Words and Proper Names

-i̯-

532.
Cullen (John): Varia: I. Primitive Irish vowels in final syllables following i̯.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 227–229.

*-i

714.
Kortlandt (Frederik): The Old Irish absolute and conjunct endings and questions of relative chronology.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 35–53.
1. Introduction; 2. Cowgill’s theory (‘The origins of the Insular Celtic conjunct and absolute verbal endings’, Flexion und Wortbildung 40-70); 3. Chronology; 4. Loss of *-i; 5. 2nd sg.; 6. Thematic flexion; 7. Greek; 8. Baltic; 9. Slavic; 10. Tocharian; 11. Latin; 12. Irish; 13. u-diphthongs; 14. i-diphthongs; 15. *ē; 16. Shortening; 17. Palatalization; 18. Raising; 19. u-infection; 20. 1st sg.; 21 Shortening; 22. 2nd sg.; 23. 3rd sg.; 24. Plural forms; 25. Lowering; 26. Apocope; 27. Syncope; 28. Subjunctive; 29. Secondary endings; 30. Future; 31. Passive preterit; 32. Relative forms; 33. Etymology; 34. Slavic je; 35. Slavic jest.
Cowgill (Warren) (ref.)
1264.
Schrijver (Peter): The Celtic adverbs for ‘against’ and ‘with’ and the early apocope of *-i.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 151–189.
1. The origins of OIr. fri ‘against’, la ‘with’; 2. The early apocope of *-i; 3. The fate of ‘new’ word-final *-t; 4. Examples of *-t(i) > -s in Old Irish; 7. The origin of the Primitive Irish main clause verbal particle *es; 8. The present conjunct forms of the Old Irish copula after *ne ‘not’; 9. Summary.

í

1482.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta [I].
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 207–214.
[1.] Focail áirithe i gcomhardadh (é, í, mac, Íosa, Críost); [2.] Bá. Part II in Éigse 14/4 (1972), pp. 265-68; part III in Éigse 15/2 (1973), pp. 89-92.
1488.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta II.
In Éigse 14/4 (Geimhreadh 1972), pp. 265–268.
[1.] Focail árithe i gcomhardadh (:é, :í, etc.); [2.] Droichead uama. Part [I] in Éigse 14/3 (1972), pp. 207-214; part III in Éigse 15/2 (1973), pp. 89-92.

i bhfus

1565.
McGonagle (Noel): Three Ulster features.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
1. Lenition after iongantach [and millteanach]; 2. i bhfus: On the development from adverb to quaisi-imperative: 'here’ > 'give me’; 3. Tá mé ina shuidhe: On the generalisation of 3rd masc. poss. in ina shuidhe, ina sheasamh, etc. in Ulster and Man.

i dtom(h)as

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

i gcás

1765.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Leaganacha as Conamara.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 150–158.
I. I gcás go: (a) ‘cé go’; (b) `(cuir) i gcás’. II. Dath ‘cuid’, etc. III. An freagra biorránach.

i gcás go

1765.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Leaganacha as Conamara.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 150–158.
I. I gcás go: (a) ‘cé go’; (b) `(cuir) i gcás’. II. Dath ‘cuid’, etc. III. An freagra biorránach.

i leith

1711.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ní íosfainn seachtain é.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 371–378.
[1.] On the use of indefinite nouns with time reference as adverbs meaning ‘over a period of …', e.g. seachtain, , bliain, , coicís in negative contexts in the Irish of An Cheathrú Rua; [2.] i leith an bóthar: on the adverbial use of the nominative of definite nouns following certain compound and nominal prepositions preceded by verbs of motion, e.g. ar aghaidh, i ngiorracht, i leith, timpeall, treasna; [3.] Tá sé ag dul Gaillimh: on the ‘elision’ of the preposition go before place-names.

i leith an bóthar

1711.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ní íosfainn seachtain é.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 371–378.
[1.] On the use of indefinite nouns with time reference as adverbs meaning ‘over a period of …', e.g. seachtain, , bliain, , coicís in negative contexts in the Irish of An Cheathrú Rua; [2.] i leith an bóthar: on the adverbial use of the nominative of definite nouns following certain compound and nominal prepositions preceded by verbs of motion, e.g. ar aghaidh, i ngiorracht, i leith, timpeall, treasna; [3.] Tá sé ag dul Gaillimh: on the ‘elision’ of the preposition go before place-names.

*-i (locative)

703.
McCone (Kim): The dative singular of Old Irish consonant stems.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 26–38.
Derives ‘short’ dative forms from an early apocope of locative *-i, thus arguing against the ‘IE endingless locative’ hypothesis suggested by R. Thurneysen (GOI §315). Also discusses relevance of inn-uraid ‘last year’.
Thurneysen (Rudolf) (ref.)

i n- (subject marker)

1814.
Greene (David): The preposition i n- as subject marker.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 61–67.

i ndéidh

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

i ndiaid

805.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 1. Fer Diad.
In Ériu 33 (1982), p. 178.
‘Man / warrior of the pair’: diad related to dïas ‘two persons’. Also suggests i ndiaid may represent ‘in (its) pairing’ rather than ‘in(to) (its) end’ (cf. i ndiad).

i ngiorracht

1711.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ní íosfainn seachtain é.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 371–378.
[1.] On the use of indefinite nouns with time reference as adverbs meaning ‘over a period of …', e.g. seachtain, , bliain, , coicís in negative contexts in the Irish of An Cheathrú Rua; [2.] i leith an bóthar: on the adverbial use of the nominative of definite nouns following certain compound and nominal prepositions preceded by verbs of motion, e.g. ar aghaidh, i ngiorracht, i leith, timpeall, treasna; [3.] Tá sé ag dul Gaillimh: on the ‘elision’ of the preposition go before place-names.

*i (rounded by preceding labiovelar)

1412.
Schrijver (Peter): Vowel rounding by primitive Irish labiovelars.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 133–137.
Conditions under which PrimIr. *i and *a are rounded by a preceding labiovelar; non-rounding of *e in similar phonetic context.

-í (s-subj)

2870.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On a possible Indo-Celtic etymological correspondence.
In ZCP 54 (2004), pp. 133–143.
Discusses the expression isara fie dúnn (Wb. 25c9), and argues it contains the 3rd sg. rel. of the future of ar-icc.

i (y) (Welsh)

331.
Williams (J. E. Caerwyn): Remarks on a linguistic drift.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 67–82.
On the use of the preposition do to indicate the agent of verbal nouns and related matters; compares and contrasts Welsh i (y).

*-iā

1431.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. (h)uile.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 181–182.
Reconstructs as neuter plural (collective) in *-.

Ia < ē

315.
Breatnach (R. A.): ia < ē in early modern Irish loan-words.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 109–114.
Discusses a number of words borrowed mostly from Middle English, in particular fiabhras, of which it is argued that it derives from MEngl. pl. fēv(e)res.

-iā (abstracts)

458.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 1. On abstracts in - from locativals.
In Celtica 22 (1991), pp. 33–34.

ia (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

ïa (unstressed)

534.
Greene (David): Varia: III. A detail of syncope.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 232–234.
Discussion of ia in unstressed syllables in OIr., including disyllabic forms in ïa, e.g. in verbal forms foídiam, égthiar, dringthiar, rigthier; also discusses relationship between -bïad and -betis of the substantive verb.

ia (unstressed)

534.
Greene (David): Varia: III. A detail of syncope.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 232–234.
Discussion of ia in unstressed syllables in OIr., including disyllabic forms in ïa, e.g. in verbal forms foídiam, égthiar, dringthiar, rigthier; also discusses relationship between -bïad and -betis of the substantive verb.

iad (ScG)

4342.
Hamp (Eric P.): Easter Ross iad-sa.
In SGS 18 (1998), p. 188.
ad Seosamh Watson, in SGS 14/2 (1986), pp. 51–93.

íadaid

10017.
Hamp (Eric P.): Indo-European *(He)op-.
In MSS 40 (1981), pp. 39–60.
ad IEW 323-325. Includes a discussion of the Irish forms listed therein (íarn, íad-, oíbell etc.) and adds Ir. abra to the comparison.

iad-sa (ScG)

4342.
Hamp (Eric P.): Easter Ross iad-sa.
In SGS 18 (1998), p. 188.
ad Seosamh Watson, in SGS 14/2 (1986), pp. 51–93.

Iain

835.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 1. Ir. Eóin, Sc. G. Iain.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 193–195.
From Lat. Iōhănnes.

Íamán

905.
Poppe (Erich): Varia: IV. Émíne, Íamnat, Íamán.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 187–188.
On the pattern of the same element occurring in the names of son, father and mother.

Íamnat

905.
Poppe (Erich): Varia: IV. Émíne, Íamnat, Íamán.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 187–188.
On the pattern of the same element occurring in the names of son, father and mother.

iantu-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

íar

3574.
Greene (David): Perfect and passive in Eastern and Western Gaelic.
In StC 14–15 (1979–1980), pp. 87–94.
On the use of the syntagm íarn+VN to create periphrastic tenses.
10017.
Hamp (Eric P.): Indo-European *(He)op-.
In MSS 40 (1981), pp. 39–60.
ad IEW 323-325. Includes a discussion of the Irish forms listed therein (íarn, íad-, oíbell etc.) and adds Ir. abra to the comparison.

Iär

11309.
Koch (John T.): Celts, Britons and Gaels: names, peoples and identities.
In THSC-NS 9 (2003), pp. 41–56.

iarann Phádraig

7396.
Hughes (A. J.): The term iarann Phádraig ‘St. Patrick’s iron’ as ‘tongs’ in Tyrone Irish.
In SAM 16/2 (1995), pp. 103–106.

íarfine

1423.
McLeod (Neil): Kinship.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 1–22.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] The gelḟine; [3.] The derbḟine; [4.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the íarfine; [5.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the indḟine; [6.] Reckoning kinship by hand; [7.] Summary of proposed model; [8.] Problems with MacNeill’s model; [9.] The problem of the sprightly great-grandfathers; [10.] The problem of the indeterminate gelḟine; [11.] Subsequent modifications to MacNeill’s model; [12.] Supporting evidence: incl. discussion of the relationship between íarmue ‘great-grandson’ and íarfine, and between indue ‘great-great-grandson’ and indḟine; [13.] Conclusion: the basis of the kinship system was the three-generation gelḟine. vs. E. MacNeill, Celtic Ireland, 1921 (Best2 2136); D. Binchy, in PBA 29 (1943), p. 223; T. Charles-Edwards, Early Irish and Welsh kinship (Oxford, 1993); N. Patterson, in BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Binchy (D.) (ref.), Charles-Edwards (T.) (ref.), MacNeill (E.) (ref.), Patterson (N.) (ref.)
3515.
Patterson (Nerys W.): Patrilineal kinship in early Irish society: the evidence from the Irish law texts.
In BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Discusses the terms for the various kinship relations, in particular derbḟine.
3247.
Baumgarten (Rolf): The kindred metaphors in Bechbretha and Coibnes usci thairidne.
In Peritia 4 (1985), pp. 307–327.
On the use of the analogy of the four categories of kinship (gelḟine, derbḟine, íarfine, indḟine) applied to three cases of neighbourhood law: I. Bechbretha §§9-11, 18-22; II. Bechbretha §§12-13; III. Coibnes uisci thairidne §§1-3, 8. With linguistic discussion and English translation.

Appendix: ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 10 (1973), p. 80 §11 [Aithgabál bech].

iargcomharc

15194.
McManus (Damian): Celebrating the female in Classical Irish poetry: the wife.
In Ériu 65 (2015), pp. 137–168.
Examines how the patron’s wife is referred to or addressed in Classical poetry and surveys the qualities most frequently praised in the iargcomhairc addressed to her.

iargomharc

1960.
Breatnach (Pádraig A.): A covenant between Eochaidh Ó hEódhusa and Aodh Mág Uidhir.
In Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 59–66.
Poem by Eochaidh Ó hEódhusa dedic. to Aodh Má Uidhir, beg. Connradh do cheanglas re hAodh; ed. from the Book of the O’Conor Don and UCD MS O’Curry no. 5, with critical apparatus, English translation and notes. Also comments on the iargomharc device.

íar(m-)

3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

íarmae (íarsma)

341.
Breatnach (Liam): On abstract nouns from prepositions in Irish.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 18–19.
Argues that inne, echtrae, aire, íarmae (íarsma) are all -stems.

iarmbérla

2724.
Kalygin (Viktor P.): Indogermanische Dichtersprache und altirische mythopoetische Tradition.
In ZCP 46 (1994), pp. 1–10.
Offers a discussion of the term iarmbérla, which is identified with an Indo-European poetic tradition of concealing sacred names.

íarmue

1423.
McLeod (Neil): Kinship.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 1–22.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] The gelḟine; [3.] The derbḟine; [4.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the íarfine; [5.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the indḟine; [6.] Reckoning kinship by hand; [7.] Summary of proposed model; [8.] Problems with MacNeill’s model; [9.] The problem of the sprightly great-grandfathers; [10.] The problem of the indeterminate gelḟine; [11.] Subsequent modifications to MacNeill’s model; [12.] Supporting evidence: incl. discussion of the relationship between íarmue ‘great-grandson’ and íarfine, and between indue ‘great-great-grandson’ and indḟine; [13.] Conclusion: the basis of the kinship system was the three-generation gelḟine. vs. E. MacNeill, Celtic Ireland, 1921 (Best2 2136); D. Binchy, in PBA 29 (1943), p. 223; T. Charles-Edwards, Early Irish and Welsh kinship (Oxford, 1993); N. Patterson, in BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Binchy (D.) (ref.), Charles-Edwards (T.) (ref.), MacNeill (E.) (ref.), Patterson (N.) (ref.)

iarn aithlegtha

783.
Scott (B. G.): Varia: II. 1. Early Irish cáer; 2. iarn aithlegtha; 3. crédumae.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 153–157.
On the interpretation of various terms relating to metal.

iarseng

10894.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): On the possible origins of Scottish Gaelic iorram ‘rowing song’.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 2 (2006), pp. 232–288.

íarsma (íarmae)

341.
Breatnach (Liam): On abstract nouns from prepositions in Irish.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 18–19.
Argues that inne, echtrae, aire, íarmae (íarsma) are all -stems.

iartrom

10894.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): On the possible origins of Scottish Gaelic iorram ‘rowing song’.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 2 (2006), pp. 232–288.

íarus

3149.
Russell (Paul): Notes on words in early Irish glossaries.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 195–204.
1. íarus; 2. imbas for·osnai; 3 lúathrinde.

íasc

6955.
Hamp (Eric): Fish.
In JIES 1/4 (Winter 1973), pp. 507–511.
On the reconstruction of the Proto-Indo-European etymon of OIr. íasc.

íath

11955.
Malzahn (Melanie): Back into the fields and into the woods: Old Irish íath 'land, field’ and fíad 'wild; deer; uncultivated land’ revisited.
In JIES 39/1-2 (Spring/Summer 2011), pp. 116–128.
16003.
Widmer (Paul): Das Korn des weiten Feldes. Interne Derivation, derivationskette und Flexionsklassenhierarchie: Aspekte der nominalen Wortbildung im Urindogermanischen.
IBS, 111. Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2004. 239 pp.
Rev. by
G. R. Isaac, in JCeltL 10 (2006), pp. 143-144.
Thomas Lindner, in Kratylos 55 (2010), pp. 167-170.
Karin Stüber, in StC 41 (2007), pp. 252-254.

-ib

2904.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Note sur le pronom personnel de la 2e personne du pluriel en vieil irlandais.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 567–570.
Republ. in Lindeman studies, pp. 112-115.

ibar

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.
18003.
Schrijver (Peter): The meaning of Celtic *eburos.
In Mélanges Lambert (2015), pp. 65–76.
Etym. of OIr. ibar.

-ibh (2pl. imper.)

1165.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Varia: IV. 2. On the 2pl. imperative in Scottish Gaelic.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 174–178.
ScG -ibh derives from 2pl. prep. prons used as imperatives, the seeds of which can be traced to OIr. suppletive airci(u)b, argib, ercib ‘go’.

-ibh (dat. pl.)

3801.
Ó Mainnín (Mícheál B.): “Goidé mar 's tá na fearaibh?'': gnéithe de leathnú agus de fhuaimniú fhoirceann an tabharthaigh iolra sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 195–224.
Studies the survival of the dative plural ending -ibh as nominative plural marker in Modern Irish, discussing in particular its spread and distribution across the Gaeltachtaí as well as the effect that the phonological change to í [-i] and ú [-u] has had in the development of the plural markers of East Galway and East Ulster Irish.

-ic

1129.
McCone (Kim): OIr. -ic ‘reaches’, ithid ‘eats’, rigid ‘stretches’ and the PIE ‘Narten’ present in Celtic.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 1–11.
3045.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes de linguistique celtique: 1. Vieil-irlandais -ánaic “est allé''.
In ÉtC 23 (1986), p. 57.
On the origin of the deponent inflection found in the singular preterite.
8908.
García-Ramón (José Luis): Zur Bedeutung indogermanischer Verbalwurzeln: *h2nek̂- ‘erreichen, reichen bis’, *h1nek̂- ‘erhalten, (weg)nehmen’.
In Fs. Forssman (1999), pp. 47–80.
OIr. -ic.
9753.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish do·uccai, do·ratai.
In GS Schindler (1999), pp. 355–364.
Argues that do·uccai derives from an old causative *h2/3ōnḱ-ye/o- to the PIE ‘Narten’ present *h2/3ḗnḱ-ti, *h2/3énḱ-n̥ti, and that do·ratai is an old primary verb (< *deh3- ‘give’) absorbed into the weak a-class.

-icc

1189.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: II. Old Irish -icc.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 199–203.
1224.
Schrijver (Peter): On the development of vowels before tautosyllabic nasals in Primitive Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33–52.
1. Introduction; 2. Rise of nasalized allophones of short vowels; 3. The development of *nt, *nk into PrimIr. unlenited *d, *g; 4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’; 5. Loss of a nasal before a voicless fricative; 6. OIr. téit, -tét; 7. The relation of *nt, *nk > *d, *g to the rounding of vowels by a preceding labiovelar; 8. Summary; App.: The development of PrimIr. *and, *amb, *ang.
2813.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On some ‘laryngeal’ reflexes in Celtic.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 455–468.
Reformulates an Indo-European phonological rule concerning the deletion of laryngeals, and discusses its application to the prehistory of, among others, two Old Irish items: OIr. óac and -icc.
2870.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On a possible Indo-Celtic etymological correspondence.
In ZCP 54 (2004), pp. 133–143.
Discusses the expression isara fie dúnn (Wb. 25c9), and argues it contains the 3rd sg. rel. of the future of ar-icc.
3683.
Isaac (G. R.): Cymraeg rhyngu, rhanc, Hen Wyddeleg ro-icc; Dadl y Corff a’r Enaid ll. 128 dinag.
In StC 36 (2002), pp. 141–145.
ad P. Schrijver' derivation of OIr. -icc < PIE *(h2)ēnḱ-, in Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33-52 [4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’].

-ich

200.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Transition zones, hyperdialectisms and historical change: the case of final unstressed -igh/-ich and -idh in Scottish Gaelic.
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 195–233.

ích n-erred

7651.
Sayers (William): Martial feats in the Old Irish Ulster cycle.
In CJIS/RCÉI 9/1 (1983), pp. 45–80.
Examines the early Irish lists of cles and discusses the individual feats, primarily those associated with Cú Chulainn in Táin bó Cúailnge (cf. TBC 1 ll. 1714-1719): 1. ubullchless; 2. fáeborchless; 3. fáenchless; 4. cless cletenach; 5.téchtless; 6. corpchless; 7. cless caitt; 8. ích n-erred; 9. cor ndeled; 10. léim dar néib/néim; 11. filliud erred náir; 12. gái bolga; 13. bái brasse; 14. rothchless; 15. ochtarchless; 16. cless for análaib; 17. bruud gine; 18. sian caurad; 19. béim co commus; 20. táithbéim; 21. dréim fri fogaist agus agus dírgud crette fora rind co fonnadm níad náir.

icht

17974.
ar Bihan (Herve): Kudennoù anvadur morioù Breizh.
In Hor yezh 233 (2003), pp. 33–46.
Discussion also concerns Irish versions of this toponymy: Muir Bhreatan, Muir Éireann, Muir nIocht, etc.

id

764.
Hamp (Eric P.): Old Irish ed, id.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20–29.
Discusses the etym. of (I) OIr. ed ‘space, distance, interval, etc.' and related ined (later inad) ‘place, spot, position, etc.', and id ‘withe, fetter, etc.', all from basic PIE root *ped- ‘foot’; and argues against C. Marstrander (in BILL: 1471) that achad and machad are compounds of an s-stem with a second element *-edo- from the above-mentioned PIE root.

Revised by the author in ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74-75.
2707.
Hamp (Eric P.): Ad ZCP 34, 1975, 20 ff.
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74–75.
Revision of E. P. Hamp, Old Irish ed, id, in ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20-29.

id (agent suffix)

4247.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 3. baid ‘stultus’.
In Ériu 39 (1988), p. 191.
ad Wb. (prima manus) 12d35. Suggests that the last segment of báeth ‘foolish’ has been reinterpreted as the agentive suffix -id.

Idad (?)

1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.

idama (Lat)

1473.
Howlett (David): Insular Latin idama, iduma.
In Peritia 9 (1995), pp. 72–80.
Argues (vs. A. Breen, in Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 40-50) it is a Hebraism and its original form is idama.
Breen (A.) (ref.)

idath

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

idbart

8309.
Hamp (Eric P.): Religon and law from Iguvium.
In JIES 1/3 (Fall 1973), pp. 318–323.
Umbrian ařfertur is compared to OIr. ad·opair.

-idh

200.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Transition zones, hyperdialectisms and historical change: the case of final unstressed -igh/-ich and -idh in Scottish Gaelic.
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 195–233.
2467.
Ó Sé (Diarmuid): The verbal ending -idh/-igh in Munster dialects.
In Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 71–80.
Examines the deletion and retention of -g before subject pronouns in Munster Irish and rejects O. J. Bergin's 1904 (in Best1, p. 48) and T. F. O’Rahilly's explanation (in Best2 527) by phonological change.

i-diphthongs

714.
Kortlandt (Frederik): The Old Irish absolute and conjunct endings and questions of relative chronology.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 35–53.
1. Introduction; 2. Cowgill’s theory (‘The origins of the Insular Celtic conjunct and absolute verbal endings’, Flexion und Wortbildung 40-70); 3. Chronology; 4. Loss of *-i; 5. 2nd sg.; 6. Thematic flexion; 7. Greek; 8. Baltic; 9. Slavic; 10. Tocharian; 11. Latin; 12. Irish; 13. u-diphthongs; 14. i-diphthongs; 15. *ē; 16. Shortening; 17. Palatalization; 18. Raising; 19. u-infection; 20. 1st sg.; 21 Shortening; 22. 2nd sg.; 23. 3rd sg.; 24. Plural forms; 25. Lowering; 26. Apocope; 27. Syncope; 28. Subjunctive; 29. Secondary endings; 30. Future; 31. Passive preterit; 32. Relative forms; 33. Etymology; 34. Slavic je; 35. Slavic jest.
Cowgill (Warren) (ref.)

idir

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

Ιδουμα

471.
Breen (Aidan): Iduma (Ιδουμα).
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 40–50.
Origin and meaning of iduma ‘hand (of Almighty God)' as used in Altus prosator, Hisperica famina, etc. Cf. D. Howlett, in Peritia 9 (1995), pp. 72–80.
Howlett (D.) (ref.)

idu

7966.
Schindler (Jochem): Armenisch erkn, griechisch ὀδύνη, irisch idu.
In HS 89 (1976), pp. 53–65.

iduma (Lat)

471.
Breen (Aidan): Iduma (Ιδουμα).
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 40–50.
Origin and meaning of iduma ‘hand (of Almighty God)' as used in Altus prosator, Hisperica famina, etc. Cf. D. Howlett, in Peritia 9 (1995), pp. 72–80.
Howlett (D.) (ref.)
1473.
Howlett (David): Insular Latin idama, iduma.
In Peritia 9 (1995), pp. 72–80.
Argues (vs. A. Breen, in Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 40-50) it is a Hebraism and its original form is idama.
Breen (A.) (ref.)

-ie ∼ -in

604.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Place-names as a resource for the historical linguist.
In Uses of place-names (1998), pp. 12–53.
Discusses a number of linguistic features of Irish and Scottish place-names, incl. fossils of neuter gender, lenition, eclipsis, and -in ⁓ -ie variation and -ach in Scottish place-names.

*i̯em-

3466.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 4. Two Celtic reflexes of *i̯em-.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 146–147.
ad E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 172-74. On do ·em, dítiu, and compounds of -em.

ientu-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

i(e)ntu-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

Iffa and Offa

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

ifreann

15855.
Ní Chrábhagáin (Ciara): Disease and illness in medieval Ireland: an anthropological examination of some hagiographical material.
In RíM 24 (2013), pp. 115–133.
Examines the usage of names of illnesses and diseases occurring in the text of Bethada náem nÉrenn: 1. amlabar, bacach, bodhar, clamhdall, lobhar; 2. aillse, fiolun fionn, easbadha, cuthach; scamach, lirach, moirtin marbh, bás obann, ifreann; esláinte theinntidhe, galar cos, demhan.

-igh

200.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Transition zones, hyperdialectisms and historical change: the case of final unstressed -igh/-ich and -idh in Scottish Gaelic.
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 195–233.
2467.
Ó Sé (Diarmuid): The verbal ending -idh/-igh in Munster dialects.
In Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 71–80.
Examines the deletion and retention of -g before subject pronouns in Munster Irish and rejects O. J. Bergin's 1904 (in Best1, p. 48) and T. F. O’Rahilly's explanation (in Best2 527) by phonological change.

-igí

831.
Ó Murchú (Máirtín): The 2pl. imperative in Modern Irish.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 163–171.
On the origin of -igí and related forms.

-igidir

12607.
Le Mair (Esther): Why a single burst or multiple scatterings can make all the difference: the patterns underlying the formation of AI and AII verbs.
In SCF 10 (2013), pp. 65–80.
Investigates the underlying motivation for ā- and ı̄-verbs to be formed as a verb of either class.

il

17128.
Zimmer (Stefan): Gallisch DIVERTOMV, kymrisch llawer, tocharisch A want-wraske.
In Sound law and analogy [Fs. Beekes] (1997), pp. 353–358.
§2. “Altkymrisch lauer'' also concerns OIr. loor, lour and il.

ilach

10786.
Bjorvand (Harald), Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Über ‘Schaum’ und ‘Getöse’ und Namen von Inseln‚ Seen und Fjorden.
In HS 120 (2007), pp. 285–300.
§4.4 Altirisch ilach m [< PC *elu-ko-, compared to Gmc. *elma-].

Illandon (> Illadon)

1528.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Cess Naíden.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), p. 252.
naíden < noínden and the occasional development nd > d in Middle Irish, e.g. (Slíab) Monduirn > (Slíab) Moduirn, Illandon > Illadon, tindnacol > tidnacol.

Illaunnacuirree

8685.
Mac Cárthaigh (Mícheál): Additional note on Illaunnacuirree.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), p. 46.
Addendum to Dinnseanchas 5/1 (Jun., 1972), p. 9.

illé

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.

i-lle(i)

1608.
Hamp (Eric P.): Lloegr: the Welsh name for England.
In CMCS 4 (Winter 1982), pp. 83–85.
On the etymology of W Lloegr; some discussion of OIr. i-lle(i) ‘hither’.

Illeray

4455.
Fraser (Ian): The place-names of Illeray.
In ScS 17 (1973), pp. 155–161.

im (fo)

619.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Verbal particles and preverbs in late Middle Irish.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 153–184.
1. Introduction; 2. The textual tradition of Rec. II [of TBC in LL]; Non-historical ro, dos-, ros-, rita-; 4. (Im)mus-; 5. The prefix im/fo; 6. The prefix con; 7. Con for co n-; 8. The origin of late preverbs and particles.

imagery

1735.
Ó Dúshláine (Tadhg): Nóta ar cheapadóireacht an Chéitinnigh.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 87–92.
Discusses the metaphor of chess applied to human existence, as used by Keating in Trí bior-ghaoithe an bháis.

imallé

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.

Ímar

13689.
Nikolaeva (Natalia A.): On the phonology of the OIr. names Amlaíb, Ímar, Tomrair.
In Language links (2001), pp. 116–118.

imb- (intensive)

3468.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 2. *Haéndhi and *Hambhí.
In Ériu 28 (1977), p. 145.
ad E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163-167 [Varia I: 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs]. Argues that OIr. and- and imb- are respectively the old locative and instrumental of a PIE root noun *Haen- ‘top’.

imbárach

293.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Old Irish imbúarach ‘this morning’, imbárach ‘tomorrow morning’.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 108–112.
345.
Hamp (Eric P.): Imbúarach, imbárach.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 53–54.
Cf. A. Ahlqvist, in Celtica 12, pp. 108-112.
4693.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Another look at Old Irish imbúaruch ‘this morning’, imbárach ‘tomorrow morning’.
11458.
Ziegler (Sabine): Altirisch (im)bárach und ved. bhā́r̥jīka-: eine uridg. Kollokation.
In HS 124 (2011), pp. 268–276.

imbas

2820.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): How the Táin was lost.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 603–609.
Identifies a theme of Indo-European mythology in the association of water bodies with the loss and renewal of life and knowledge seen in the death of the two repositories of the Táin, Roán and Roae, and the subsequent preservation of the saga by Fergus mac Roich, thus arguing that this episode is not an incidental addition, but an inextricable part of the larger framework of the narrative.

imbas forosnai

468.
Bramsbäck (Birgit): Synge’s Old Maurya and Old Irish imbas forosnai.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 17–27.
1208.
Carey (John): The three things required of a poet.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 41–58.
imbas forosnai, teinm laedo, díchetal di chennaib.
12214.
Hollo (Kaarina): ‘Finn and the man in the tree’ as a verbal icon.
In The Gaelic Finn tradition (2012), pp. 50–61.
Discusses the second part of the tale cited in the OIr. glossing on the Senchas már as an explanation for imbas forosnai (CIH iii 879.23-880.14), suggesting a possible Christian interpretation of the forest scene with Derg Corra and the latter’s recognition by Finn.

imbas for·osnai

3149.
Russell (Paul): Notes on words in early Irish glossaries.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 195–204.
1. íarus; 2. imbas for·osnai; 3 lúathrinde.

imbL

3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.
3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

imbolc

3575.
Hamp (Eric P.): imbolc, óimelc.
In StC 14–15 (1979–1980), pp. 106–113.
5351.
Williams (Éimear): Bealtaine and Imbolg (oimelc) in Cormac’s Glossary.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 123–143.
Examines the definitions of bel, belltaine and oimelc in Cormac’s Glossary and criticises the received assumptions concerning the festivals of Beltaine and Imbolg which derive from a wrong interpretation of these particular glosses.

Imbolg

5351.
Williams (Éimear): Bealtaine and Imbolg (oimelc) in Cormac’s Glossary.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 123–143.
Examines the definitions of bel, belltaine and oimelc in Cormac’s Glossary and criticises the received assumptions concerning the festivals of Beltaine and Imbolg which derive from a wrong interpretation of these particular glosses.

imb ·said-

3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.
692.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. imb ·said-, impuide.
In Ériu 28 (1977), p. 145.
ad E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 24 (1973), p. 175-177 [Varia I: 8. Some compounds of téit: 6. imb·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’].

im(b) ·tét

3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.

imbúarach

293.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Old Irish imbúarach ‘this morning’, imbárach ‘tomorrow morning’.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 108–112.
345.
Hamp (Eric P.): Imbúarach, imbárach.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 53–54.
Cf. A. Ahlqvist, in Celtica 12, pp. 108-112.

imbúaruch

4693.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Another look at Old Irish imbúaruch ‘this morning’, imbárach ‘tomorrow morning’.
11458.
Ziegler (Sabine): Altirisch (im)bárach und ved. bhā́r̥jīka-: eine uridg. Kollokation.
In HS 124 (2011), pp. 268–276.

imchomarc

16538.
Hayden (Deborah): A medieval Irish dialogue between Priscian and Donatus on the categories of questions.
In Dá dtrian feasa fiafraighidh (2017), pp. 67–93.
Discusses the H 3. 18 version of the tract on the ‘divisions of imchomarc'.

imdell

10605.
Binchy (D. A.): Brewing in eighth-century Ireland.
In Studies on early Ireland [Duignan essays] (1982), pp. 3–6.
ad Cáin aicillne §8 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen, in ZCP 14 (1923), pp. 336-394 [1. Das Unfrei-Lehen], etc.); particularly on the process of mashing (OIr. imdell).

imgnadad

3414.
Quin (E. G.): Three notes: 3. Ad Celtica 14, 132.
In Celtica 15 (1983), p. 141.
Further notes on variant readings aigseradh and imgnadad from ed. of poem Día mór dom imdegail.

imirce

3236.
Simms (Katharine): Nomadry in medieval Ireland: the origins of the creaght or caoraigheacht.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 379–391.
Term first recorded in 1390 (Annals of Ulster).

imirt

1936.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 160–164.
1. *airmnecht; 2. crioslach; 3. daorach; 4. fabhairne; 5. fearacht; 6. imirt; 7. isteal; 8. praistéal.

imm

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

immainse

1170.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VI. 3. immainse, immainsi.
In Ériu 53 (2003), p. 185.

immainsi

1170.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VI. 3. immainse, immainsi.
In Ériu 53 (2003), p. 185.

immaire

3225.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Some words for `(man-made) ridge’ in Irish: fu(i)th(a)irbe; immaire; indra, indrad.
In BBCS 26/4 (May 1976), pp. 445–449.

imm-(a-N)

18316.
Dedio (Stefan), Widmer (Paul): S, A, and P argument demotion with preverbal imm-(a-N) in Old and Middle Irish.
In ÉtC 43 (2017), pp. 187–206.

immarchor uanán

9598.
Sayers (William): Games, sport and para-military exercise in early Ireland.
In Aethlon 10/1 (Fall 1992), pp. 105–123.
Reviews D. Binchy's discussion (in Celtica 8.144) of the terms for games and sports named in Mellbretha: 1. lúb, líathróit; 2. corthe críche; 3. tochailt trebán; 4. lém; 5. snám; 6. sraenán; 7. brandub; 8. fidchell; 9. buanfach; 10. folach migán; 11. immarchor uanán; 12. ardchless co n-ublaib; 13. bocluasc; 14. echréim; 15. cor cloiche; 16. dréim; 17. léim; 18. díbirciud; 19. uathad fri hilar; 20. crosdibirciud; 21. táithe tuilche; 22. bundsach i n-airecht.

Appendix: A synthetic version of the lists of martial feats (cles) as found in the Ulster cycle of tales.

imme-airic

3144.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Préverbes gaulois suffixes en -io-: ambio, ario-, cantio-.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 115–121.
Examines the Continental Celtic background of nouns derived from prepositions (in particular ar, imm, cét-); also discusses Old Irish compound verbs with petrified neuter infix pronoung (ara-chrin, imme-airic, ceta-bí).

immirge

3236.
Simms (Katharine): Nomadry in medieval Ireland: the origins of the creaght or caoraigheacht.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 379–391.
Term first recorded in 1390 (Annals of Ulster).

immorchor ṅdelend

785.
Sayers (William): Varia: IV. Three charioteering gifts in Táin bó Cúailnge and Mesca Ulad: immorchor ṅdelend, foscul ṅdíriuch, léim dar boilg.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 163–167.
immorchor ṅdelend: ‘use of charioteer’s wand to sight a straight course and to hold the chariot on this course over long distances’; foscul ṅdíriuch (‘straight / level cleaving or sundering’); léim dar boilg (‘leaping across a gorge / gap / chasm’ as compliment to the other two skills).

immram

681.
Dumville (David N.): Echtrae and immram: some problems of definition.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 73–94.
Relevance of Immram Brain.
1757.
Carey (John): The location of the Otherworld in the Irish tradition.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 36–43.
Argues that the idea of the overseas Otherworld is not natural to the Irish tradition.

Republ. in The Otherworld voyage in early Irish literature, pp. 113-119.

(Im)mus-

619.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Verbal particles and preverbs in late Middle Irish.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 153–184.
1. Introduction; 2. The textual tradition of Rec. II [of TBC in LL]; Non-historical ro, dos-, ros-, rita-; 4. (Im)mus-; 5. The prefix im/fo; 6. The prefix con; 7. Con for co n-; 8. The origin of late preverbs and particles.

Imper

8678.
Mhac an Fhailigh (Éamonn): Tuilleadh fá Imper.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), p. 3.
A further suggestion as to the possible meaning of the name Emper in Co. Westmeath.

Impir

8678.
Mhac an Fhailigh (Éamonn): Tuilleadh fá Imper.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), p. 3.
A further suggestion as to the possible meaning of the name Emper in Co. Westmeath.

impuide

3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.
692.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. imb ·said-, impuide.
In Ériu 28 (1977), p. 145.
ad E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 24 (1973), p. 175-177 [Varia I: 8. Some compounds of téit: 6. imb·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’].

imthánud

3034.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 20. OIr. tánaise, imthánud, ‘alternation’.
In ÉtC 22 (1985), p. 199.

-ín

601.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Forás na ndeirí díspeagtha -ean agus -ein i nGaeilge na hAlban.
In Béalra (2001), pp. 1–43.
Considers the development of diminutive suffixes -én, -ín, -án in Scottish Gaelic.

iN

1130.
Schrijver (Peter): The development of Primitive Irish *aN before voiced stop.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 13–25.
Explains the distribution of aN and iN before voiced stops in Irish.

-in

1567.
Breatnach (R. A.): The formant -in.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 232–234.
On the adverbial suffix -in, e.g. feastain, chuigint, choíchin, thoirin, anallain, ScG mu dhéidhinn, amháin, etc.; suggests -in originated in éicin.

in

14469.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): The four types of Welsh yn.
In TPhS 113/3 (Nov. 2015), pp. 286–304.
§5.2: ynr and Old Irish ocr; §5.3: ynr + verbal noun compared with Old Irish in, etc. + verbal noun.

-in ∼ -ie

604.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Place-names as a resource for the historical linguist.
In Uses of place-names (1998), pp. 12–53.
Discusses a number of linguistic features of Irish and Scottish place-names, incl. fossils of neuter gender, lenition, eclipsis, and -in ⁓ -ie variation and -ach in Scottish place-names.

i(n) (+ possessive)

815.
Ó hUrmoltaigh (Nollaig): I(n) + possessive in Modern Irish.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 135–142.
Also on the ‘elision’ / ‘loss’ of i(n) before possessives.

in (article)

2657.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Indogermanische Demonstrativa und der altirische Artikel.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 259–271.
Traces the development of the Old Irish article from its origin in the Indo-European demonstrative stem *so/to- to its partial substitution by the root *sem- ‘one’.

-ín (diminutive suffix)

4700.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Notes on the diminutive suffix ín in Modern Irish.

iN (‘in which’)

865.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 3. The transparency of *Heen(+ i).
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 180–181.
*Heen ‘therein, thereat’: iN ‘in which’ without surface relative, and its relation to anticipatory use of and / ann in sentences beginning is and / ann.

ina déidh-che ‘after her’

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

ina sheasamh

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.
1565.
McGonagle (Noel): Three Ulster features.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
1. Lenition after iongantach [and millteanach]; 2. i bhfus: On the development from adverb to quaisi-imperative: 'here’ > 'give me’; 3. Tá mé ina shuidhe: On the generalisation of 3rd masc. poss. in ina shuidhe, ina sheasamh, etc. in Ulster and Man.

ina shuí

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.
1690.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Tá sé ina shuí, etc.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 89–103.
ad N. McGonagle, in Éigse 16/3 (1976), pp. 218-220.

ina shuidhe

1565.
McGonagle (Noel): Three Ulster features.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
1. Lenition after iongantach [and millteanach]; 2. i bhfus: On the development from adverb to quaisi-imperative: 'here’ > 'give me’; 3. Tá mé ina shuidhe: On the generalisation of 3rd masc. poss. in ina shuidhe, ina sheasamh, etc. in Ulster and Man.

inad

764.
Hamp (Eric P.): Old Irish ed, id.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20–29.
Discusses the etym. of (I) OIr. ed ‘space, distance, interval, etc.' and related ined (later inad) ‘place, spot, position, etc.', and id ‘withe, fetter, etc.', all from basic PIE root *ped- ‘foot’; and argues against C. Marstrander (in BILL: 1471) that achad and machad are compounds of an s-stem with a second element *-edo- from the above-mentioned PIE root.

Revised by the author in ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74-75.
2707.
Hamp (Eric P.): Ad ZCP 34, 1975, 20 ff.
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74–75.
Revision of E. P. Hamp, Old Irish ed, id, in ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20-29.

inailt

412.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Inailt ‘foster-sister, fosterling’.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 185–191.
On the semantic shift to ‘servant’.

inauguration

735.
Simms (Katharine): Gabh umad a Fheidhlimidh. A fifteenth-century inauguration ode?
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 132–145.
Poem beg. Gabh umad a Fheidhlimidh addressed to Feidhlim(idh) Fionn, son of Ó Conchobhair Ruadh and composed by the historian Torna Ua Maoil Chonaire (†1468) c. 1464-66. Refers to two other poems possibly composed by same author, i.e. Tosach féile fairsinge, addressed to Tomaltach son of Conchobhar Óg MacDiarmada, chief of Magh Luirg (†1458); Buaidh n-easbaig ar Ardachadh, addressed to Cormac MagShamhradhain, bishop of Ardagh 1444-ca. 1476. Notes association of ae freislighe metre with informal poetry and its use by gifted amateurs rather than professional bards.

inber

8230.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Continuity and innovation in Early Irish words for ‘water expanse’.
In Studien zum indogermanischen Wortschatz (1987), pp. 83–99.
Inland pool, lake: linn and loch; Coastal inlet: inber, gabul, gobél, cúan and muincenn; The sea: muir, ler, fairrge and ocían.
10735.
Stalmaszczyk (Piotr), Witczak (Krzysztof Tomasz): Studies in Indo-European vocabulary.
In IF 98 (1993), pp. 24–39.
Pt. 1. Indo-Celtica: On two Indo-Celtic terms connected with water [2. Old Irish ber/bir ‘water, spring’ and Sanskrit bharúḥ m. ‘sea’].

Inber Cíchmaine

11665.
Breatnach (Liam): Dinnseanchas Inbhear Chíochmhaine, ‘trí comaccomail na Góedelge’, agus caibidil i stair litriú na Gaeilge.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 37–55.
Studies the use of pseudo-archaic spelling in texts found in a handful of sixteenth-century Irish manuscripts (particularly TCD H 3. 18, Harley 5280 and RIA 23 N 10).

Inber in Ríg

10998.
Breeze (Andrew): Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin, Fiachna son of Báitán and Bamburgh.
In SGS 24 (2008), pp. 87–95.
ad ll. 482-485–3 (ed. D. A. Binchy, 1963); on the place-name Inber in Ríg.

Inbhear Iascaigh

6348.
Egan (Bartholomew): Dún Mhuire, Killiney, Co. Dublin.
In DHR 25/2 (Mar. 1972), pp. 75–76.
Formerly known as ‘Inveruisk’ (Ir. Inbhear Iascaigh).

Inch St. Laurence

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Inch, Ballinvoher, Co. Kerry

9789.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): To Chellóc mac Oíbléni: saint and places.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 258–267.
On the identification of four cult sites associated with Mo Chellóg: Inisvickillane, Ballinrannig, Inis Labrainne (now Inch in the parish of Ballinvoher) and Cell Mo Cheallóg (now Kilmakillogue).

Inchcolm

6715.
Márkus (Gilbert): Tracing Emon: Insula Sancti Columbae de Emonia.
In IR 55/1 (Spring 2004), pp. 1–9.
On the origin and meaning of the name Emonia, older alternative for Inchcolm, Fife.

inchróes

2782.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Five notes: [2.] ginchróes, inchróes.
In Celtica 10 (1973), pp. 142–144.

in-cosaig

3646.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On the origin of Welsh dangosaf, dangos.
In StC 28 (1994), pp. 178–179.
Compared to OIr. *do-inchosaig.

ind-

3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

ind

3467.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 3. *Heńdhi and *Heembhi.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 145–146.
Discusses the irregular PIE ablaut patterns underlying OIr. ind and W ym.
5310.
Gensler (Orin D.): Why should a demonstrative turn into a preposition? The evolution of Welsh predicative yn.
In Language 78 (2002), pp. 710–764.
Includes a discussion of the Old Irish adverbial particle ind-.

ind- / en-

679.
Armstrong (John): Phonological irregularity in compound verb forms in the Würzburg Glosses.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 46–72.
Concerns especially composition with the preverbs ro-, fo-, to-, ind-/en.

Ind Fherta

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

indaas

3147.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Le complément du comparatif de superiorité en vieil-irlandais.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 167–177.
Discusses in particular the use of the independent dative, the preposition ol, and the phrases ol-daas, in-daas, a-daas to express the standard of comparison.

Indech

1775.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (84–93, 120–167).
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 230–262.
Continued from Éigse 19 (1982), pp. 1-35.

indeoin

10608.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The early Irish vocabulary of mills and milling.
In Studies on early Ireland [Duignan essays] (1982), pp. 13–19.
Edits a passage on the eight parts of a mill from the tract De ceithri slichtaib athgabála, beg. Im ocht mbullu ara-fognat muilenn (CIH ii 374.19-20, etc.); with English translation, textual notes and a vocabulary list.

ind-feith

7075.
Griffith (Aaron): Varia: I. 2. Notes on the Milan Glosses: 28c17 báinfeiti.
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 154–157.

indḟine

1423.
McLeod (Neil): Kinship.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 1–22.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] The gelḟine; [3.] The derbḟine; [4.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the íarfine; [5.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the indḟine; [6.] Reckoning kinship by hand; [7.] Summary of proposed model; [8.] Problems with MacNeill’s model; [9.] The problem of the sprightly great-grandfathers; [10.] The problem of the indeterminate gelḟine; [11.] Subsequent modifications to MacNeill’s model; [12.] Supporting evidence: incl. discussion of the relationship between íarmue ‘great-grandson’ and íarfine, and between indue ‘great-great-grandson’ and indḟine; [13.] Conclusion: the basis of the kinship system was the three-generation gelḟine. vs. E. MacNeill, Celtic Ireland, 1921 (Best2 2136); D. Binchy, in PBA 29 (1943), p. 223; T. Charles-Edwards, Early Irish and Welsh kinship (Oxford, 1993); N. Patterson, in BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Binchy (D.) (ref.), Charles-Edwards (T.) (ref.), MacNeill (E.) (ref.), Patterson (N.) (ref.)
3515.
Patterson (Nerys W.): Patrilineal kinship in early Irish society: the evidence from the Irish law texts.
In BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Discusses the terms for the various kinship relations, in particular derbḟine.
3247.
Baumgarten (Rolf): The kindred metaphors in Bechbretha and Coibnes usci thairidne.
In Peritia 4 (1985), pp. 307–327.
On the use of the analogy of the four categories of kinship (gelḟine, derbḟine, íarfine, indḟine) applied to three cases of neighbourhood law: I. Bechbretha §§9-11, 18-22; II. Bechbretha §§12-13; III. Coibnes uisci thairidne §§1-3, 8. With linguistic discussion and English translation.

Appendix: ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 10 (1973), p. 80 §11 [Aithgabál bech].

indilse dúaise

1834.
Watkins (Calvert): The etymology of Irish dúan.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 270–277.
Derives it from *dap-nā, cf. L damnum. Also on other terminology from the reciprocal context of encomiastic poetry.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 536-543.

indilsi nduais

1834.
Watkins (Calvert): The etymology of Irish dúan.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 270–277.
Derives it from *dap-nā, cf. L damnum. Also on other terminology from the reciprocal context of encomiastic poetry.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 536-543.

indoíni

622.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. Notae mediolanenses.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 205–207.
[1.] Ml. 49b7 (Refutes emendation of MS indoiss to indoíni (Thes. i, 151, n. e); proposes in[tóiss] doiss); [2.] Ml. 49c13 (Refutes emendation of MS inmodi to innidmoidi (Thes. i, 152); proposes inmo[í]di.

indoiss

622.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. Notae mediolanenses.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 205–207.
[1.] Ml. 49b7 (Refutes emendation of MS indoiss to indoíni (Thes. i, 151, n. e); proposes in[tóiss] doiss); [2.] Ml. 49c13 (Refutes emendation of MS inmodi to innidmoidi (Thes. i, 152); proposes inmo[í]di.

indra

3225.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Some words for `(man-made) ridge’ in Irish: fu(i)th(a)irbe; immaire; indra, indrad.
In BBCS 26/4 (May 1976), pp. 445–449.

indrad

3225.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Some words for `(man-made) ridge’ in Irish: fu(i)th(a)irbe; immaire; indra, indrad.
In BBCS 26/4 (May 1976), pp. 445–449.

indue

1423.
McLeod (Neil): Kinship.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 1–22.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] The gelḟine; [3.] The derbḟine; [4.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the íarfine; [5.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the indḟine; [6.] Reckoning kinship by hand; [7.] Summary of proposed model; [8.] Problems with MacNeill’s model; [9.] The problem of the sprightly great-grandfathers; [10.] The problem of the indeterminate gelḟine; [11.] Subsequent modifications to MacNeill’s model; [12.] Supporting evidence: incl. discussion of the relationship between íarmue ‘great-grandson’ and íarfine, and between indue ‘great-great-grandson’ and indḟine; [13.] Conclusion: the basis of the kinship system was the three-generation gelḟine. vs. E. MacNeill, Celtic Ireland, 1921 (Best2 2136); D. Binchy, in PBA 29 (1943), p. 223; T. Charles-Edwards, Early Irish and Welsh kinship (Oxford, 1993); N. Patterson, in BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Binchy (D.) (ref.), Charles-Edwards (T.) (ref.), MacNeill (E.) (ref.), Patterson (N.) (ref.)

íneán (ghost word)

2301.
Toner (Gregory): An eilimint *íneán i logainmneacha Reachlainne.
In Ainm 6 (1994), pp. 32–37.
ad D. Mac Giolla Easpaig, in Ainm 4 (1989–1990) pp. 3–89.

ined

764.
Hamp (Eric P.): Old Irish ed, id.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20–29.
Discusses the etym. of (I) OIr. ed ‘space, distance, interval, etc.' and related ined (later inad) ‘place, spot, position, etc.', and id ‘withe, fetter, etc.', all from basic PIE root *ped- ‘foot’; and argues against C. Marstrander (in BILL: 1471) that achad and machad are compounds of an s-stem with a second element *-edo- from the above-mentioned PIE root.

Revised by the author in ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74-75.
2707.
Hamp (Eric P.): Ad ZCP 34, 1975, 20 ff.
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74–75.
Revision of E. P. Hamp, Old Irish ed, id, in ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20-29.

infear

1855.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Roinnt focal iasachta sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 158–166.
1. beargún/beirgiún/biorgún; 2. béitín/béitíne; 3. meá/meadh/midh/meath; 4. infear; 5. stilliúr; 6. ainsiléad; 7. luaidhe; 8. spéir.

infeiti

7075.
Griffith (Aaron): Varia: I. 2. Notes on the Milan Glosses: 28c17 báinfeiti.
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 154–157.

in ·fét

784.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: III. 1. OIr. in ·fét, Welsh dywedwyt.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 158–159.

infimus orbis (Hib-Lat)

1935.
Carey (John): The Irish ‘otherworld’: Hiberno-Latin perspectives.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 154–159.
Hib-Lat. orbis used to convey meaning of OIr. síde, and validity of its English translation ‘otherworld’.

ing

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.

inge

8922.
Vries (Ranke de): Two early examples of the preposition acht followed by the accusative case outside the law texts and an example of acht inge.
In Ériu 60 (2010), pp. 137–144.
Examples extracted from De causis torchi Corc’ Óche.

inge acht

8922.
Vries (Ranke de): Two early examples of the preposition acht followed by the accusative case outside the law texts and an example of acht inge.
In Ériu 60 (2010), pp. 137–144.
Examples extracted from De causis torchi Corc’ Óche.

ingeán

2301.
Toner (Gregory): An eilimint *íneán i logainmneacha Reachlainne.
In Ainm 6 (1994), pp. 32–37.
ad D. Mac Giolla Easpaig, in Ainm 4 (1989–1990) pp. 3–89.

ingen ar méraib

3515.
Patterson (Nerys W.): Patrilineal kinship in early Irish society: the evidence from the Irish law texts.
In BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Discusses the terms for the various kinship relations, in particular derbḟine.

ingen moel

1442.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): The ingen moel.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 217–227.
Perhaps originally meant ‘servant girl’; cf. Mx inney / inneen-veyl ‘hand-maid, maid-servant’. Also on the use of maol, esp. with women’s names, e.g. Aoibheall mhaol and Gráinne Mhaol in ModIr verse.

ingen ‘nail’

2899.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia etymologica: 1. Welsh ffriw, ewin, tafod and labio-velars.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 461–466.
OIr. tengae, ingen, lugu, daig, snigid.

inghreim

1867.
Cunningham (Bernadette), Gillespie (Raymond): Persecution in seventeenth-century Irish.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 15–20.
Persecution as used beside and different from Ir. inghreim in religious texts in the Counter-Reformation period.

ingnas

4249.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 5. éagm(h)ais, iongnais.
In Ériu 39 (1988), p. 192.
ad T. F. O’Rahilly, in Ériu 13/2 (1942), pp. 188-190.

ingor

493.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): On the semantics of Irish words derived from IE *gher- ‘hot’.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 273–290.
[1.] fo-geir and guirid (goirid) in the Cambrai Homily and the Glosses; [2.] Legal contexts [gor, ingor, goire]; [3.] DIL's 1 gor; [4.] Further illustrative verbal citations; [5.] goirt, gortae, gortach, gortaigid and gortugud; [6.] grís and derivatives; [7.] Modern Irish evidence.

Inis Ane

3171.
Hamp (Eric P.): Ravenna Anas.
In ÉtC 34 (1998–2000), p. 55.

Inis Caín

1809.
Bieler (Ludwig): Two observations concerning the Navigatio Brendani.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 15–17.
1. On James Carney’s view of the dependence of Imram Maíle Dúin on the Navigatio Brendani, and on the ‘happy otherworld’ as a Menschheitsgedanke; 2. On the relationship between Insula Deliciosa, Inis Caín, and Inis Subai.

Republ. in The Otherworld voyage in early Irish literature, pp. 91-93.
Carney (James) (ref.)

Inis Choluim

6715.
Márkus (Gilbert): Tracing Emon: Insula Sancti Columbae de Emonia.
In IR 55/1 (Spring 2004), pp. 1–9.
On the origin and meaning of the name Emonia, older alternative for Inchcolm, Fife.

Inis Daimle

3361.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Inis Teimle, between Uí Chennselaig and the Déissi.
In Peritia 16 (2002), pp. 451–458.
Discusses the saints associated with this site, which is identified with Greatisland, Co. Wexford.

Inis Doimle

3361.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Inis Teimle, between Uí Chennselaig and the Déissi.
In Peritia 16 (2002), pp. 451–458.
Discusses the saints associated with this site, which is identified with Greatisland, Co. Wexford.

Inis Eóganáin

5999.
Murphy (John A.): M. J. O’Kelly.
In JCHAS 87 (1982), pp. 150–151.
5998.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Insovenach: a consideration.
In JCHAS 87 (1982), pp. 142–143.
Inis Eóganáin.

Inis Eoghain

14040.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Placenames and early settlement in County Donegal.
In Donegal history and society (1995), pp. 149–182.
Cinéal Eoghain and Inis Eoghain; Cinéal Conaill and Tír Chonaill; Cinéal Éanna and Tír Éanna; Cinéal Luighdheach and Tír Luighdheach; Cinéal Baghaine and Tír Baghaine; Tír Ainmhireach; Tír Aodha; Dún na nGall/Donegal; Early Christian settlement names [cluain; tulach]; Secular habitation sites as ecclesiastical sites [ráth]; Generic ecclesiastical settlement terms: domhnach; díseart; teach; cill.

Inis Ibdon

13110.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The original name of the Viking settlement at Limerick.
In Northern lights [Almqvist essays] (2001), pp. 165–177.
Argues that the name Inis Ibdon was used for the island at Limerick prior to the arrival of the Scandinavians.

Inis Labrainne

9789.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): To Chellóc mac Oíbléni: saint and places.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 258–267.
On the identification of four cult sites associated with Mo Chellóg: Inisvickillane, Ballinrannig, Inis Labrainne (now Inch in the parish of Ballinvoher) and Cell Mo Cheallóg (now Kilmakillogue).

Inis Maic Uchen

12319.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Inis Moccu Chéin.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn 1976), pp. 267–270.
Is identified with Raasay.

Inis Moccu Chéin

12319.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Inis Moccu Chéin.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn 1976), pp. 267–270.
Is identified with Raasay.

Inis na hEidnigi

6065.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Glaislinn and Inis na hEidnigi.
In JCHAS 109 (2004), pp. 111–118.
Discusses and identifies two Co. Cork place-names occurring in Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh (LL 39538-41).

Inis Oírr

1953.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): An tainm áite Inis Oírr.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 119–123.
Inis Oírr < Inis Oirthir, with detailed linguistic discussion.

Incl. 3 apps: A. On the Co. Clare version of the name; B. On the doubtful identification of Magh Saíre (in Lebor na Cert) with Inis Oírr; C. The oldest English names.

6629.
Ó Broin (Tomás): Inis Thiar: naming and misnaming.
In JGAHS 51 (1999), pp. 109–119.
On the original name of Inis Oírr, Co. Galway.

Inis Oirthir

6629.
Ó Broin (Tomás): Inis Thiar: naming and misnaming.
In JGAHS 51 (1999), pp. 109–119.
On the original name of Inis Oírr, Co. Galway.

Inis Salutóiris

6724.
Breeze (Andrew): Where were Middle Gaelic Glenn na Leóman and Inis Salutóiris?
In IR 58/1 (May 2007), pp. 101–106.

Inis Subai

1809.
Bieler (Ludwig): Two observations concerning the Navigatio Brendani.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 15–17.
1. On James Carney’s view of the dependence of Imram Maíle Dúin on the Navigatio Brendani, and on the ‘happy otherworld’ as a Menschheitsgedanke; 2. On the relationship between Insula Deliciosa, Inis Caín, and Inis Subai.

Republ. in The Otherworld voyage in early Irish literature, pp. 91-93.
Carney (James) (ref.)

Inis Teimle

3361.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Inis Teimle, between Uí Chennselaig and the Déissi.
In Peritia 16 (2002), pp. 451–458.
Discusses the saints associated with this site, which is identified with Greatisland, Co. Wexford.

Inis Thiar

6629.
Ó Broin (Tomás): Inis Thiar: naming and misnaming.
In JGAHS 51 (1999), pp. 109–119.
On the original name of Inis Oírr, Co. Galway.

Inis Treabhair

7484.
Ó Conghaile (Mícheál): Inis Treabhair: logainmneacha.
In IMN (1985), pp. 110–113.
Inishtravin, Co. Galway.

Inish Oirthir

1953.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): An tainm áite Inis Oírr.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 119–123.
Inis Oírr < Inis Oirthir, with detailed linguistic discussion.

Incl. 3 apps: A. On the Co. Clare version of the name; B. On the doubtful identification of Magh Saíre (in Lebor na Cert) with Inis Oírr; C. The oldest English names.

Inishargy

8691.
Flanagan (Deirdre): Three settlement names in County Down: the Turtars of Inishargy; Dunsfort; Tollumgrange.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 65–71.

Inisharrye

1953.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): An tainm áite Inis Oírr.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 119–123.
Inis Oírr < Inis Oirthir, with detailed linguistic discussion.

Incl. 3 apps: A. On the Co. Clare version of the name; B. On the doubtful identification of Magh Saíre (in Lebor na Cert) with Inis Oírr; C. The oldest English names.

Inisheer (Engl)

1953.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): An tainm áite Inis Oírr.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 119–123.
Inis Oírr < Inis Oirthir, with detailed linguistic discussion.

Incl. 3 apps: A. On the Co. Clare version of the name; B. On the doubtful identification of Magh Saíre (in Lebor na Cert) with Inis Oírr; C. The oldest English names.

Inisheraght

1953.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): An tainm áite Inis Oírr.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 119–123.
Inis Oírr < Inis Oirthir, with detailed linguistic discussion.

Incl. 3 apps: A. On the Co. Clare version of the name; B. On the doubtful identification of Magh Saíre (in Lebor na Cert) with Inis Oírr; C. The oldest English names.

Inishery

1953.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): An tainm áite Inis Oírr.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 119–123.
Inis Oírr < Inis Oirthir, with detailed linguistic discussion.

Incl. 3 apps: A. On the Co. Clare version of the name; B. On the doubtful identification of Magh Saíre (in Lebor na Cert) with Inis Oírr; C. The oldest English names.

Inisvickillane

9789.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): To Chellóc mac Oíbléni: saint and places.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 258–267.
On the identification of four cult sites associated with Mo Chellóg: Inisvickillane, Ballinrannig, Inis Labrainne (now Inch in the parish of Ballinvoher) and Cell Mo Cheallóg (now Kilmakillogue).

inmodi

622.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. Notae mediolanenses.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 205–207.
[1.] Ml. 49b7 (Refutes emendation of MS indoiss to indoíni (Thes. i, 151, n. e); proposes in[tóiss] doiss); [2.] Ml. 49c13 (Refutes emendation of MS inmodi to innidmoidi (Thes. i, 152); proposes inmo[í]di.

inmo[í]di

622.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. Notae mediolanenses.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 205–207.
[1.] Ml. 49b7 (Refutes emendation of MS indoiss to indoíni (Thes. i, 151, n. e); proposes in[tóiss] doiss); [2.] Ml. 49c13 (Refutes emendation of MS inmodi to innidmoidi (Thes. i, 152); proposes inmo[í]di.

innatrachtadaib (innatrachtaib)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

innatrachtaib (innatrachtadaib)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

innber

8533.
Kelly (Fergus): Cauldron imagery in a legal passage on judges (CIH IV 1307.38-1308.7).
In Celtica 26 (2010), pp. 31–43.
From Egerton 88; edition, with English translation and linguistic discussion (particulary of the terms tellach, grísach, æal, drolam, innber).

inne

223.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Old Irish inne.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 155–156.
Derives from *en-n-iyā ‘the interior’ from a possible pre-Celtic adjective *en-no- ‘inner, interior’, from preposition *en ‘in’ + adjectival suffix *-no-.
341.
Breatnach (Liam): On abstract nouns from prepositions in Irish.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 18–19.
Argues that inne, echtrae, aire, íarmae (íarsma) are all -stems.
16890.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): The expression of “sense, meaning, signification” in the Old Irish glosses, and particularly in the Milan and Saint Gall glosses.
In Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg (2016), pp. 85–100.
Discusses the use and meaning of OIr. terms for semantic concepts, such as séis, sians/séns, intliucht, cíall, and inne.

inneoin

1707.
Williams (N. J. A.): Leagan cainte in Párliament na mban.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), p. 330.
vs. B. Ó Cuív, Párliament na mBan (Dublin 1952), 146; dar an eóruinn (l. 2357) ‘by the anvil’ (i.e. ‘by St. Patrick’s anvil’); eóruinn < inneoir < inneoin ‘anvil’.
Ó Cuív (B.) (ref.)

inneoin (in place names)

15240.
Finnegan (Aengus): An logainm Whinning, Co. na hIarmhí, agus ‘inneoin’ mar eilimint i logainmneacha.
In Éigse 39 (2016), pp. 187–198.

inneoir

1707.
Williams (N. J. A.): Leagan cainte in Párliament na mban.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), p. 330.
vs. B. Ó Cuív, Párliament na mBan (Dublin 1952), 146; dar an eóruinn (l. 2357) ‘by the anvil’ (i.e. ‘by St. Patrick’s anvil’); eóruinn < inneoir < inneoin ‘anvil’.
Ó Cuív (B.) (ref.)

inney / inneen-veyl (Mx)

1442.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): The ingen moel.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 217–227.
Perhaps originally meant ‘servant girl’; cf. Mx inney / inneen-veyl ‘hand-maid, maid-servant’. Also on the use of maol, esp. with women’s names, e.g. Aoibheall mhaol and Gráinne Mhaol in ModIr verse.

innidmoidi

622.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. Notae mediolanenses.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 205–207.
[1.] Ml. 49b7 (Refutes emendation of MS indoiss to indoíni (Thes. i, 151, n. e); proposes in[tóiss] doiss); [2.] Ml. 49c13 (Refutes emendation of MS inmodi to innidmoidi (Thes. i, 152); proposes inmo[í]di.

innis (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

inn-uraid

703.
McCone (Kim): The dative singular of Old Irish consonant stems.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 26–38.
Derives ‘short’ dative forms from an early apocope of locative *-i, thus arguing against the ‘IE endingless locative’ hypothesis suggested by R. Thurneysen (GOI §315). Also discusses relevance of inn-uraid ‘last year’.
Thurneysen (Rudolf) (ref.)

innuraid

11967.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): The Indo-European year.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 414–495.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms blíadain, ónn uraid (MIr. innuraid), gaim, gem, gam, gaimred, errach, sam, samrad, fog(a)mar, feis, gamuin, fannall, samaisc, eórna.

in ·od-tég-

3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.

insae

1181.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Discourse markers in medieval Irish texts: cs̄, cair, nı̄, and similar features.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 1–37.
1. Functional identity of cs̄, ces, cesc, and cair; 2. Origin of cair and ces; 3. ce(a)sc; 4. ní insae, ní ansae, ní hannsa; n’insae; 5. Translation, lento style, stylistic variation; 6. ce(a)st, ceist; 7. Conclusions. Incl. index of texts referred to.

ins(a)e

3334.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 9. asse.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 281–282.
asse < *ad-sād-s-io- (*sād- = W hawdd); anse < *n̥-sād-s-io-.

insce

8006.
Mac Aongusa (Máire): Seachta frisa toimsiter Gaedhelg: seven things by which Gaedhelg is measured.
In SCF 5 (2008), pp. 54–63.
Discusses the terms fid, deach, réim, forbaid, alt, insce and etargaire as they appear in the Book of Ballymote version of Auraicept na n-éces.

Inse Catt

1356.
Lockwood (W. B.): Remarks on Ir. Inse Orc, Inse Catt.
In SGS 21 (2003), pp. 247–249.
Criticises the traditional Celtic etymologies of these place-names.
8628.
Lockwood (W. B.): On the early history and origin of the names Orkney and Shetland.
In Namn och bygd 68 (1980), pp. 19–35.

Inse Fhearann na gCléireach

12152.
Nic Gearailt (Anselm): Logainmneacha ó Chiarraí Theas.
In Kerry magazine 2 (1990), p. 10.
Records place names from the townland of Inse Fhearann na gCléireach (Inchfarrannagleragh), Co. Kerry.
12154.
Nic Gearailt (Anselm): Tuilleadh logainmneacha ó Chiarraí Theas.
In Kerry magazine 3 (1991), p. 23.
Additional place names from Inse Fhearann na gCléireach, Co. Kerry.

Inse Orc

1356.
Lockwood (W. B.): Remarks on Ir. Inse Orc, Inse Catt.
In SGS 21 (2003), pp. 247–249.
Criticises the traditional Celtic etymologies of these place-names.
8628.
Lockwood (W. B.): On the early history and origin of the names Orkney and Shetland.
In Namn och bygd 68 (1980), pp. 19–35.

Inse Shan Labhráis

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Insovenach

5998.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Insovenach: a consideration.
In JCHAS 87 (1982), pp. 142–143.
Inis Eóganáin.

Institut für Lautforschung an die Berliner Universität

2143.
Rockel (Martin): Die irischprachigen Schallplatten im Lautarchiv der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 241–249.
History of the collection and details on its current holdings, today housed in the Berliner Lautarchiv of the Musikwissenschaftlichen Seminar der Humboldt-Universität.

Insula Deliciosa

1809.
Bieler (Ludwig): Two observations concerning the Navigatio Brendani.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 15–17.
1. On James Carney’s view of the dependence of Imram Maíle Dúin on the Navigatio Brendani, and on the ‘happy otherworld’ as a Menschheitsgedanke; 2. On the relationship between Insula Deliciosa, Inis Caín, and Inis Subai.

Republ. in The Otherworld voyage in early Irish literature, pp. 91-93.
Carney (James) (ref.)

Insula Fortium (Lat)

1219.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Varia: III. 1. Insula Fortium: Ynys y Kedeirn/Kedyrn.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 273–274.
On the possible connection between W Ynys y Kedeirn/Kedyrn in the story of Branwen uerch Lyr and Lat Insula Fortium in the Navigatio Brendani.

intliucht

16890.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): The expression of “sense, meaning, signification” in the Old Irish glosses, and particularly in the Milan and Saint Gall glosses.
In Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg (2016), pp. 85–100.
Discusses the use and meaning of OIr. terms for semantic concepts, such as séis, sians/séns, intliucht, cíall, and inne.

in[tóiss] doiss

622.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. Notae mediolanenses.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 205–207.
[1.] Ml. 49b7 (Refutes emendation of MS indoiss to indoíni (Thes. i, 151, n. e); proposes in[tóiss] doiss); [2.] Ml. 49c13 (Refutes emendation of MS inmodi to innidmoidi (Thes. i, 152); proposes inmo[í]di.

intotgat

3299.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 8. Some compounds of téit.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 175–177.
1. for ·tét ‘helps’; 2. im(b) ·tét ‘goes about, sets forth’; 3. frith ·to-tég, fristait ·frittáit ‘opposes’; 4. in ·od-tég- 3 pl. intotgat ‘enter’; 5. The inherited inventory; 6. imb ·said- v. n. impuide ‘besiege’; 7. sechmo ·ella ‘passes by, lacks’.

Inverbervie

7963.
King (Jacob): Haberberui: an aberration?
In JSNS 3 (2009), pp. 127–134.
Older form of the place name Inverbervie, Aberdeenshire.

Inverennok

6704.
Barrow (G. W. S.): The ferry of Inverennok.
In IR 52/1 (Spring 2001), pp. 101–104.

Inveruisk

6348.
Egan (Bartholomew): Dún Mhuire, Killiney, Co. Dublin.
In DHR 25/2 (Mar. 1972), pp. 75–76.
Formerly known as ‘Inveruisk’ (Ir. Inbhear Iascaigh).

in·túaisi

7024.
Niepokuj (Mary): Requests for a hearing in Norse and in other Indo-European languages.
In JIES 25/1-2 (Spring/Summer 1997), pp. 49–78.
Discusses formulaic expressions with éitsid ‘hear ye’ in early Irish verse.

iodhlann (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

Iōhănnes (Lat)

835.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 1. Ir. Eóin, Sc. G. Iain.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 193–195.
From Lat. Iōhănnes.

iolann (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

Iolaraigh (ScG)

4455.
Fraser (Ian): The place-names of Illeray.
In ScS 17 (1973), pp. 155–161.

iomarcaidh

2679.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 8. The metrical fault called iomarcaidh.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 163–165.

iomna

549.
Ward (Alan): Varia: II. ‘Will’ and ‘testament’ in Irish.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 183–185.
Discusses the semantics and etymology of iomna, tiomna, udhacht; iomna, tiomna = ‘injunction, decreee’ > ‘mandatory will; udhacht = ‘declaration, statement of fact or desire’ > ‘will’ in general sense of ‘dying statement’.
3251.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 3. iomna and udhacht.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 153–154.
ad A. Ward, in Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 183-185.

ioná

13868.
McManus (Damian): Varia: II. Classical Irish miscellanea 2. Omission of ioná ‘than’.
In Ériu 64 (2014), pp. 222–227.

ionad (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

ionga

12342.
Mag Eacháin (Conchúr): Téarmaí duáin.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 188–198.
1. friofac / ruthag / ruaibh(r)ic, srl.; 2. craobhóg; 3. crúca; 4. fiochrán; 5. fioradh an duáin; 6. freithiún; 7. frídín, fríde; 8. frithionga; 9. friochan; 10. gob an duáin; 11. ionga; 12. luiseag; 13. lusa; 14. slip; 15. súil; 16. teanga.

iongantach

1565.
McGonagle (Noel): Three Ulster features.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
1. Lenition after iongantach [and millteanach]; 2. i bhfus: On the development from adverb to quaisi-imperative: 'here’ > 'give me’; 3. Tá mé ina shuidhe: On the generalisation of 3rd masc. poss. in ina shuidhe, ina sheasamh, etc. in Ulster and Man.
1692.
McGonagle (Noel): On the qualitative adjective.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 105–108.
ad N. McGonagle, in Éigse 16/3 (1976), pp. 215-217. Focuses on the use of qualitative adjectives (e.g. iongantach) following plural nouns.

iongnais

4249.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 5. éagm(h)ais, iongnais.
In Ériu 39 (1988), p. 192.
ad T. F. O’Rahilly, in Ériu 13/2 (1942), pp. 188-190.

ionsair (ionsar)

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

iora

363.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail: I.
In Celtica 16 (1984), p. 34.
1. faopach (< fadhb(h)thach); 2. *lora (lora ‘a squirrel’ in DIL derives from a misprint of iora).

iora ruadh

18334.
Hamp (Eric P.): On Indo-European nouns in e-reduplication.
In IF 77 (1972), pp. 159–170.
§3. Old Irish fuil and feóil; §6. The word for the squirrel vel sim [Ir. iora ruadh, ScG feòrag].

iorram (ScG)

10894.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): On the possible origins of Scottish Gaelic iorram ‘rowing song’.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 2 (2006), pp. 232–288.

Iorras

8693.
Mhac an Fhailigh (Éamonn): Some Erris placenames: pronunciation.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 86–91.

Iorras Aithneach

1213.
Ó Curnáin (Brian): Draíocht uimhreacha: anailís shóinseálach ar dheilbhíocht iolra an ainmfhocail i gcanúint Iorras Aithneach.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 161–204.
A quantitative variable analysis of the nominal plural in the Irish of Iorras Aithneach; relevance of social networks discussed: -cha(í), -a(í), extension in (t)r.

Íosa

1482.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta [I].
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 207–214.
[1.] Focail áirithe i gcomhardadh (é, í, mac, Íosa, Críost); [2.] Bá. Part II in Éigse 14/4 (1972), pp. 265-68; part III in Éigse 15/2 (1973), pp. 89-92.

íosann

1726.
McGonagle (Noel): The pres. fut. stem of the irregular verb.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), pp. 537–544.
[1.] béarann; [2.] bhéarann; [3.] déarann; [4.] g(h)eobhann, fuigheann; [5.] íosann; [6.] tiocann; [7.] rachann; [8.] tchífeann; [9.] dhéanann; [10.] béann.

Iphín (Pín)

1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.

-ír

2607.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Gaulois IEVRV: irlandais (ro)-ír “dicauit” .
In ZCP 37 (1979), pp. 207–213.
In the light of Gallo-Greek ειωρου (preferred to Gallo-Latin ieuru), derives OIr. pret. -ír < *iyor- < *eyor- < *pepor-, and argues that ernaid and renaid are both < PIE * per- but differentiated by an enlargement -h3- and -h1-, respectively.
3637.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Gaulish ieuru and Old Irish ír.
In StC 26–27 (1991–1992), pp. 7–8.
3660.
Isaac (G. R.): Two continental Celtic verbs.
In StC 31 (1997), pp. 161–171.
1. Ieuru.

ires(s)

3208.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [4.] eirioes.
In BBCS 25/4 (May 1974), p. 392.
On the etym. of OIr. ires(s).

iris

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

íriu

11309.
Koch (John T.): Celts, Britons and Gaels: names, peoples and identities.
In THSC-NS 9 (2003), pp. 41–56.
14053.
Delamarre (Xavier): Iria (*Īryā) «l’opulente, la fertile» (Ligurie, Galice, Dalmatie).
In Veleia 26 (2009), pp. 355–358.
Compared to OIr. íriu, Ériu.

iroin

6925.
Meyer (Robert T.): Old Irish rhetorical terms in the Milan glosses.
In Word 28/1-2 (1976), pp. 110–116.
1. bestindrim; 2. dolbud; 3. ecosc; 4. figair, fiugar; 5. fuath; 6. iroin; 7. metaforde, metaforecde; 8. sciam; 9. trop; 10. tropdae; 11. tropdaid.

irt

8933.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Further to the drink of death.
In Éigse 37 (2010), pp. 134–141.
On lathirt (Corm. LB 27.8-9). Proposes that in this version of ‘Cormac’s glossary’ the lemma was reinterpreted as either ‘milk of death’ (laith irt) or ‘death of a warrior’ (láithirt).

Irvine

13794.
Breeze (Andrew): Scottish place-names: the way ahead.
In Doonsin’ emerauds (2004), pp. 18–23.
Discusses the following Scottish place-names: 1. Noss Head, Piltanton Burn, Bennachie, and Dunscanby Head; 2. Arran, Cumnock, Girvan, and Irvine; 3. Loquhariot; 4. Pennango and Soutra.

is

3173.
Kortlandt (Frederik): Three notes on the Old Irish verb: 2. níta, ‘am not, is not’.
In ÉtC 34 (1998–2000), pp. 144–145.

is (agus) (= Engl. and)

376.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Agus (is)/and: a shared syntactic feature.
In Celtica 16 (1984), pp. 125–137.
As followed by (1) a nominative absolute type of construction, (2) a verbal-noun / infinitive type of construction.

is amlaid

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.

is and

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.
865.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 3. The transparency of *Heen(+ i).
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 180–181.
*Heen ‘therein, thereat’: iN ‘in which’ without surface relative, and its relation to anticipatory use of and / ann in sentences beginning is and / ann.

is ann

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.
865.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 3. The transparency of *Heen(+ i).
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 180–181.
*Heen ‘therein, thereat’: iN ‘in which’ without surface relative, and its relation to anticipatory use of and / ann in sentences beginning is and / ann.

is ar éigin

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.

is cet duit

357.
Quin (E. G.): Three notes: 1. A semantic ambivalence.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 140–141.
On the ambiguity of Hib-Engl. ‘to be entitled to’ and ‘to have a right to’ (refers also to Ir ceart and is cet duit.

is (conj.)

1510.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta III.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh 1973), pp. 89–92.
[1.] Ógláchas ar Chasbhairdne; [2.] is (copail, is (cónasc)). Part [I] in Éigse 14/3 (1972), pp. 207-14; part II in Éigse 14/4 (1972), pp. 265-68.

is (cop.)

1510.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta III.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh 1973), pp. 89–92.
[1.] Ógláchas ar Chasbhairdne; [2.] is (copail, is (cónasc)). Part [I] in Éigse 14/3 (1972), pp. 207-14; part II in Éigse 14/4 (1972), pp. 265-68.

is e a tha bho … (ScG)

765.
Greene (David): A recent semantic shift in Insular Celtic.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 43–59.
Discusses the semantic change (need >) lack > desire in (II) Irish (díth, dígbál (> mod. díobháil), feidhm, do-esta (> mod. teastuighidh), atá …ó, oireann …do, (III) Manx (laccal, feme), and (IV) Scottish Gaelic (tha …a dhìth air …, is e a tha bho …).

is ed mod

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.

is íat (iat)

1530.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): The reviser of Leabhar na hUidhre.
In Éigse 15/4 (Geimhreadh 1974), pp. 277–288.
Reviser of LU dated on linguistic grounds to first half of 12th century; identifies Máel Muri (mac Ceileachair mac meic Cuind na mbocht) (ob. 1106) as the reviser. Incl discussion of [1.] The development it é > is íat (iat); [2.] Infixed and independent pronouns; [3.] The probationes pennae.

-is (in place names)

2278.
Ó Máille (T. S.): Irish place-names in -as, -es, -is, -os, -us.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 125–143.

is ing

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.

is lú orm

1490.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 14/4 (Geimhreadh 1972), pp. 275–282.
1. cómhrac i dtóin [and gáir faoi tholl]; 2. fochraí (an) lae [< fochroíb; cf. also forcraid, fortraid; for variation in similar clusters, cf. M. A. O’Brien, in Celtica 2/2 (1954), p. 353]; 3. feiste [‘entertainment’; feist, eisteas, feisteas; 4. crioslach [crioslaí pl.]; 5. seir; 6. paidir chapaill; 7. púirín; 8. is () luar liom [luar < lú orm]; 9. tɑ: tu: tau [togha].
O’Brien (M. A.) (ref.)

is marb

2814.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Ir. ba marb, W. bu farw ‘he died’.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 469–481.
Discusses the idiomatic use of copula + marb ‘to die’ (as oppposed to the stative use of copula + predicative marb ‘he is dead’) and argues that it occurs in tenses other than the preterite, except in case of omission of the copula, where the idiom is confined to the past tense. Includes a collection of examples and a brief account of its substitution by competing idioms such as téit bás, téit éc, fuair bás.

is (ní) luar liom

1490.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 14/4 (Geimhreadh 1972), pp. 275–282.
1. cómhrac i dtóin [and gáir faoi tholl]; 2. fochraí (an) lae [< fochroíb; cf. also forcraid, fortraid; for variation in similar clusters, cf. M. A. O’Brien, in Celtica 2/2 (1954), p. 353]; 3. feiste [‘entertainment’; feist, eisteas, feisteas; 4. crioslach [crioslaí pl.]; 5. seir; 6. paidir chapaill; 7. púirín; 8. is () luar liom [luar < lú orm]; 9. tɑ: tu: tau [togha].
O’Brien (M. A.) (ref.)

is obair

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.

is tabarta i n-éslis

773.
Melia (Daniel F.): A note on translation.
In ZCP 35 (1976), pp. 172–174.
Interpretation of phrase is tabarta i n-éslis in tale Orgain Denna Ríg (as ed. by D. Greene 1955 [= BILL 5065]) p. 18, ll. 317-318.

isara fia dom

4603.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): A theological note on an Old Irish gloss on verse 13 of Psalm 49.
In ZCP 56 (2008), pp. 68–70.
Argues that the gloss (Thes. I, 3.9; Palatine No. 68) is incongruous with the verse because the glossator did not understand its meaning.

isara fie dúnn

2870.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On a possible Indo-Celtic etymological correspondence.
In ZCP 54 (2004), pp. 133–143.
Discusses the expression isara fie dúnn (Wb. 25c9), and argues it contains the 3rd sg. rel. of the future of ar-icc.

Island- (in place names)

2283.
Ó Mainnín (Mícheál B.): The element island in Ulster place-names.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 200–210.

isoc (Gaulish)

480.
Eska (Joseph F.): The deictic pronominal *ḱey in Celtic.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 153–155.
1. Old Irish ; 2. Gaulish duci; 3. Ogham koi and a Gaulish ghost form; 4. Gaulish isoc; 5. Middle Cornish keth.

ist (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

-iste (verbal adjective)

728.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): The verbal adjective formant -iste in Ulster Irish.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 39–45.
Suggests development -ighte > -ite > -itse > -iste for Ulster Irish and Scottish Gaelic.

isteal

1936.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 160–164.
1. *airmnecht; 2. crioslach; 3. daorach; 4. fabhairne; 5. fearacht; 6. imirt; 7. isteal; 8. praistéal.

it é

1530.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): The reviser of Leabhar na hUidhre.
In Éigse 15/4 (Geimhreadh 1974), pp. 277–288.
Reviser of LU dated on linguistic grounds to first half of 12th century; identifies Máel Muri (mac Ceileachair mac meic Cuind na mbocht) (ob. 1106) as the reviser. Incl discussion of [1.] The development it é > is íat (iat); [2.] Infixed and independent pronouns; [3.] The probationes pennae.

ith

1575.
McGonagle (Noel): The present tense flexionless termination.
In Éigse 16/4 (Geimhreadh 1976), pp. 275–283.
beir, bheir, cluin, ghní, deir, gheibh, tchí, ith, t(h)ig, t(h)éigh / t(h)éid.
12657.
Matasović (Ranko): Some Celto-Slavic etymologies.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 3 (2010), pp. 15–20.
Examines the exclusive Celto-Slavic lexical isoglosses in EDPC (1. PC *ēskyo- ‘moon’ [OIr. éscae, ésca, éisce]; 2. PC *fitu- ‘food’ [OIr. ith]; 3. PC *lūtu- ‘anger, power’ [OIr. lúth]; 4. PC *ruxtu- ‘noise’ [MIr. rucht]; 5. PC *slowgo- ‘troop, army’ [OIr. slúag, slóg]; 6. PC *talskV- ‘fragment, piece’ [cf. OIr. tailm]; 7. PC *krissu- ‘belt’ [OIr. cris]; 8. PC *kat-yo- ‘throw’ [OIr. caithid]), and proposes some new etymologies (1. PC *obnu ‘fear’ [OIr. omun]; 2. PC *frāno- ‘mane’ [ModIr. rón]; 3. PC *gissā- ‘taboo, prohibition’ [MIr. geis]; 4. PC *wesnālā- ‘swallow’ [OIr. fannall]).
16003.
Widmer (Paul): Das Korn des weiten Feldes. Interne Derivation, derivationskette und Flexionsklassenhierarchie: Aspekte der nominalen Wortbildung im Urindogermanischen.
IBS, 111. Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2004. 239 pp.
Rev. by
G. R. Isaac, in JCeltL 10 (2006), pp. 143-144.
Thomas Lindner, in Kratylos 55 (2010), pp. 167-170.
Karin Stüber, in StC 41 (2007), pp. 252-254.

Íth

11309.
Koch (John T.): Celts, Britons and Gaels: names, peoples and identities.
In THSC-NS 9 (2003), pp. 41–56.

ithid

1129.
McCone (Kim): OIr. -ic ‘reaches’, ithid ‘eats’, rigid ‘stretches’ and the PIE ‘Narten’ present in Celtic.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 1–11.
1265.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. Old Irish ithid.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 191–194.
1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.
11953.
Sandell (Ryan): Evidence for Indo-European acrostatic presents in Old Irish?
In PHCC 31 (2012), pp. 282–304.

iubhar

18003.
Schrijver (Peter): The meaning of Celtic *eburos.
In Mélanges Lambert (2015), pp. 65–76.
Etym. of OIr. ibar.

iúch

1251.
Ua Súilleabháin (Seán): Glac bheag focal.
In Éigse 33 (2002), pp. 173–178.
1. airchisín (Pluincéad); 2. miúndáil/meanndáil/miondáil; 3. aillbhil (Pluincéad); 4. ghiúch/giúch/iúch/ (?) dhiúch/ (?) diúch; 5. creithinisí/cleathainisí/greathainisí, creathnais.

iúil

1737.
Breatnach (R. A.): Roinnt focal Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 99–110.
[1] Glórshúil ; [2] Cuirim in iúl ; [3] Barróg; [4] Fínné ; [5] Césmuite.

Add. & corr. in Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 308.

iúl

1737.
Breatnach (R. A.): Roinnt focal Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 99–110.
[1] Glórshúil ; [2] Cuirim in iúl ; [3] Barróg; [4] Fínné ; [5] Césmuite.

Add. & corr. in Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 308.

ius (Lat)

1387.
Davies (Wendy): Clerics as rulers: some implications of the terminology of ecclesiastical authority in early medieval Ireland.
In Latin and the vernacular in early medieval Britain (1982), pp. 81–97.
Discusses implications of the use of certain words in sixth-, seventh- and early eighth-century Ireland, e.g. Lat. princeps, principatus, census, ius, regnum and Ir. toísigecht [sic leg.], flaith, flaithem, flaithemnacht, airchinnech, etc.

iūstus (Lat)

1445.
Willi (Andreas): Varia: III. Old Irish (h)uisse ‘just, right, fitting’.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 235–240.
Argues that OIr. (h)uisse is not related to L iūstus ‘j{u}st’ but that it originated as a past participle in the factitive (or causative) verbal paradigm of the root *Hi̯eudh-, possibly related to imperative forms uind-se, uinn-si ‘look, behold, etc.'.

i-verbs

693.
Penney (J. H. W.): Varia: III. Weak and strong i-verbs in Old Irish.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 149–154.

·ic

11953.
Sandell (Ryan): Evidence for Indo-European acrostatic presents in Old Irish?
In PHCC 31 (2012), pp. 282–304.