Words and Proper Names

jamb (Engl)

1693.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Gaimbí, gaimbín, ‘gombeen’.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 109–113.
Gaimbí ‘interest (of money)' < Engl. cambie; gaimbín ‘bit (esp. of tobacco)' < gamba ‘leg’ (related to Fr. gambe, jambe and Engl. gamb, jamb; both words confused. Provides early exx of gombeen(-man) from 1845 and 1859.

jambe (Fr)

1693.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Gaimbí, gaimbín, ‘gombeen’.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 109–113.
Gaimbí ‘interest (of money)' < Engl. cambie; gaimbín ‘bit (esp. of tobacco)' < gamba ‘leg’ (related to Fr. gambe, jambe and Engl. gamb, jamb; both words confused. Provides early exx of gombeen(-man) from 1845 and 1859.

James II, King of England, Scotland and Ireland (1633–1701)

1887.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): Briseadh na Bóinne.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 83–106.
The account in Gaelic poetry of the Battle of the Boyne and its aftermath.

jannoo (Mx)

11043.
Broderick (George): The imperfect and secondary future in late spoken Manx.
In SGS 28 (2011), pp. 307–332.
Examines the use of the imperfect and the secondary future of Late Spoken Manx in (1) the substantive verb, (2) the verb jannoo (used as an auxiliary), (3) the regular verb, and (4) the irregular, modal and defective verbs, offering a comparison with their use in Irish and Scottish Gaelic.

je (Slavic)

714.
Kortlandt (Frederik): The Old Irish absolute and conjunct endings and questions of relative chronology.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 35–53.
1. Introduction; 2. Cowgill’s theory (‘The origins of the Insular Celtic conjunct and absolute verbal endings’, Flexion und Wortbildung 40-70); 3. Chronology; 4. Loss of *-i; 5. 2nd sg.; 6. Thematic flexion; 7. Greek; 8. Baltic; 9. Slavic; 10. Tocharian; 11. Latin; 12. Irish; 13. u-diphthongs; 14. i-diphthongs; 15. *ē; 16. Shortening; 17. Palatalization; 18. Raising; 19. u-infection; 20. 1st sg.; 21 Shortening; 22. 2nd sg.; 23. 3rd sg.; 24. Plural forms; 25. Lowering; 26. Apocope; 27. Syncope; 28. Subjunctive; 29. Secondary endings; 30. Future; 31. Passive preterit; 32. Relative forms; 33. Etymology; 34. Slavic je; 35. Slavic jest.
Cowgill (Warren) (ref.)

jest (Slavic)

714.
Kortlandt (Frederik): The Old Irish absolute and conjunct endings and questions of relative chronology.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 35–53.
1. Introduction; 2. Cowgill’s theory (‘The origins of the Insular Celtic conjunct and absolute verbal endings’, Flexion und Wortbildung 40-70); 3. Chronology; 4. Loss of *-i; 5. 2nd sg.; 6. Thematic flexion; 7. Greek; 8. Baltic; 9. Slavic; 10. Tocharian; 11. Latin; 12. Irish; 13. u-diphthongs; 14. i-diphthongs; 15. *ē; 16. Shortening; 17. Palatalization; 18. Raising; 19. u-infection; 20. 1st sg.; 21 Shortening; 22. 2nd sg.; 23. 3rd sg.; 24. Plural forms; 25. Lowering; 26. Apocope; 27. Syncope; 28. Subjunctive; 29. Secondary endings; 30. Future; 31. Passive preterit; 32. Relative forms; 33. Etymology; 34. Slavic je; 35. Slavic jest.
Cowgill (Warren) (ref.)

Jezebel

1416.
Poppe (Erich): Varia: II. King Ahab, Boia, Mac Da Thó and Ailill.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 169–171.
The beginning of the biblical story of Ahab and Jezebel concerning wives’ advice (1 Kings, 21.4-5) served as a model in Wales and in Ireland (e.g. Scéla muicce Meic Da Thó, Fled Bricrenn).

jockteleg (Sco.)

4427.
Breeze (Andrew): Etymological notes on Kirkcaldy, jocteleg ‘knife’, kiaugh ‘trouble’, striffen ‘membrane’ and cow ‘hobgolin’.
In ScotL 16 (1997), pp. 97–110.
Suggests Scots kiaugh, striffen, are Gaelic loan words (< ciach, srebann).

John (Lord of Ireland)

1312.
Nicholls (K. W.): A Charter of John, Lord of Ireland, in favour of Matthew ua Hénni, archbishop of Cashel.
In Peritia 2 (1983), pp. 267–276.
Ed. of Lat charter (1192×1193) with identifications and commentary on place-names mentioned therein from MS PROL C 146/9841.

John of Fordun

4482.
Scott (William W.): John of Fordun’s description of the Western Isles.
In ScS 23 (1979), pp. 1–13.
On the source of the Scottish and Manx placenames mentioned in Chronica gentis Scottorum II.10.