).
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 523–532.

koi (Og)

480.
Eska (Joseph F.): The deictic pronominal *ḱey in Celtic.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 153–155.
1. Old Irish ; 2. Gaulish duci; 3. Ogham koi and a Gaulish ghost form; 4. Gaulish isoc; 5. Middle Cornish keth.
1006.
Hamp (Eric P.): Gaulish ci, -c, Old Irish , Ogam koi.
In Celtica 24 (2003), p. 129.

kreahkir (ScG)

904.
Kelly (Fergus): Varia: III. Old Irish creccaire, Scottish Gaelic kreahkir.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 185–186.
On ScG creacair.

*kunobranos

1228.
Hughes (A. J.): Old Welsh Cunbran/Conbran < *kunobranos ‘wolf-raven’, in the light of Old Irish Conbran(n).
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 95–98.
vs. P. Sims-Williams, in BBCS 38 (1991), p. 39.
Sims-Williams (P.) (ref.)

*kwus(s)

1235.
McCone (Kim): Varia: II. Old Irish co, cucci ‘as far as (him, it)' and Latin usque ‘as far as’.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 171–176.
co ‘to’ < *kwus(s) ‘as far as’; 3sg. f. and 3pl. forms of prep. oc ‘by’ with voiceless stop modelled on conjugated forms of prep. co ‘to’ and not vice versa (vs. GOI 502).

kyttagh (Mx)

3966.
Braidwood (J.): Terms for ‘left-handed’ in the Ulster dialects.
In UF 18 (1972), pp. 98–110.