Words and Proper Names

h-

1214.
Schrijver (Peter): On the nature and origin of word-initial h- in the Würzburg glosses.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 205–227.
1. Introduction; 2. The Würzburg Glosses: material; 3.Evaluation: The status of h-; 4. The origins of h-; 5. The Ogam letter húath; 6. Counter-evidence: athir; 7. Conclusions. Concludes that OIr. h- of composite origin is phonemic rather than orthographic in many instances.

*-h

1413.
Garrett (Andrew): On the prosodic phonology of Ogam Irish.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 139–160.
Three stages in PrimIr. apocope: 1. apocope affects word-final short front vowels (final *-n lost before *-h); 2. apocope occurs at end of phonological phrases; 3. generalisation of phrase-final apocope. Some discussion of initial mutations.

h (h + vowel)

1480.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): Réamhanálú guta mar chlaochlú tús focail.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 169–178.
1. Réamhrá; 2. Séimhiú agus urú; 3. t roimh s; 4. t roimh ghuta; 5. h roimh ghuta; 6. Stair an h roimh ghuta; 7. Conclúd.

ha (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

Haberberui

7963.
King (Jacob): Haberberui: an aberration?
In JSNS 3 (2009), pp. 127–134.
Older form of the place name Inverbervie, Aberdeenshire.

habitaculum (Lat)

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

halmadóir

218.
de Bhaldraithe (T.): Palmaire agus focail eile.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 76–81.
1. palmaire/falmaire/falmaireacht; 2. fámaire/fámaireacht; 3. palmaire/falmaire; 4. falmadóir/halmadóir; 5. failm/ailm; 6. pailméar; 7. pám; 8. tailm/sailm/failm.

hazels of Segais

778.
Breatnach (Liam): The Caldron of Poesy.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 45–93.
Ed. with diplomatic and restored texts (incl. glosses on text) on the three cauldrons of poesy, Coire Goiriath, Coire Érmai, Coire Soḟis from MS TCD H 3. 18 with Engl. transl. and notes. Begins with Moí coire coir Goiriath. Discussion of linguistic dating and metrics. Includes index of names and principal notes. Appendix with ed. of text on the hazels of Segais (cuill na Segsa) from MS NLI G 10.

Add. et corr. in Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 189-191.

Heapstown

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Hearth Money Act (1662)

1522.
Harrison (Alan): Lucht na simléirí.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), pp. 189–202.
Satirical text, derivative of Pairlement Chloinne Tomáis, containing prose and poetry (a crosánacht ?), directed against the Hearth Money Act of 1662. Edited from MSS TCD H 5.9, H 2. 6, RIA 23 K 24, RIA 23 O 79; perhaps composed by Roibeard Nuinsionn. Contains two poems beg. Ceist agam ort, a Shéamuis and Ní dual simeléar ag síol Lóbuis. Includes a glossary and indexes of proper names.

heat

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

*Heen

865.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 3. The transparency of *Heen(+ i).
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 180–181.
*Heen ‘therein, thereat’: iN ‘in which’ without surface relative, and its relation to anticipatory use of and / ann in sentences beginning is and / ann.

hé-hé (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

Helisęus

1642.
Dumville (David): Late-seventh or eighth-century evidence for the British transmission of Pelagius.
In CMCS 10 (Winter 1985), pp. 39–52.
Ed. of scribal colophon on Pelagius’s Commentary on the Pauline Epistles from MSS Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, lat. 9530 and Salisbury, Cathedral Library, 5; with Engl transl. Suggests that the text was copied in Wales. Discusses the names Helisęus, Merianus and Salamonis.

Hentre

5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.

herimum (Lat)

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

Herodius

1050.
McNamara (Martin): The bird hiruath of the Ever-New Tongue and hirodius of gloss on Ps. 103:17 in Vatican Codex Pal. Lat. 68.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 87–97.
ad P. Kitson, in Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 113-136.
Kitson (P.) (ref.)

> rg (unstressed)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

*Hi̯eudh-

1445.
Willi (Andreas): Varia: III. Old Irish (h)uisse ‘just, right, fitting’.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 235–240.
Argues that OIr. (h)uisse is not related to L iūstus ‘j{u}st’ but that it originated as a past participle in the factitive (or causative) verbal paradigm of the root *Hi̯eudh-, possibly related to imperative forms uind-se, uinn-si ‘look, behold, etc.'.

Hinba

12073.
Sayers (William): Spiritual navigation in the Western Sea: Sturlunga saga and Adomnán’s Hinba.
In ScI 44 (1993), pp. 30–42.
Suggests an equation of ON Hirtir with the place name Hinba, interpreted as a penitential colony and identified with Colonsay.
16567.
Lamont (W. D.): Where is Adamnán’s Hinba?
In WHNQ 7 (Jun. 1978), pp. 3–6.
Addendum in WHNQ 12 (1980), pp. 10-15.

Suggests Hinba is the island of Gunna between Coll and Tiree in the Inner Hebrides.
16571.
MacKay (William R.): Hinba again.
In WHNQ 9 (Jan. 1979), pp. 8–17.
vs. W. D. Lamont, in WHNQ 7 (1978), pp. 3-6.

Hiort

12073.
Sayers (William): Spiritual navigation in the Western Sea: Sturlunga saga and Adomnán’s Hinba.
In ScI 44 (1993), pp. 30–42.
Suggests an equation of ON Hirtir with the place name Hinba, interpreted as a penitential colony and identified with Colonsay.

hirlas (W)

1227.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Ir. buaball, W bual ‘drinking horn’.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 81–93.
Some discussion of ad(h)arc, corn, bleide, coppán, hirlas (W).

Hirta

12073.
Sayers (William): Spiritual navigation in the Western Sea: Sturlunga saga and Adomnán’s Hinba.
In ScI 44 (1993), pp. 30–42.
Suggests an equation of ON Hirtir with the place name Hinba, interpreted as a penitential colony and identified with Colonsay.

hiruath

829.
Kitson (Peter): The jewels and bird hiruath of the Ever-New Tongue.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 113–136.
1050.
McNamara (Martin): The bird hiruath of the Ever-New Tongue and hirodius of gloss on Ps. 103:17 in Vatican Codex Pal. Lat. 68.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 87–97.
ad P. Kitson, in Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 113-136.
Kitson (P.) (ref.)

Holm

2319.
Mac Gabhann (Fiachra): Logainmneacha i gceantar Bhaile Chaisleáin a thit as feidhm.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 108–112.
Drumargy, Drumnacross, Gortrumine, Holm, Portbrittas, Stroanshesk.

Honoc

4361.
Dumville (David N.): Gaelic and other Celtic names in the ninth-century ‘Northumbrian Liber Vitae': some issues and implications.
In SGS 22 (2006), pp. 1–25.
Identifies and discusses personal names of certain or arguable Irish origin (Abniar, Adamnan, Bressal, Brón, Denma, Dengus, Faelfi, Fergus, Finan, Fladgus, Reachtchriðe, Salfach, Ultan; Cuna, Cunen, Honoc, Maethcor, Mucca, Ona, Onboth).

hospitiolum (Lat)

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

hospitium (Lat)

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

(h)Úath

1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.
4672.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): Some problems in deciphering the early Irish Ogam alphabet.
In TPhS 91/2 (Nov. 1993), pp. 133–180.
Discusses in particular the transliteration of the letter Fern, and the Primitive Irish phonemic value represented by the letters Gétal, S(t)raif and (h)Úath.

húath

1214.
Schrijver (Peter): On the nature and origin of word-initial h- in the Würzburg glosses.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 205–227.
1. Introduction; 2. The Würzburg Glosses: material; 3.Evaluation: The status of h-; 4. The origins of h-; 5. The Ogam letter húath; 6. Counter-evidence: athir; 7. Conclusions. Concludes that OIr. h- of composite origin is phonemic rather than orthographic in many instances.

Húi Néill

2888.
Smyth (Alfred P.): The Húi Néill and the Leinstermen in the Annals of Ulster.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 121–143.

(h)uile

1431.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. (h)uile.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 181–182.
Reconstructs as neuter plural (collective) in *-.

(h)uisse

1445.
Willi (Andreas): Varia: III. Old Irish (h)uisse ‘just, right, fitting’.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 235–240.
Argues that OIr. (h)uisse is not related to L iūstus ‘j{u}st’ but that it originated as a past participle in the factitive (or causative) verbal paradigm of the root *Hi̯eudh-, possibly related to imperative forms uind-se, uinn-si ‘look, behold, etc.'.

húiste

12348.
Ó Muirithe (Diarmaid): Varia: V. Suggested etymological links for some Irish words.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 269–272.
druing, droing; glioscarnach; gruaim; goin; húiste; muiríoll; roc; strabóig; tascal-money.

hwch (W)

1414.
Testen (David): Stem-final *-kk- in Celtic terms for ‘pig’.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 161–164.
Proposes etymologies for *mokku- > Ir. mucc, and *sukko- > W hwch (cf. Ir. socc ‘ploughshare, snout’).

hyphen

1695.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): Úsáid an fhleiscín i scríobh na Gaeilge.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 115–122.
1. Réamhrá; 2. An fleiscín [‘hyphen’] san nGaeilge go dtí seo; 3. Moltaí CO [Litriú na Gaeilge: Lámhleabhar an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (BÁC 1945)]; 4. Prionsabail na moltaí seo; 5. An fleiscín i gComhfhocla; 6. An fleiscín le réimíreanna; 7. Críoch.