Words and Proper Names

-d (2 sg. prep. prons)

777.
McCone (Kim): Final /t/ to /d/ after unstressed vowels, and an Old Irish sound law.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 29–44.
Establishes the following sound law for the beginning of the Old Irish period: ‘a voiceless dental stop or fricative on the word boundary was regularly voiced with an unstressed vowel, but otherwise remained unvoiced.' Includes discussion of -t and -d in 2 sg. prepositional pronouns.

*d (PrIr)

1224.
Schrijver (Peter): On the development of vowels before tautosyllabic nasals in Primitive Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33–52.
1. Introduction; 2. Rise of nasalized allophones of short vowels; 3. The development of *nt, *nk into PrimIr. unlenited *d, *g; 4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’; 5. Loss of a nasal before a voicless fricative; 6. OIr. téit, -tét; 7. The relation of *nt, *nk > *d, *g to the rounding of vowels by a preceding labiovelar; 8. Summary; App.: The development of PrimIr. *and, *amb, *ang.

d’aon aidhim

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

d’aon am

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

d’aon audhm’

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

d’aon úim

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

d’fhóbair dom tuitim

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.

d’úma is

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

-da-

3804.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 3. Some infixed pronouns in Old Irish.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 165–167.
On the confusion of the acc. sg. fem and acc. pl. forms of the infixed pronoun.

14003.
Pyysalo (Jouna Olavi): Ten new etymologies between the Old Anatolian and the Celtic languages.
In SCF 11 (2014), pp. 48–66.
1. Hitt. ḫap- ‘reichlich vorhanden sein’: OIr. ana- ‘richness, property’; 2. Hitt. šinura- ‘mittellos, arm’: OIr. sēna- ‘nier, désavouer, rejeter’; 3. CLu. manai- `(beschreibt Vorratskörbe)': OIr. meinistir- (f.) ‘coffre contenant les ustensiles du culte’, 4. Hitt. mani- ‘Eiter’: OIr. mein·bligi- (pr.) ‘il foisonne, il fourmille’; 5. Hitt. maniti- ‘Wachstum (?)': OIr. muine ‘Berg’; 6. CLu. nani- ‘reinigen’: MIr. cruth·necht ‘roter Weizen’; 7. Hitt. ninga- ‘Regen’: OIr. nin- ‘cloud, wave’; 8. Hitt. KUŠšala- ‘Teil des Zaumzeugs’: OIr. selan- ‘corde, laisse de chien’; 9. Hitt. šant- ‘wertwolles Gegenstand’: OIr. sét- ‘trésor’; 10. Hitt. da- ‘all, ganz, gesamt’: OIr. ‘in full’.

-da- (inf. pron.)

884.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 2. A note on Serglige Con Culainn.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 204–205.
Takes -da- as an infixed pronoun in conda rucus ‘and I brought him’; vs. M. Dillon, SCC line 677.
Dillon (M.) (ref.)

dá ló

3200.
Williams (J. E. Caerwyn): Nodiadau amrywiol: [1.] Cymraeg ‘dydd’: Gwyddeleg ‘lá': Lladin ‘dies’ = ‘dies mortis’.
In BBCS 24/4 (May, 1972), pp. 477–481.
On dá ló etc. used to mean ‘since his (day of) death’.

dá n-ó bill

12600.
Arbuthnot (Sharon J.): Only fools and horses: dá n-ó bill and dá n-ó pill in medieval Irish texts.
In CMCS 65 (Summer, 2013), pp. 49–56.
Suggests the phrase dá n-ó bill (in the glosses to Félire Óengusso 3 July and Sanas Cormaic Y §179) represents phonetic spelling for dá n-ó pill ‘two ears of a horse’, and was mistakenly associated with OIr. bill, bell by early Irish glossators.

dabach

8493.
Hamp (Eric P.): Two notes on Italic and Celtic: [2.] Umbrian tapistenu.
In AGI 58 (1973), pp. 140–141.
Compared to OIr. dabach.
13369.
Williams (Gareth): The dabhach reconsidered: Pre-Norse or Post-Norse?
In Northern studies 37 (2003), pp. 17–32.
16198.
Bannerman (John): The Scots language and the kin-based society.
In Gaelic and Scots in harmony (1990), pp. 1–19.
Discusses the use of Gaelic legal terms and concepts in Scots law.
16874.
Williams (Gareth): Land assessment and the silver economy of Norse Scotland.
In Sagas, saints and settlements (2004), pp. 65–104.
Also on the Scottish land-measures tirunga (ounce-land) and dabhach (davoch).

Dabhach Phádraig

5405.
O’Dolain (Mairead): Dabhach Phádraig.
In Clogher record 18/1 (2003), pp. 103–116.

dabhach (ScG)

4485.
MacQueen (John): Pennyland and Davoch in South-Western Scotland: a preliminary note.
In ScS 23 (1979), pp. 69–74.
Discusses the following place-names elements: 1. peighinn; 2. leithpheighinn; 3. fàirdean; 4. dabhach; 5. ceathramh.
16874.
Williams (Gareth): Land assessment and the silver economy of Norse Scotland.
In Sagas, saints and settlements (2004), pp. 65–104.
Also on the Scottish land-measures tirunga (ounce-land) and dabhach (davoch).
18902.
Ross (Alasdair): Land assessment and lordship in medieval northern Scotland.
TMC, 14. Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. xiv + 393 pp. illus., maps. (The medieval countryside, 14).
Rev. by
Erica Steiner, in JAEMA 14 (2018), pp. 114-116.

dabhach (ScG) (in place names)

13455.
Taylor (Simon): Pictish place-names revisited.
In Pictish progress (2011), pp. 67–118.
Examines the distribution of place-names in northern Britain which contain elements defined as P-Celtic. Appendix 1: Survey of place-name elements organized according to their degree of Pictishness (Category 1: P-Celtic words probably not borrowed into Gaelic: *aber or *abbor, *bren or *brun, *cēt, *cuper, *dol, *eclēs, *lanerc, *mig, *ogel, *pant, *pen, *pert, *pevr, *pren, ?*roth, *traus/*tros, Note on *nemed; Category 2: P-Celtic words borrowed into Gaelic but only attested in place-names: *cair, *carden, *gronn; Category 3: P-Celtic loan-words attested as common nouns in Gaelic: bad, dail, monadh, pett, pòr, preas; Category 4: Gaelic elements influenced by a Pictish cognate: ? beinn, blàr, càrn, dabhach, dùn, foithir, lios, ràth, srath); Appendix 2: The problem of Cardean; Appendix 3: A note on Keir; Appendix 4: Certain, probable or possible ‘Pictish’ names containing elements not discussed above.

dada

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

dadaidh

1673.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Donegal a dhath ar bith.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh, 1977–1978), pp. 197–202.
Discusses different responses in LASID for the word ‘anything’ in Ulster dialects and their distribution, e.g. a dhath, aon dath, dadaidh, dadamh, rud ar bith, etc. Outlines how a dhath ar bith may have been introduced into Omeath Irish from North-West Donegal.

dadamh

1673.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Donegal a dhath ar bith.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh, 1977–1978), pp. 197–202.
Discusses different responses in LASID for the word ‘anything’ in Ulster dialects and their distribution, e.g. a dhath, aon dath, dadaidh, dadamh, rud ar bith, etc. Outlines how a dhath ar bith may have been introduced into Omeath Irish from North-West Donegal.

dae

1419.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: V. On a possible Celto-Germanic etymological correspondence.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 179–181.
Argues that MIr. doe, dae ‘a human being’ is a cognate of Germanic *dewz-á-.

Dagda

2042.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (1–24).
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 183–209.
1756.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (24–120).
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 1–35.
Continued from Éigse 18 (1981), pp. 183-209.
1775.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (84–93, 120–167).
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 230–262.
Continued from Éigse 19 (1982), pp. 1-35.
2735.
Sterckx (Claude): Images monétaires et mythes celtes.
In ZCP 47 (1995), pp. 1–17.
Discusses medieval Irish and Welsh analogues to Gaulish myths, including the Dagda or Eochaid Ollathair, the Irish counterpart of Gaulish Sucellus.
6997.
Sayers (William): Cerrce, an archaic epithet of the Dagda, Cernunnos and Conall Cernach.
In JIES 16/3-4 (Fall/Winter, 1988), pp. 341–364.
ad Cath Maige Tuired §93 (as ed. by E. A. Gray, 1982). Discusses the various epithets of the Dagda, focusing on Cerrce and its etymology.
8941.
Isaac (G. R.): Mediaeval Welsh Englynion duad and Proto-Indo-European *diḗus ph2tḗr.
In JCS 5 (2005), pp. 97–106.
4399.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Dag(h)d(h)ae and his relatives.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 162–169.
Argues that maith, dag, Dag(dae), Danann (< *Danu), 2 donn ‘princely’, de(i)n are all members of a semantic field ‘good’, and dicusses its etymological connection with a similar semantic system in Italic.

Dagdae

3886.
Blažek (Václav): Celtic-Slavic parallels in mythology and sacral lexicon.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 1 (2006), pp. 75–85.
1. Old Irish Dagdae < Celtic *dago-dēuo- ‘good god’ ⁓ Slavic *Dažьbogъ; 2. Old Irish Macha < Celtic *Makasiā ⁓ Slavic *Mokošь; 3. Middle Welsh Pwyll, lit. ‘wisdom’ < Celtic *kweislo- ⁓ Old Czech PremyzlPrimizl; 4. Gaulish ratet ‘he pledges, promises, guarantees’, Old Irish ráth ‘surety, guarantor, suretyship; guarantee, pledge’ ⁓ Slavic * rota ‘oath’.

Daghdha Eochaidh Ollathair

2735.
Sterckx (Claude): Images monétaires et mythes celtes.
In ZCP 47 (1995), pp. 1–17.
Discusses medieval Irish and Welsh analogues to Gaulish myths, including the Dagda or Eochaid Ollathair, the Irish counterpart of Gaulish Sucellus.

Daghdhae

4399.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Dag(h)d(h)ae and his relatives.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 162–169.
Argues that maith, dag, Dag(dae), Danann (< *Danu), 2 donn ‘princely’, de(i)n are all members of a semantic field ‘good’, and dicusses its etymological connection with a similar semantic system in Italic.

daibhir

7885.
Breeze (Andrew): A Gaelic etymology for dyvour ‘debtor’.
In ScotL 26 (2007), p. 23.
Suggests < EIr. daidbir.

daidbhir

7885.
Breeze (Andrew): A Gaelic etymology for dyvour ‘debtor’.
In ScotL 26 (2007), p. 23.
Suggests < EIr. daidbir.

dáig

3747.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 5. dóig ám.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 195–196.
ad DIL D, 304.17-24, where the phrase dóig ám ‘for, because’ (< Middle Irish conjunction dáig + emphasizing particle ám) is erroneously given under the adjective dóig.

daig

2899.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia etymologica: 1. Welsh ffriw, ewin, tafod and labio-velars.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 461–466.
OIr. tengae, ingen, lugu, daig, snigid.

daighean

729.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Diabhal (deamhan 7 rl.) mar dheis chomhréire sa nGaeilge.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 46–58.
Diabhal, d(h)eamhan, damnú, daighean, etc. as syntactic devices. Discussion of use in Irish dialects and possible influence of English ‘devil’.

Dáil Cais

540.
Ó Corráin (Donncha): Dáil Cais: church and dynasty.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 52–63.

dail (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

dail (ScG) (in place names)

13455.
Taylor (Simon): Pictish place-names revisited.
In Pictish progress (2011), pp. 67–118.
Examines the distribution of place-names in northern Britain which contain elements defined as P-Celtic. Appendix 1: Survey of place-name elements organized according to their degree of Pictishness (Category 1: P-Celtic words probably not borrowed into Gaelic: *aber or *abbor, *bren or *brun, *cēt, *cuper, *dol, *eclēs, *lanerc, *mig, *ogel, *pant, *pen, *pert, *pevr, *pren, ?*roth, *traus/*tros, Note on *nemed; Category 2: P-Celtic words borrowed into Gaelic but only attested in place-names: *cair, *carden, *gronn; Category 3: P-Celtic loan-words attested as common nouns in Gaelic: bad, dail, monadh, pett, pòr, preas; Category 4: Gaelic elements influenced by a Pictish cognate: ? beinn, blàr, càrn, dabhach, dùn, foithir, lios, ràth, srath); Appendix 2: The problem of Cardean; Appendix 3: A note on Keir; Appendix 4: Certain, probable or possible ‘Pictish’ names containing elements not discussed above.

dáilem

4770.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (1. Teil).
In Sprache 43/2 (2002–2003), pp. 171–211.
Collects and analyses instances of agent nouns in -em: Prototypen bzw. frühere Bildungen (ainim(m)/anaim(m), talam); Bekannte und gesicherte -amon und -(i)i̯amon-Bildungen (airem, betham, brithem, cairem, dáilem, dúilem, féchem, fethem, flaithem, glaídem, legam, luam, medam, mraithem, orb(b)am, súainem).

Continued in Die Sprache 44 (2004), 26-69.

daimliag

16100.
MacDonald (Aidan): The ‘cathedral’, Temple Kelly and Temple Ciarán: notes from the annals.
In Clonmacnoise studies 2 (2003), pp. 125–135.
Searches the annals for references to: 1. The daimliag [the bishop’s stone church]; 2. The dairthech [timber church possibly on same site as later O’Kelly’s church]; 3. Eaglais Beag [identified with Temple Ciarán].

dáinde (ghost-word)

6689.
Bourke (Cormac): The work of angels?
In IR 50/1 (Spring, 1999), pp. 76–79.
ad AU 1007.11: doendai ‘man-made’.

daingean

5005.
Flanagan (Deirdre): Some less frequently attested Irish place-name elements of archaeological interest.
In Nomina 7 (1983), pp. 31–33.
longphort, daingean.

Daingean, An

6413.
MacCotter (Paul): An Daingean and Dingle: what’s in a name?
In JKAHS (2nd ser.) 6 (2006), pp. 89–97.

daingen

12819.
Pronk (Tijmen): Several Indo-European words for ‘dense’ and their etymologies.
In JIES 41/1-2 (Spring/Summer, 2013), pp. 1–19.
Celtic words include OIr. dai(n)gen, tiug, téchtaid, *tocaid, tocad.
11636.
Jacobs (Nicolas): Irish influence on medieaval Welsh vocabulary: the case of the gnomic poems.
In Ilteangach, ilseiftiúil [Fs. N. J. A. Williams] (2012), pp. 97–120.
Offers an account of selected instances (both certain and doubtful) of lexical borrowing from Irish into Welsh: MW archan, MW diarchenad (< OIr. acrann?); MW cleirch (< OIr. cléirech); MW cor, dryccor (< OIr. cor, *droccor); MW denghyn (< OIr. daingen); MW graen(n)wyn(n) (perhaps includes OIr. gráin as element?); MW llonn (< OIr. lonn); MW mab llen (< OIr. mac léiginn); MW ochsael/ochsail (< OIr. oxal); MW wynebclawr (< OIr. clárainech).

Dair

1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.

daire

3072.
Hamp (Eric): Varia: 33. Irish daire ‘grove’.
In ÉtC 25 (1988), pp. 125–127.

daire dána

8948.
Breeze (Andrew): Notes on some Scottish words and phrases: Mugdock, ploddeil, hallock, `dery dan', `carlingis pet'.
In ScotL 28 (2009), pp. 27–38.
[1.] The name and battle of Mugdock, near Milngavie; [2.] Black Agnes Dunbar and her ploddeil [< Ir. plód + Fr. coll. -aille]; [3.] A Celtic etymology for hallock ‘foolish girl’; [4.] A Gaelic etymology for Dunbar’s dery dan [< Ir. daire dána]; [5.] Dunbar’s carlingis pet [< Ir. peata].

Daire Mór

3408.
Manning (Conleth): Daire Mór identified.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 359–369.
Longfordpass (alias Durrihy), Co. Tipperary.

Addenda in Peritia 12 (1998), p. 270.

Daire na Fland

2043.
Ní Chatháin (Próinséas): Derrynavlan.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 210.
3942.
Byrne (Francis John): Derrynavlan: the historical context.
In JRSAI 110 (1980), pp. 116–126.

dairt

13611.
Breeze (Andrew): Notes on some cruces in Middle Scots poetry: Henryson’s Bawdronis, dart oxin and bacis, Dunbar’s Strenever and Wallidrag, Gavin Douglas’s Lundeys Lufe, Threte and Treilʓeis.
In ScotL 29 (2010), pp. 1–15.
[1.] Henryson’s Bawdronis the cat [not < Ir. beadrach]; [2.] Henryson’s dart oxin [< Ir. dairt]; [3.] bacis in Henryson’s The annunciation; [4.] Dunbar’s Strenever; [5.] Wallydrag ‘good-fot-nothing’ and Gaelic [< MIr. súaitrech]; [6.] Gavin Douglas’s Of Lundeys Lufe; [7.] Gavin Douglas’s in threte [< Ir. i dtraite]; [8.] Gavin Douglas’s Treilʓeis [< Ir. trilis].

dairthech

13029.
Manning (Conleth): References to church buildings in the Annals.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 37–52.
Studies the occurrence of the following terms: oratorium; dairthech; damliac; teampall, templum; eclais; erdamh, airdam; taigi aernaighi; cell, civitas; recles.
15807.
Manning (Conleth): A note on dairthech.
16100.
MacDonald (Aidan): The ‘cathedral’, Temple Kelly and Temple Ciarán: notes from the annals.
In Clonmacnoise studies 2 (2003), pp. 125–135.
Searches the annals for references to: 1. The daimliag [the bishop’s stone church]; 2. The dairthech [timber church possibly on same site as later O’Kelly’s church]; 3. Eaglais Beag [identified with Temple Ciarán].

dais

3721.
Lockwood (W. B.): Chr. Matras’ studies on the Gaelic element in Faroese: conclusions and results.
In SGS 13/1 (Autumn, 1978), pp. 112–126.
Surveys eight publications by Christian Matras (1900-1988) on Irish loan words in Faeroese, focusing particularly on the loans from dronn, bláthach, *slabac, dais, cró, tarb, ScG làmh chearr (< OIr. *lám cherr), muirean (or muirín, muiríneach, etc.), sopp, áirge.
Matras (Christian) (ref.)

daisser (MEngl)

1324.
Breeze (Andrew): Middle English daisser and Irish deisréad ‘sprinkler’.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 150–152.
Derives daisser ‘sprinkler’ (in MEngl. 13th c. poem) from Ir. deisréad < earlier int esríat ‘the sprinkler’.

dál

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

dál (in place names)

11842.
MacCotter (Paul): Drong and dál as synonyms for óenach.
In Peritia 22–23 (2011–2012), pp. 275–280.

Dál Riata

2063.
Dumville (David N.): Ireland and North Britain in the earlier Middle Ages: contexts for Míniugud senchusa fher nAlban.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 185–212.
With a genealogical chart. Incl. ed. based on Bannerman’s own from MS TCD 1298 and commentary.
2065.
Bannerman (John): Studies in the history of Dalriada.
Edinburgh and London: Scottish Academic Press, 1974. x + 178 pp.
Edition and study of Senchus fer nAlban; text based on TCD MS H 2. 7, with variant readings from RIA MSS 23 P 12 (Book of Ballymote) and 23 P 2 (Book of Lecan). Incl. text from UCD Add. Ir. MS 14 (Mac Firbisigh’s Book of Genealogies). Cf. J. Bannerman 1966 (BILL 8863). Follows an account of the Convention of Druim Cett (575).

Rev. by
T. M. Charles-Edwards, in StH 15 (1975), pp. 194-196.
Donald Macaulay, in The Scottish historical review 58/1 (Apr., 1979), pp. 92-93.
Donnchadh Ó Corráin, in Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 169-182.
10960.
Fraser (James E.): Dux Reuda and the Corcu Réti.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 3 (2006), pp. 1–9.

dálach

1502.
Ó Súilleabháin (Pádraig): Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh, 1973), pp. 22–23.
1. dálach ‘mournful, sad, sorrowful’ in Annals of the Four Masters; 2. slam: siabhra slaim ‘fairy or magic hosts ?' (sic leg. not siabhra Sláini as printed by O’Donovan in his edition of Annals of the Four Masters) ; 3. tiagh: as a tiaghaibh in Annals of Ulster vs. as a ttiaghaibh fearrdha in (unpublished portion of) Annals of the Four Masters.
O’Donovan (John) (ref.)

dall

812.
Watkins (Calvert): ‘Blind’ in Celtic and Romance.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 113–116.
dall, caoch.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 691-694.
5095.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): On the expression and concept of blindness in Irish.
In StH 19 (1979), pp. 26–62.
OIr. dall, cáech, goll, lethcháech.
3038.
Lejeune (Michel): Brittonica et Gallica: 2. Gallica: Du nouveau sur cécité et voyance chez les Celtes.
In ÉtC 22 (1985), pp. 233–234.
ad C. Watkins in Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 113-116.
15855.
Ní Chrábhagáin (Ciara): Disease and illness in medieval Ireland: an anthropological examination of some hagiographical material.
In RíM 24 (2013), pp. 115–133.
Examines the usage of names of illnesses and diseases occurring in the text of Bethada náem nÉrenn: 1. amlabar, bacach, bodhar, clamhdall, lobhar; 2. aillse, fiolun fionn, easbadha, cuthach; scamach, lirach, moirtin marbh, bás obann, ifreann; esláinte theinntidhe, galar cos, demhan.
15995.
Zhivlova (Nina): Rare and unique names of ‘non-Indo-European’ type and the case of Dallán Forgaill.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 7 (2015), pp. 149–162.
Discusses the name elements becc/bécc, cáech, dóel, túaim; includes an excursus on Dallán Forgaill.

Dall Glic

11697.
Ó hÓgáin (Dáithí): An Dall Glic agus an éigse.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 611–639.
Discusses the motif of the Blind Wise Man.

Dallán Forgaill

15995.
Zhivlova (Nina): Rare and unique names of ‘non-Indo-European’ type and the case of Dallán Forgaill.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 7 (2015), pp. 149–162.
Discusses the name elements becc/bécc, cáech, dóel, túaim; includes an excursus on Dallán Forgaill.

Dalmellington

5459.
Ansell (Michael): Carsphairn and Dalmellington revisited.
In JSNS 2 (2008), pp. 1–10.

Dalriada

2065.
Bannerman (John): Studies in the history of Dalriada.
Edinburgh and London: Scottish Academic Press, 1974. x + 178 pp.
Edition and study of Senchus fer nAlban; text based on TCD MS H 2. 7, with variant readings from RIA MSS 23 P 12 (Book of Ballymote) and 23 P 2 (Book of Lecan). Incl. text from UCD Add. Ir. MS 14 (Mac Firbisigh’s Book of Genealogies). Cf. J. Bannerman 1966 (BILL 8863). Follows an account of the Convention of Druim Cett (575).

Rev. by
T. M. Charles-Edwards, in StH 15 (1975), pp. 194-196.
Donald Macaulay, in The Scottish historical review 58/1 (Apr., 1979), pp. 92-93.
Donnchadh Ó Corráin, in Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 169-182.
4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

dalta

2476.
Jaski (Bart): Cú Chulainn, gormac and dalta of the Ulstermen.
In CMCS 37 (Summer, 1999), pp. 1–31.
Examines the institution of fosterage in early Ireland, focusing on the adoption of Cú Chulainn by Conchobar and the other prominent Ulstermen. Discusses in particular the terms: gormac, dalta, nia, mac fóesma, sét gerta (or gairitechta), orba niad and orba dúthrachta. Cf. T. Ó Cathasaigh, in Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 128-160.

dám

1188.
McCone (Kim): Varia: I. The etymology of Old Irish déis ‘client(s)'.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 193–197.
Derives from *dem- ‘house(hold)'; cf. dám ‘retinue (of clients)' < *domo- ‘house(hold)'.
2590.
Hamp (Eric P.): Celtic *dām- and vṛddhi and δᾶμος.
In ZCP 36 (1978), pp. 5–12.
Derives OIr. dám from PIE *dom-u-s, arguing that the long vocalism has been transferred from the strong cases of a hypothetical CC root-noun from PIE *dom- and therefore excluding the possibility of vṛddhi derivation. Cf. E. Campanile, in BBCS 26/3 (1975), pp. 305-306.
3219.
Campanile (Enrico): Nodiadau amrywiol: [1.] Two morphological archaisms: 1. OIr. dám ‘retinue’, W daw ‘son-in-law’.
In BBCS 26/3 (Nov., 1975), pp. 305–306.
Argues that OIr. dám, fíad are vr̥ddhi formations of PIE *domos ‘house’, *widu ‘forest’, respectively.
8333.
Campanile (Enrico): Un arcaismo morfologico del celtico.
In IncLing 1 (1974), pp. 51–54.
Argues OIr. dám is a vr̥ddhi formation of PIE *domo- ‘house’.

dám dásachtach

16708.
Falileyev (Alexander): Welsh equivalents to the Irish fian? Some further considerations on juvenile delinquency in medieval Wales.
In CMCS 73 (Summer, 2017), pp. 31–59.
Provides further medieval Welsh parallels to the passage referred to by Simon Rodway in Studi Celtici 7.191 ff.; also suggests Welsh ynfydion may have a parallel in the Irish dám dásachtach of Togail Bruidne Da Derga.

dam tuli

2450.
Carey (John): The encounter at the ford: warriors, water and women.
In Éigse 34 (2004), pp. 10–24.
Explores the association of fluvial water with female sexuality and its interaction with warlike activity.

Damán

2264.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): Some bogus Irish saints.
In Ainm 3 (1988), pp. 1–8.
Anesus (Nesus), Bríg, Ciar, Conchliath, Damán, Feilic, Feimme, Medrán, Meic Mochoba, Modiúit (Modút), Ródán, Sénán, Sillán, T’eolas.

damliac

13029.
Manning (Conleth): References to church buildings in the Annals.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 37–52.
Studies the occurrence of the following terms: oratorium; dairthech; damliac; teampall, templum; eclais; erdamh, airdam; taigi aernaighi; cell, civitas; recles.

Damnat, St.

2527.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): Early Irish saints’ cults and their constituencies.
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 79–102.
Focuses on the Fothairt saints Damnat, Brigit and Fintan, and argues that the characteristics of a particular saint’s cult were dependent on kindred, politics and territory. In appendix contains a translation of Bethu Phátraic lines 2195-2218 (as ed. by K. Mulchrone, 1939 [Best2 1993]).

damnú

729.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Diabhal (deamhan 7 rl.) mar dheis chomhréire sa nGaeilge.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 46–58.
Diabhal, d(h)eamhan, damnú, daighean, etc. as syntactic devices. Discussion of use in Irish dialects and possible influence of English ‘devil’.

damscuithe

2993.
Binchy (Daniel A.): Varia Hibernica: 2. Substantival dvandva-compounds in Irish.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 38–41.
Identifies further examples, mostly from the law-texts.

dán

826.
McCaughey (Terence P.): The performing of dán.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 39–57.
1834.
Watkins (Calvert): The etymology of Irish dúan.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 270–277.
Derives it from *dap-nā, cf. L damnum. Also on other terminology from the reciprocal context of encomiastic poetry.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 536-543.

dán

15912.
Breatnach (Liam): On Old Irish collective and abstract nouns, the meaning of cétmuinter, and marriage in early mediaeval Ireland.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 1–29.
I. Discusses the use of words to signify both an abstract concept and a person who embodies it, or both a collective and an individual member of the collective: cerd, dán, díberg, flaith, grád, nemed, ráth, naidm, aitire, cland, eclais, fine, muinter; II. The meaning of cétmuinter [Argues it meant ‘spouse’ and could be applied to both husband and wife].

dán díreach

1277.
Mac Cárthaigh (Eoin): Article + uile + noun and IGT II §20.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 45–70.
1. Text of IGT II §20; 2. Corpus of examples; 3. Index of poets in the corpus; 4. Discussion; 5. Statement of conclusions: incl. rules for the construction of article + uile + noun in dán díreach.
1670.
Mac an Bhaird (Alan): Dán díreach agus ranna as na hannála 867-1134.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh, 1977–1978), pp. 157–168.
Based on verse mostly from AFM and AU1, illustrates the gradual development of dán díreach from the ninth to twelfth century. Fifteen verses / excerpts ed. from printed editions of AFM and AU, with Engl transl. and notes. First lines: 1. Flann mac Conaing cosnaidh ríogh; 2. Ba congbhaidh Cearbhall do ghréas; 3. Brónach inniu Éire uagh; 4. Sudrall Muighe (maith re bágh); 5. Lasar Laighean lir go tráigh; 6. Má ro bíoth ua Breasail Bhric; 7. Ó ad-bhath Donnchadh, deilm do raoi; 8. Macha mhainbhtheach meadhraid muaidh; 9. Duibhlitir dionn eagna uaigh; 10. Flann a prímhchill Bhuithe bhinn; 11. Rángadar Laighin Luimneach; 12. Dubhthach duine dlightheach dúr; 13. Cumha ardríogh in Áth Cliath; 14. Ní chuala coinnmheadh n-eimhir; 15. Moghéanar duit id dheathaigh.

dàn (ScG)

10655.
MacInnes (John): The panegyric code in Gaelic poetry and its historical background.
In TGSI 50 (1976–1978), pp. 435–498.
Analyses the conventions of Scottish Gaelic praise poetry from the period c. 1600-1745.

Repr. in Dùthchas nan Gàidheal, pp. 265-319.

Danair

5042.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Nationality names in the Irish annals.
In Nomina 16 (1992–1993), pp. 49–70.
Discusses the terms Ériu, Féni, Scotti, Goídil, Cruthin, Picti, Albu, Bretain, Angli, Saxain, Frainc, Geinti, Gaill, Gall-Ghaedhil, Nordmainn, Lochlainn, Danair.

Danann

2052.
Carey (John): The name Tuatha Dé Danann.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 291–294.
Argues that the derivation of OIr. *Danu from a Common Celtic source is a false assumption; Túatha Dé Danann results of the disambiguation of the term Túatha Dé ‘old gods’.
4399.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Dag(h)d(h)ae and his relatives.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 162–169.
Argues that maith, dag, Dag(dae), Danann (< *Danu), 2 donn ‘princely’, de(i)n are all members of a semantic field ‘good’, and dicusses its etymological connection with a similar semantic system in Italic.

dance of death

1661.
Breeze (Andrew): The dance of death.
In CMCS 13 (Summer, 1987), pp. 87–96.
A study of this motif in British and Continental art and literature and its appearance in Welsh poetry of the 15th and 16th centuries.

danó

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.

*Danu

2052.
Carey (John): The name Tuatha Dé Danann.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 291–294.
Argues that the derivation of OIr. *Danu from a Common Celtic source is a false assumption; Túatha Dé Danann results of the disambiguation of the term Túatha Dé ‘old gods’.
4399.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Dag(h)d(h)ae and his relatives.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 162–169.
Argues that maith, dag, Dag(dae), Danann (< *Danu), 2 donn ‘princely’, de(i)n are all members of a semantic field ‘good’, and dicusses its etymological connection with a similar semantic system in Italic.

daoin-uaisle

16198.
Bannerman (John): The Scots language and the kin-based society.
In Gaelic and Scots in harmony (1990), pp. 1–19.
Discusses the use of Gaelic legal terms and concepts in Scots law.

daor

3464.
Greene (David): Varia: IV. 2. ‘Cheap’ and ‘dear’ in Modern Irish.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 161–167.
saor, daor, and derivates.

daorach

436.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 1–10.
1. bleachtaire, miolcaire; 2. bráca; 3. burdún; 4. cailpís; 5. cáipéis/cáipís; 6. daorach; 7. malach; 8. ninsceachán, ninsci, ninscim, etc.; 9. painéad; 10. pasálann; 11. pasúr; 12. slincín; 13. splincéara; 14. sprioc; 15. trantal.
1936.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 160–164.
1. *airmnecht; 2. crioslach; 3. daorach; 4. fabhairne; 5. fearacht; 6. imirt; 7. isteal; 8. praistéal.

daor-rath

2500.
Broderick (George): Tynwald: a Manx cult-site and institution of pre-Scandinavian origin?
In CMCS 46 (Winter, 2003), pp. 55–94.
Argues that the Manx Tynwald continues a Celtic rather than a Germanic tradition. Appendix contains a contemporary account of the Tynwald Fair Day of 1691.

daor-rath (ScG)

4313.
Gillies (William): Some thoughts on the toschederach.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 128–142.
Presents a detailed linguistic study of the name of this medieval Scottish officer, and suggests that it is to be derived from ScG toiseach daor-raith (cf. OIr. dóer-rath ‘base clientship’).

-dar

1513.
Nilsen (Kenneth E.): A new third person plural subject pronoun in the Irish of Bun a’ Cruc, Sraith Salach, Conamara.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh, 1973), pp. 114–116.
On the use of the 3 pl. past tense marker -dar as an independent subject pronoun.

dar

1971.
Breatnach (P. A.): A note on the syntax of the particle dar.
In Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 130–132.
Use of dar = do.
3125.
Ó Murchú (Liam P.): The literary asseveration in Irish.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 327–332.
Studies prepositional phrases consisting of dar + noun.

(-)dar (3 pl.)

898.
McGonagle (Noel): Migration of verbal terminations.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 93–97.
On the analogical spread of certain verbal endings, some of which gain independent pronominal status, e.g. -(e)as (1 sg.); -(a)is, -(a)inns, -(a)ir, -, -f(a)í (2 sg.); (-)mar, -(e)amuid, -muis(t) (1 pl.); (-)dar, -(a)id, -dís(t) (3 pl.); -f(e)á, -tf(a)í (impers.); -f(e)ar, -(e)adh, -(e)as (impers.) with irregular verbs; -t(e)ars, -th(e)ars, -f(e)ars (impers.).

dar an eóruinn

1707.
Williams (N. J. A.): Leagan cainte in Párliament na mban.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh, 1978), p. 330.
vs. B. Ó Cuív, Párliament na mBan (Dublin 1952), 146; dar an eóruinn (l. 2357) ‘by the anvil’ (i.e. ‘by St. Patrick’s anvil’); eóruinn < inneoir < inneoin ‘anvil’.
Ó Cuív (B.) (ref.)

Dar ‘daughter’

2792.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 1. Die irische Tochter.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 92–94.
Argues that the Indo-European word for ‘daughter’ is continued by the OIr. personal name Dechtir, in pretonic position also Der (vel. sim).

dar le

9554.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Dar le.
In Dán do oide [Ó Cléirigh essays] (1997), pp. 545–558.

Dar Óma

723.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Onomata.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 165–180.
1. Dar Óma (related to Ogmios); 2. Tairdelbach; 3. Ó Loith; 4. Uí Chobthaigh and their pedigrees; 5. Ua Carráin, Ó Corráin, (O) Curran(e); 6. Máel Dúin mac Áeda and Brega; 7. Dub Indrecht mac Cathassaich, King of Araid; 8. Corco Auluim (Úlum); 9. The supposed monastery of Alltraige Caille; 10. Cnámraige.

darco

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Dardaoin álainn

1569.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Dardaoin Álainn.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh, 1976), p. 238.
Dardaoin Álainn refers to the Feast of Corpus Christi.

Dardis (family name)

5486.
Gallwey (Hubert): The family of Dardis.
In RíM 6/2 (1976), pp. 58–80.

Darerca (or Monenna), St.

14110.
Sperber (Ingrid): The life of St. Monenna or Darerca of Killevy.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 63–97.
English translation of the Life of St. Darerca from the Codex Salmanticensis.

Darí (St)

512.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): A misunderstood annal: a hitherto unnoticed Cáin.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 561–566.
Annals of Inisfallen, s.a. 810, is to be taken as ‘the law (or laws) concerning cows, of Darí and of Aduar son of Echen, promulgated in Mumu’.

dàsachdach (ScG)

13253.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Am buadhfhacal meadhan-aoiseach meranach agus mearan, mearanach, dàsachdach, dàsan(n)ach na Gàidhlig.
In ScS 37 (2014), pp. 183–206.
Argues MIr. meranach (in the name Aedh Meranach) could be based on *meránach, ultimately < mer ‘demented’.

dásacht

16708.
Falileyev (Alexander): Welsh equivalents to the Irish fian? Some further considerations on juvenile delinquency in medieval Wales.
In CMCS 73 (Summer, 2017), pp. 31–59.
Provides further medieval Welsh parallels to the passage referred to by Simon Rodway in Studi Celtici 7.191 ff.; also suggests Welsh ynfydion may have a parallel in the Irish dám dásachtach of Togail Bruidne Da Derga.

dásachtach

13253.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Am buadhfhacal meadhan-aoiseach meranach agus mearan, mearanach, dàsachdach, dàsan(n)ach na Gàidhlig.
In ScS 37 (2014), pp. 183–206.
Argues MIr. meranach (in the name Aedh Meranach) could be based on *meránach, ultimately < mer ‘demented’.
13860.
Hayden (Deborah): On the meaning of two medieval Irish medical terms: derg dásachtach and rúad (fh)rasach.
In Ériu 64 (2014), pp. 1–21.
Argues, based on an analysis of Irish early medical sources, that these terms refer to blood vessels.

dàsan(n)ach (ScG)

13253.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Am buadhfhacal meadhan-aoiseach meranach agus mearan, mearanach, dàsachdach, dàsan(n)ach na Gàidhlig.
In ScS 37 (2014), pp. 183–206.
Argues MIr. meranach (in the name Aedh Meranach) could be based on *meránach, ultimately < mer ‘demented’.

dath

1673.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Donegal a dhath ar bith.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh, 1977–1978), pp. 197–202.
Discusses different responses in LASID for the word ‘anything’ in Ulster dialects and their distribution, e.g. a dhath, aon dath, dadaidh, dadamh, rud ar bith, etc. Outlines how a dhath ar bith may have been introduced into Omeath Irish from North-West Donegal.
3180.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: [3.] Vieil-irlandais dattae ‘joli’.
In ÉtC 35 (2003), p. 168.
11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.
10995.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Glossary entries on anart ‘a shroud’, the drink of death and the conjunction dath ‘because’.
In SGS 24 (2008), pp. 39–51.
On the anart entries in Sanas Cormaic (Corm. Y §37) and Dúil Dromma Cetta (CIH ii 605.15), focusing on the meaning of the citation dath don dich irt, which is interpreted as ‘because death comes’. In Appendix discusses two further instances of conjunction dath ‘because’ from Dúil Dromma Cetta.

dath, daithín

1765.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Leaganacha as Conamara.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 150–158.
I. I gcás go: (a) ‘cé go’; (b) `(cuir) i gcás’. II. Dath ‘cuid’, etc. III. An freagra biorránach.

dattae

3180.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: [3.] Vieil-irlandais dattae ‘joli’.
In ÉtC 35 (2003), p. 168.

daur

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

Daviot and Dunlichity, Inverness-shire

10641.
MacPherson (John): Place names in the parish of Daviot and Dunlichity.
In TGSI 49 (1974–1976), pp. 1–8.

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.
11985.
Carey (John): Dee ‘pagan deity’.
In Ériu 62 (2012), pp. 33–42.
Suggests it is an early doublet of día, to which it supplies its plural forms.

-de

1282.
Isaac (G. R.): Varia: I. deibide.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 161–163.
On the terms rannaigecht ‘unitary-stanza-making’ and deibide ‘differentiated, disagreeing (form)', the latter representing a substantivised adjectival derivative from deibe ‘difference, variety, disagreement’ + adjectival de, vs. GOI §392, where it is suggested that deibide derives from de + bíthe ‘cut in two’.

de-

1282.
Isaac (G. R.): Varia: I. deibide.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 161–163.
On the terms rannaigecht ‘unitary-stanza-making’ and deibide ‘differentiated, disagreeing (form)', the latter representing a substantivised adjectival derivative from deibe ‘difference, variety, disagreement’ + adjectival de, vs. GOI §392, where it is suggested that deibide derives from de + bíthe ‘cut in two’.

de

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.
15999.
Bayda (Viktor): Irish constructions with bain.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 7 (2015), pp. 213–227.
Focuses on light-verb constructions consisting of bain with the prepositions as or de.

dĕ-

9010.
Hamp (Eric P.): Oscan notes: 1. Oscan dat ‘dē', Old Irish dĕ-.
In AJPh 101/2 (Summer, 1980), pp. 190–191.

dé (cechtar dé)

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.

de chois

2774.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Miscellanea: 5. Ad Éigse xviii. 285-7.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 123–124.
On the pronunciation of the oblique form of cos in de chois ‘by foot’ in the verse of Dáibhí Ó Bruadair; cf. B. Ó Cuív, in Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 285-287.

dé ‘day’

2901.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia etymologica: 3. *dieu- ‘day’ in Celtic.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 472–477.
OIr. dia.

dea

11985.
Carey (John): Dee ‘pagan deity’.
In Ériu 62 (2012), pp. 33–42.
Suggests it is an early doublet of día, to which it supplies its plural forms.

dëac

1238.
Schrijver (Peter): Varia: IV. OIr. dëec, dëac.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 181–184.
ad R. Hertz, in Lexis 4 (1955) 66-69. Derives dëec from *dechǣg (< PC *dekank < *deḱm-kwe ‘and ten’) with dissimilatory loss of *-ch- (or *-k-) before *-g-.

deach

8006.
Mac Aongusa (Máire): Seachta frisa toimsiter Gaedhelg: seven things by which Gaedhelg is measured.
In SCF 5 (2008), pp. 54–63.
Discusses the terms fid, deach, réim, forbaid, alt, insce and etargaire as they appear in the Book of Ballymote version of Auraicept na n-éces.

Deachraidh

1311.
Byrne (F. J.): Monastica et onomastica.
In Peritia 2 (1983), pp. 261–264.
Identifies dat. sg. Deachraidh in poem, Triallom timcheall na Fódla by Seaán Mór Ó Dubhagáin, as the same element seen in Mag nDechrad (< *Dechrae), located adjacent to Donaghpatrick (Co. Meath).

déag

795.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Cardinal numbers in Modern Irish.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 99–107.
[1.] general usage; [2.] Use of plural forms (units of measurement, set phrases); [3.] Irregularities of mutation. Also on the lenition of déag and fichead.
11750.
Ó Flaithearta (Mícheál): An focal ‘déag’ sa Ghaeilge.
In Diasa díograise [Ó Briain essays] (2009), pp. 315–327.

Dealbh Ghréine

1648.
Meek (Donald E.): The banners of the Fian in Gaelic ballad tradition.
In CMCS 11 (Summer, 1986), pp. 29–69.
[1.] Analogues of the banners in Germanic and other cultures; [2.] Banners in Irish tradition outside the fian; [3.] Banners associated with the fian; [4.] The banner quatrains in later tradition (incl. names of banners, e.g. Dealbh Ghréine, Fulang Doghra, Aoincheannach, Dún Naomhtha, Lámh Dhearg, Sguab Ghábhaidh, Lóch Luinneach); [5.] Form and composition of the BDL poem [see [6.]]; [6.] Edition (Poem beg. Naoinear a chuadhm[ar] fá choill, ed. from NLS MS Adv. 72.1.37 (Dean of Lismore’s Bk); with Engl transl. and notes). Figs.

deamhan

413.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Deamhan (?) agus deireadh an lae.
In Celtica 18 (1986), p. 192.
Read diún (as in MS) < *i ndiúin < *i niúin = *i neoin for deamhan in phrase `go raibh deamhan agus deireadh an lae ag teacht', in Éamon a Búrc: Scéalta, ed. by P. Ó Ceannabháin (1983), pp. 48, 70.
Ó Ceannabháin (Peadar) (ref.)

déan

11081.
Ó Baoill (Dónall), Ó Domhnalláin (Tomás): Réamhfhocail le briathra na Gaeilge.
Baile Átha Cliath: Institiúid Teangeolaíochta Éireann, 1975. 276 pp.
Studies the verbs bain, cuir, déan, gabh, lean, lig, tabhair, tar, téigh.
12732.
McManus (Damian): Varia: II. On the 2nd sg. subjunctive of do-ní in Classical Irish.
In Ériu 63 (2013), pp. 155–158.
On the long vowel form do-néis.

déan (as aux.)

17533.
Tristram (Hildegard L. C.): Do-periphrasis in Irish.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 367–376.
On the déan + VN construction in Modern Irish.

déana

1674.
McGonagle (Noel): The imperative forms déana/deana.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh, 1977–1978), pp. 203–207.

deana

1674.
McGonagle (Noel): The imperative forms déana/deana.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh, 1977–1978), pp. 203–207.

déanamh (as auxiliary verb)

11043.
Broderick (George): The imperfect and secondary future in late spoken Manx.
In SGS 28 (2011), pp. 307–332.
Examines the use of the imperfect and the secondary future of Late Spoken Manx in (1) the substantive verb, (2) the verb jannoo (used as an auxiliary), (3) the regular verb, and (4) the irregular, modal and defective verbs, offering a comparison with their use in Irish and Scottish Gaelic.

déanmhas

694.
Greene (David): Varia: IV. 1. feras, banas, and some related abstracts.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 155–167.
Studies the formation and meaning of abstract in -as.

déarann

1726.
McGonagle (Noel): The pres. fut. stem of the irregular verb.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh, 1978–1979), pp. 537–544.
[1.] béarann; [2.] bhéarann; [3.] déarann; [4.] g(h)eobhann, fuigheann; [5.] íosann; [6.] tiocann; [7.] rachann; [8.] tchífeann; [9.] dhéanann; [10.] béann.

dearg

1993.
Breeze (Andrew): Deorc ‘bloody’ in The dream of the rood: Old Irish derg ‘red, bloody’.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 165–168.
Argues that problematic OE deorc in The Dream of the Rood line 46 is best taken, on grounds the use of Ir. derg in later Irish texts, as a loan word from Irish thus meaning ‘bloody’, different from deorc ‘dark’ inherited from Germanic.
2358.
Mooney (B. J.): BUPNS reprints 22: The element ‘derg’ in certain place-names.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 199–202.
Aghaderg, Lenaderg, Derry.

Repr. from BUPNS 3/1 (Spring 1955), pp. 1-4.

deárlaí ‘the account of your sins at confession’

1794.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Notaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 128–135.
Trí fhocal Nua-Ghaeilge: 1. Céimseata. 2. *gutalach. 3. climseáil.

Cúig fhocal ón mBéarla: 1. Rucust / rigeist / rógoiste. 2.Stráisplé. 3. deárlaí. 4. Cleaimideighs. 5. Sifil, sifleálann.

Trí ghnáthleagan cainte ag an bPluincéadach: 1. Cuirim foaina chosaibh. 2. Cac ar aithris. 3. Dhá uillinn.

deasgabháil

7872.
Ó Broin (Brian): Old Irish *desgabál and the concept of ascension in Irish religious texts.
In PHCC 23 (2009), pp. 249–256.

debroth

12618.
Breatnach (Liam): ‘Saint Patrick’s oath’.
In Language and power in the Celtic world (2011), pp. 13–35.

déccain aindíaraid

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

deceddas (Og)

10041.
Motta (Filippo): Gall. δεκαντεν, pitt. Δεκανται, ant. irl. -De(i)chet.
In Fs. Szemerényi III (1993), pp. 293–303.

dechned

3120.
Kalyguine (Victor): Quelques aspectes mythologiques de la tradition grammaticale vieil-irlandaise.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 241–248.
Studies in particular the terms dechned, díchned, cennḟochrus, condáil, delidin.

*Dechrae

1311.
Byrne (F. J.): Monastica et onomastica.
In Peritia 2 (1983), pp. 261–264.
Identifies dat. sg. Deachraidh in poem, Triallom timcheall na Fódla by Seaán Mór Ó Dubhagáin, as the same element seen in Mag nDechrad (< *Dechrae), located adjacent to Donaghpatrick (Co. Meath).

Dechtir

2792.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 1. Die irische Tochter.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 92–94.
Argues that the Indo-European word for ‘daughter’ is continued by the OIr. personal name Dechtir, in pretonic position also Der (vel. sim).

dedail

819.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: I. 1. deibhil.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 185–186.
‘a period of calm during stormy weather at sea’ (Aran Islands) < deighil(t), OIr. dedail, vs. T. Ó Máille, in Éigse 9/3 (1960), p. 146 (BILL 2224).
Ó Máille (T. S.) (ref.)

dee

2748.
Rankin (David): Bendacht dee agus andee fort, a ingen (Táin bó Cúalgne 2111, O’Rahilly).
In ZCP 51 (1999), pp. 116–129.
Discusses in particular the term andee, arguing that it denotes not humans but supernatural beings.
11985.
Carey (John): Dee ‘pagan deity’.
In Ériu 62 (2012), pp. 33–42.
Suggests it is an early doublet of día, to which it supplies its plural forms.

dee {7} andee

2748.
Rankin (David): Bendacht dee agus andee fort, a ingen (Táin bó Cúalgne 2111, O’Rahilly).
In ZCP 51 (1999), pp. 116–129.
Discusses in particular the term andee, arguing that it denotes not humans but supernatural beings.

dee (nom. pl.)

17997.
Hoyne (Mícheál): Early Modern Irish miscellanea: 4. A rhyming example of nom. pl. dee ‘gods’ in Classical Modern Irish.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 183–186.

dëec

1238.
Schrijver (Peter): Varia: IV. OIr. dëec, dëac.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 181–184.
ad R. Hertz, in Lexis 4 (1955) 66-69. Derives dëec from *dechǣg (< PC *dekank < *deḱm-kwe ‘and ten’) with dissimilatory loss of *-ch- (or *-k-) before *-g-.

deibe

1282.
Isaac (G. R.): Varia: I. deibide.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 161–163.
On the terms rannaigecht ‘unitary-stanza-making’ and deibide ‘differentiated, disagreeing (form)', the latter representing a substantivised adjectival derivative from deibe ‘difference, variety, disagreement’ + adjectival de, vs. GOI §392, where it is suggested that deibide derives from de + bíthe ‘cut in two’.

deibhí (v. deibide)

1041.
Sproule (David): Complex alliteration, full and unstressed rhyme, and the origin of deibide.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 183–198.

deibhil

819.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: I. 1. deibhil.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 185–186.
‘a period of calm during stormy weather at sea’ (Aran Islands) < deighil(t), OIr. dedail, vs. T. Ó Máille, in Éigse 9/3 (1960), p. 146 (BILL 2224).
Ó Máille (T. S.) (ref.)

deibide

1282.
Isaac (G. R.): Varia: I. deibide.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 161–163.
On the terms rannaigecht ‘unitary-stanza-making’ and deibide ‘differentiated, disagreeing (form)', the latter representing a substantivised adjectival derivative from deibe ‘difference, variety, disagreement’ + adjectival de, vs. GOI §392, where it is suggested that deibide derives from de + bíthe ‘cut in two’.
1041.
Sproule (David): Complex alliteration, full and unstressed rhyme, and the origin of deibide.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 183–198.

Deichead

10041.
Motta (Filippo): Gall. δεκαντεν, pitt. Δεκανται, ant. irl. -De(i)chet.
In Fs. Szemerényi III (1993), pp. 293–303.

Deichet

10041.
Motta (Filippo): Gall. δεκαντεν, pitt. Δεκανται, ant. irl. -De(i)chet.
In Fs. Szemerényi III (1993), pp. 293–303.

deichned

2436.
Davies (Morgan Thomas): Protocols of reading in early Irish literature: notes on some notes to Orgain Denna Ríg and Amra Coluim Cille.
In CMCS 32 (Winter, 1996), pp. 1–23.
Reflects on the philological methodology followed by medieval and modern Irish scholars and the value of their observations, focusing on practical examples from these two texts.

Deichtine

2792.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 1. Die irische Tochter.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 92–94.
Argues that the Indo-European word for ‘daughter’ is continued by the OIr. personal name Dechtir, in pretonic position also Der (vel. sim).

déideadh

1856.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Dhá chomhfhocal liteartha sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 167–169.
[1.] déideadh; [2.] búirthé.

deighil(t)

819.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: I. 1. deibhil.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 185–186.
‘a period of calm during stormy weather at sea’ (Aran Islands) < deighil(t), OIr. dedail, vs. T. Ó Máille, in Éigse 9/3 (1960), p. 146 (BILL 2224).
Ó Máille (T. S.) (ref.)

deil chlis

11933.
Sayers (William): Warrior initiation and some short Celtic spears in the Irish and learned Latin traditions.
In SMRH 11 (1989), pp. 89–108.
Offers a detailed discussion of Cú Chulainn’s deil chlis..

deimindscne

12920.
Russell (Paul): Moth, toth, traeth: sex, gender and the early Irish grammarian.
In History of linguistics 1996 (1999), pp. 203–213.
Discusses the sets of terms for grammatical gender in Auraicept na n-éces.

de(i)n

18840.
Imhoff (Helen): DIL de(i)n: indeclinable?
In JCeltL 20 (Jan., 2019), pp. 61–98.
4399.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Dag(h)d(h)ae and his relatives.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 162–169.
Argues that maith, dag, Dag(dae), Danann (< *Danu), 2 donn ‘princely’, de(i)n are all members of a semantic field ‘good’, and dicusses its etymological connection with a similar semantic system in Italic.

deir

1575.
McGonagle (Noel): The present tense flexionless termination.
In Éigse 16/4 (Geimhreadh, 1976), pp. 275–283.
beir, bheir, cluin, ghní, deir, gheibh, tchí, ith, t(h)ig, t(h)éigh / t(h)éid.
2840.
Wigger (Arndt): Aspekte der Redewiedergabe im gesprochenen Irischen.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 965–999.
Studies, within a new typological frame, the role, forms and syntax of reported speech in Modern Irish, focusing in particular on deir/adeir, the most used verbum dicendi.

Deirdre

1153.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Lexical and literary aspects of ‘heart’ in Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 1–18.
1. Introduction; 2. Forms and declension of cride; 3. Sense of cride: 3.1 Primary sense: the physical heart; 3.2 Cride ‘centre, middle part, focus’ vs. medón and lár; 4. The heart as metaphor for courage; 5. The heart as seat and object of love: 5.1 Cnú and cride; 6. The heart as seat of emotions etc.; 7. ‘Heartbreak’ resulting in death: 7.1 General; 7.2 Deirdre; 7.3 Finnabair; 7.4 Donn Cúailnge; 7.5 Other instances; 8. Welsh parallels.
1879.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): Fionn and Deirdre in late medieval Wales.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 1–15.
1982.
Buttimer (Cornelius G.): Longes mac nUislenn reconsidered.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 1–41.
Analysis based on Deirdre’s role in LMU.
3488.
Evans (Dafydd Huw): Nodiadau amrywiol: [1.] Deirdre / Derdri.
In BBCS 31 (1984), p. 87.
Points out a further reference to Deirdre in Welsh verse.

déis

1188.
McCone (Kim): Varia: I. The etymology of Old Irish déis ‘client(s)'.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 193–197.
Derives from *dem- ‘house(hold)'; cf. dám ‘retinue (of clients)' < *domo- ‘house(hold)'.

déis ‘a vassal’

1789.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The Déisi and Dyfed.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 1–33.
Analysis of The expulsion of the Déisi; appendix includes the edition of a note on the Muinter Chairbre from Rawlinson MS B 502, with variant readings from Laud Misc. 610, and English translation.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 301-329.

Déisi

1789.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The Déisi and Dyfed.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 1–33.
Analysis of The expulsion of the Déisi; appendix includes the edition of a note on the Muinter Chairbre from Rawlinson MS B 502, with variant readings from Laud Misc. 610, and English translation.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 301-329.
5603.
O’Sullivan (Benedict): The Déci and others.
In Decies 29 (Summer, 1985), pp. 5–10.
5606.
Nolan (Tom): Twenty kings of Déisi.
In Decies 30 (Autumn, 1985), pp. 18–19.
5605.
O’Sullivan (Benedict): The Desii become Christian.
In Decies 30 (Autumn, 1985), pp. 4–9.

deisréad

1324.
Breeze (Andrew): Middle English daisser and Irish deisréad ‘sprinkler’.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 150–152.
Derives daisser ‘sprinkler’ (in MEngl. 13th c. poem) from Ir. deisréad < earlier int esríat ‘the sprinkler’.

delidin

3120.
Kalyguine (Victor): Quelques aspectes mythologiques de la tradition grammaticale vieil-irlandaise.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 241–248.
Studies in particular the terms dechned, díchned, cennḟochrus, condáil, delidin.

*dem-

1188.
McCone (Kim): Varia: I. The etymology of Old Irish déis ‘client(s)'.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 193–197.
Derives from *dem- ‘house(hold)'; cf. dám ‘retinue (of clients)' < *domo- ‘house(hold)'.

demhan

15855.
Ní Chrábhagáin (Ciara): Disease and illness in medieval Ireland: an anthropological examination of some hagiographical material.
In RíM 24 (2013), pp. 115–133.
Examines the usage of names of illnesses and diseases occurring in the text of Bethada náem nÉrenn: 1. amlabar, bacach, bodhar, clamhdall, lobhar; 2. aillse, fiolun fionn, easbadha, cuthach; scamach, lirach, moirtin marbh, bás obann, ifreann; esláinte theinntidhe, galar cos, demhan.

Démmán

4361.
Dumville (David N.): Gaelic and other Celtic names in the ninth-century ‘Northumbrian Liber Vitae': some issues and implications.
In SGS 22 (2006), pp. 1–25.
Identifies and discusses personal names of certain or arguable Irish origin (Abniar, Adamnan, Bressal, Brón, Denma, Dengus, Faelfi, Fergus, Finan, Fladgus, Reachtchriðe, Salfach, Ultan; Cuna, Cunen, Honoc, Maethcor, Mucca, Ona, Onboth).

Demne

2637.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): Heroic destinies in the macgnímrada of Finn and Cú Chulainn.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 23–39.
Outlines the common story pattern underlying the respective macgnímrada.

Demne Mael

324.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): Demne Mael.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 8–14.
The significance of mael in Finn’s original name of Demne Mael.

-den- (infixed pronoun)

823.
Kelly (Fergus): Varia: V. Addenddum to Varia: IV. 3, Ériu 31, 165-7.
In Ériu 34 (1983), p. 196.
ad F. O. Lindeman, in Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 165-167. Provides examples of the 3 sg. fem. infixed pronoun -den- from Audacht Morainn.
Lindeman (F. O.) (ref.)

Déngus

4361.
Dumville (David N.): Gaelic and other Celtic names in the ninth-century ‘Northumbrian Liber Vitae': some issues and implications.
In SGS 22 (2006), pp. 1–25.
Identifies and discusses personal names of certain or arguable Irish origin (Abniar, Adamnan, Bressal, Brón, Denma, Dengus, Faelfi, Fergus, Finan, Fladgus, Reachtchriðe, Salfach, Ultan; Cuna, Cunen, Honoc, Maethcor, Mucca, Ona, Onboth).

deoch

3199.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [2.] diod, ‘a drink’.
In BBCS 24/4 (May, 1972), pp. 481–482.
Also on Ir. deug (later deoch).

deog tonnaid

3676.
Nikolaeva (Natalia): The drink of death.
In StC 35 (2001), pp. 299–306.
On two kennings for blood in Old Irish: deog tonnaid, occurring 3× in Togail bruidne Da Derga, and melg theme, occurring 1×in Amrae Con Roi.

deogbaire

14020.
McLeod (Neil): Irish law and the wars of the Túatha Dé Danann.
In 14th ICCS, Maynooth 2011 (2015), pp. 75–94.
Elucidates passages in Cath Maige Tuired and Lebor gabála (concerning Bres’s fitness for kingship and the threefold taking of Ireland by the sons of Míl respectively) with the aid of concepts from early Irish law. In Appendix: deogbaire ‘cupbearer’ [on the resemblance between cupbearers and magicians seen in CMT §§77-80].

deogbore

14020.
McLeod (Neil): Irish law and the wars of the Túatha Dé Danann.
In 14th ICCS, Maynooth 2011 (2015), pp. 75–94.
Elucidates passages in Cath Maige Tuired and Lebor gabála (concerning Bres’s fitness for kingship and the threefold taking of Ireland by the sons of Míl respectively) with the aid of concepts from early Irish law. In Appendix: deogbaire ‘cupbearer’ [on the resemblance between cupbearers and magicians seen in CMT §§77-80].

deoir

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

deorad

759.
Ford (Patrick K.): Lám deoraid.
In ZCP 33 (1974), pp. 87–92.
ad V. Hull, in ZCP 18 (1930), pp. 70-71, 286 (Best2 297). Lám deoraid refers to status of person whose protection and rights under the law had been forfeited; such a person could be slain without fear of reprisal.

deòradh (ScG)

4313.
Gillies (William): Some thoughts on the toschederach.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 128–142.
Presents a detailed linguistic study of the name of this medieval Scottish officer, and suggests that it is to be derived from ScG toiseach daor-raith (cf. OIr. dóer-rath ‘base clientship’).

deorc (OE)

1993.
Breeze (Andrew): Deorc ‘bloody’ in The dream of the rood: Old Irish derg ‘red, bloody’.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 165–168.
Argues that problematic OE deorc in The Dream of the Rood line 46 is best taken, on grounds the use of Ir. derg in later Irish texts, as a loan word from Irish thus meaning ‘bloody’, different from deorc ‘dark’ inherited from Germanic.

Der

2792.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 1. Die irische Tochter.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 92–94.
Argues that the Indo-European word for ‘daughter’ is continued by the OIr. personal name Dechtir, in pretonic position also Der (vel. sim).
3794.
Hamp (Eric P.): Does morphological reconstruction really exist?
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 65–87.
Exposes the set of rules that govern Proto-Indo-European derivational patterns involving the prefix *h1su and the adjectival *-i, which is illustrated especially by examples of the several compounding types occurring with OIr. so-. In addition argues that the Old Irish negative prefix neb-/neph- derives from the petrified result of the prefix concatenation *ne-su- before a vowel.

der ‘daughter’

2792.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 1. Die irische Tochter.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 92–94.
Argues that the Indo-European word for ‘daughter’ is continued by the OIr. personal name Dechtir, in pretonic position also Der (vel. sim).
3794.
Hamp (Eric P.): Does morphological reconstruction really exist?
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 65–87.
Exposes the set of rules that govern Proto-Indo-European derivational patterns involving the prefix *h1su and the adjectival *-i, which is illustrated especially by examples of the several compounding types occurring with OIr. so-. In addition argues that the Old Irish negative prefix neb-/neph- derives from the petrified result of the prefix concatenation *ne-su- before a vowel.

derbḟine

1423.
McLeod (Neil): Kinship.
In Ériu 51 (2000), pp. 1–22.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] The gelḟine; [3.] The derbḟine; [4.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the íarfine; [5.] Additional kinship changes when ego’s grandsons come of age: the indḟine; [6.] Reckoning kinship by hand; [7.] Summary of proposed model; [8.] Problems with MacNeill’s model; [9.] The problem of the sprightly great-grandfathers; [10.] The problem of the indeterminate gelḟine; [11.] Subsequent modifications to MacNeill’s model; [12.] Supporting evidence: incl. discussion of the relationship between íarmue ‘great-grandson’ and íarfine, and between indue ‘great-great-grandson’ and indḟine; [13.] Conclusion: the basis of the kinship system was the three-generation gelḟine. vs. E. MacNeill, Celtic Ireland, 1921 (Best2 2136); D. Binchy, in PBA 29 (1943), p. 223; T. Charles-Edwards, Early Irish and Welsh kinship (Oxford, 1993); N. Patterson, in BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Binchy (D.) (ref.), Charles-Edwards (T.) (ref.), MacNeill (E.) (ref.), Patterson (N.) (ref.)
3515.
Patterson (Nerys W.): Patrilineal kinship in early Irish society: the evidence from the Irish law texts.
In BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Discusses the terms for the various kinship relations, in particular derbḟine.
3247.
Baumgarten (Rolf): The kindred metaphors in Bechbretha and Coibnes usci thairidne.
In Peritia 4 (1985), pp. 307–327.
On the use of the analogy of the four categories of kinship (gelḟine, derbḟine, íarfine, indḟine) applied to three cases of neighbourhood law: I. Bechbretha §§9-11, 18-22; II. Bechbretha §§12-13; III. Coibnes uisci thairidne §§1-3, 8. With linguistic discussion and English translation.

Appendix: ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 10 (1973), p. 80 §11 [Aithgabál bech].

derc

873.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. ON skiggsjá: OIr. scáterc ‘mirror’.
In Ériu 35 (1984), p. 195.
OIr. scáterc from scáth ‘shadow’ + derc ‘eye’.

Derc Corra

2470.
Carey (John): Two notes on names.
In Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 116–124.
1. Crimthann Nia Náir; 2. Derc Corra.

dercc

2470.
Carey (John): Two notes on names.
In Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 116–124.
1. Crimthann Nia Náir; 2. Derc Corra.

Dercinal (in William Worcestre)

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

derco

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

derco Chon

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

derco Duib

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Derco Maicnath

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

derco Maicnioth

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Dercomanath

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Dercongal

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

dercu

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Dercu Glasfhileth

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Dercu Glasfile

1983.
Byrne (Francis John): Dercu: the feminine of mocu.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 42–70.

Derdri (MW)

1879.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): Fionn and Deirdre in late medieval Wales.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 1–15.

derg

1993.
Breeze (Andrew): Deorc ‘bloody’ in The dream of the rood: Old Irish derg ‘red, bloody’.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 165–168.
Argues that problematic OE deorc in The Dream of the Rood line 46 is best taken, on grounds the use of Ir. derg in later Irish texts, as a loan word from Irish thus meaning ‘bloody’, different from deorc ‘dark’ inherited from Germanic.

derg dásachtach

13860.
Hayden (Deborah): On the meaning of two medieval Irish medical terms: derg dásachtach and rúad (fh)rasach.
In Ériu 64 (2014), pp. 1–21.
Argues, based on an analysis of Irish early medical sources, that these terms refer to blood vessels.

Derg Drúchtach

16341.
Pettit (Edward): Three variations on the theme of the dog-headed spear in medieval Irish: Celtchar’s lúin, Conall Cernach’s Derg Drúchtach, Lugaid’s flesc.
In StH 42 (2016), pp. 65–96.

dergfhine

3515.
Patterson (Nerys W.): Patrilineal kinship in early Irish society: the evidence from the Irish law texts.
In BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Discusses the terms for the various kinship relations, in particular derbḟine.

Derry

2358.
Mooney (B. J.): BUPNS reprints 22: The element ‘derg’ in certain place-names.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 199–202.
Aghaderg, Lenaderg, Derry.

Repr. from BUPNS 3/1 (Spring 1955), pp. 1-4.

Derrynaflan

2043.
Ní Chatháin (Próinséas): Derrynavlan.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 210.
11784.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Doire na bhFlann alias Doire Eidhneach: an historical and onomastic study.
In StH 20 (1980), pp. 111–139.

Derrynavlan

2043.
Ní Chatháin (Próinséas): Derrynavlan.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 210.

*de-saig

1991.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish con-dieig ‘asks, seeks’, verbal noun cuin(d)gid: a problem of syncope and verbal composition.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 156–159.
Argues that the verbal noun and the prototonic forms of con-dieig are historically irregular; shown to be a post-syncope compound of unattested *de-saig with com, on which the normal syncope pattern was applied. Also on Middle Irish simplification of old compound verbs.

desertum (Lat)

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

desgabál

7872.
Ó Broin (Brian): Old Irish *desgabál and the concept of ascension in Irish religious texts.
In PHCC 23 (2009), pp. 249–256.

dess

662.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 1. On the fundamental IE orientation.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 253–261.
Discusses the semantic change dess ‘south’ > ‘right’ and the etymology of Uisnech.
O’Brien (Michael A.) (ref.)

dessel

7655.
Haderlein (Konrad): Celtic roots: vernacular terminology and pagan ritual in Carlomann’s Draft Capitulary of A.D. 743, Codex Vat. Pal. Lat. 577.
In CJIS/RCÉI 18/2 (1992), pp. 1–29.
Analyses problematic readings in the Indiculus superstitionum et paganiorum, particularly dadsisas (leg. *dæsil) and nimidas which are compared with OIr. dessel and nemed respectively.

dét

11456.
Nikolaev (Alexander): Indo-European *dem(h2)- ‘to build’ and its derivatives.
In HS 123 (2010), pp. 56–96.

deug

3199.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [2.] diod, ‘a drink’.
In BBCS 24/4 (May, 1972), pp. 481–482.
Also on Ir. deug (later deoch).
3676.
Nikolaeva (Natalia): The drink of death.
In StC 35 (2001), pp. 299–306.
On two kennings for blood in Old Irish: deog tonnaid, occurring 3× in Togail bruidne Da Derga, and melg theme, occurring 1×in Amrae Con Roi.

Deveron

13607.
Breeze (Andrew): Ptolemy’s Taexali, Caelis, Loxa, and Eitis.
In ScotL 24 (2005), pp. 64–74.
[1.] Taexali; [2.] Caelis, the river Deveron; [3.] Loxa, the Lossie, and Welsh llosg ‘burning’; [4.] Eitis and Loch Etive.

devil

729.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Diabhal (deamhan 7 rl.) mar dheis chomhréire sa nGaeilge.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 46–58.
Diabhal, d(h)eamhan, damnú, daighean, etc. as syntactic devices. Discussion of use in Irish dialects and possible influence of English ‘devil’.

*dewz-á- (Germ)

1419.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: V. On a possible Celto-Germanic etymological correspondence.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 179–181.
Argues that MIr. doe, dae ‘a human being’ is a cognate of Germanic *dewz-á-.

dh

211.
Pődör (Dóra): The phonology of Scottish Gaelic loanwords in Lowland Scots.
In ScotL 14–15 (1995–1996), pp. 174–189.
1. Introduction; 2. Medial and final th [θ]; 3. Medial and final non-palatal dh [ð]; 4. Medial and final palatal dh [ðˊ]; 5. The stop shift; 6. The epenthetic vowel; [7.] Conclusion.

dh’a (ScG)

4274.
Breatnach (R. A.): Varia: 1. Latha ‘g an robh.
In SGS 14/2 (1986), pp. 142–143.
Discusses the substitution of ga for in the verbal noun construction.

dhá

4274.
Breatnach (R. A.): Varia: 1. Latha ‘g an robh.
In SGS 14/2 (1986), pp. 142–143.
Discusses the substitution of ga for in the verbal noun construction.

dhá chuid

1854.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 150–157.
I. Sé fhocal ón iasacht: 1. batam; 2. blámás/plámás; 3. gríscín; 4. leibhit, leibhiteáil; 5. strúsín; 6. treiscín.

II. Cúig leagan cainte: 1. dhá chuid; 2. dhá leath; 3. dhá leor; 4. duine agus duine; 5. m’athair agus iad .

dhá leath

1854.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 150–157.
I. Sé fhocal ón iasacht: 1. batam; 2. blámás/plámás; 3. gríscín; 4. leibhit, leibhiteáil; 5. strúsín; 6. treiscín.

II. Cúig leagan cainte: 1. dhá chuid; 2. dhá leath; 3. dhá leor; 4. duine agus duine; 5. m’athair agus iad .

dhá leor

1854.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 150–157.
I. Sé fhocal ón iasacht: 1. batam; 2. blámás/plámás; 3. gríscín; 4. leibhit, leibhiteáil; 5. strúsín; 6. treiscín.

II. Cúig leagan cainte: 1. dhá chuid; 2. dhá leath; 3. dhá leor; 4. duine agus duine; 5. m’athair agus iad .

dhá uillinn

1794.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Notaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 128–135.
Trí fhocal Nua-Ghaeilge: 1. Céimseata. 2. *gutalach. 3. climseáil.

Cúig fhocal ón mBéarla: 1. Rucust / rigeist / rógoiste. 2.Stráisplé. 3. deárlaí. 4. Cleaimideighs. 5. Sifil, sifleálann.

Trí ghnáthleagan cainte ag an bPluincéadach: 1. Cuirim foaina chosaibh. 2. Cac ar aithris. 3. Dhá uillinn.

d(h)eamhan

729.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Diabhal (deamhan 7 rl.) mar dheis chomhréire sa nGaeilge.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 46–58.
Diabhal, d(h)eamhan, damnú, daighean, etc. as syntactic devices. Discussion of use in Irish dialects and possible influence of English ‘devil’.

dhéanann

1726.
McGonagle (Noel): The pres. fut. stem of the irregular verb.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh, 1978–1979), pp. 537–544.
[1.] béarann; [2.] bhéarann; [3.] déarann; [4.] g(h)eobhann, fuigheann; [5.] íosann; [6.] tiocann; [7.] rachann; [8.] tchífeann; [9.] dhéanann; [10.] béann.

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.
9010.
Hamp (Eric P.): Oscan notes: 1. Oscan dat ‘dē', Old Irish dĕ-.
In AJPh 101/2 (Summer, 1980), pp. 190–191.

Di satur[n]

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

dia

2696.
Stefański (Witold): Der Konditionalsatz im Altirischen.
In ZCP 43 (1989), pp. 165–170.
Briefly describes the conjunctions and modi used in the construction of conditional sentences.
3787.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 4. “Der Götter und der Menschen” in Irland und in der Cisalpina.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 98–100.
Suggests that the Old Irish formula o dia na duine is a survival from early Celtic legal vocabulary.
2174.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí): Tongu do dia toinges mo thuath and related expressions.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [Fs. Carney] (1989), pp. 332–341.
Discusses the syntax, semantics and origin of early Irish oath formulae.
17997.
Hoyne (Mícheál): Early Modern Irish miscellanea: 4. A rhyming example of nom. pl. dee ‘gods’ in Classical Modern Irish.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 183–186.

día

11985.
Carey (John): Dee ‘pagan deity’.
In Ériu 62 (2012), pp. 33–42.
Suggests it is an early doublet of día, to which it supplies its plural forms.

dia ‘day’

2901.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia etymologica: 3. *dieu- ‘day’ in Celtic.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 472–477.
OIr. dia.

dia do bheatha

327.
Ó Cuív (Brian): The etymology of Dia do bheatha.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 27–42.

dia ocus duine

3787.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 4. “Der Götter und der Menschen” in Irland und in der Cisalpina.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 98–100.
Suggests that the Old Irish formula o dia na duine is a survival from early Celtic legal vocabulary.

diabhal

729.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Diabhal (deamhan 7 rl.) mar dheis chomhréire sa nGaeilge.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 46–58.
Diabhal, d(h)eamhan, damnú, daighean, etc. as syntactic devices. Discussion of use in Irish dialects and possible influence of English ‘devil’.

diad

805.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 1. Fer Diad.
In Ériu 33 (1982), p. 178.
‘Man / warrior of the pair’: diad related to dïas ‘two persons’. Also suggests i ndiaid may represent ‘in (its) pairing’ rather than ‘in(to) (its) end’ (cf. i ndiad).
10826.
Ó Flaithearta (Mícheál): The etymologies of (Fer) Diad.
In Ulidia 2 (2009), pp. 218–225.
Suggests diad in personal name (Fer) Diad derives from gen. *dwi-pod-os of PIE *dwi-pod-s ‘two-footed’.

diad (i ndiad)

805.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 1. Fer Diad.
In Ériu 33 (1982), p. 178.
‘Man / warrior of the pair’: diad related to dïas ‘two persons’. Also suggests i ndiaid may represent ‘in (its) pairing’ rather than ‘in(to) (its) end’ (cf. i ndiad).

diaid (i ndiaid)

805.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 1. Fer Diad.
In Ériu 33 (1982), p. 178.
‘Man / warrior of the pair’: diad related to dïas ‘two persons’. Also suggests i ndiaid may represent ‘in (its) pairing’ rather than ‘in(to) (its) end’ (cf. i ndiad).

diail

876.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 3. caidiail.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 197–198.
caidiail ‘sun-dial’ < caid ‘stone’ + diail (< Engl. ‘dial’).

Dían Cécht

1756.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (24–120).
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 1–35.
Continued from Éigse 18 (1981), pp. 183-209.

Dían Cécht

4586.
Gricourt (Daniel), Hollard (Dominique): Les dieux-héros médecins et bienfaiteurs dans les panthéons grec, celte et germanique.
In Ollodagos 15/1 (2001), pp. 7–95.
Investigates the rituals and attributes associated with the Gaulish healing divinity Bormo, and refers to his relationship with the Irish Óengus mac Óc, Dían Cécht and Lug, among others.

Diarmaid na nGall

1556.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Two notes: [2.] Diarmaid na nGall.
In Éigse 16/2 (Geimhreadh, 1975), pp. 136–144.
Diarmaid na nGall = Diarmaid Mac Murchadha; incl. discussion of the term Gall and its semantic development.

dïas

805.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 1. Fer Diad.
In Ériu 33 (1982), p. 178.
‘Man / warrior of the pair’: diad related to dïas ‘two persons’. Also suggests i ndiaid may represent ‘in (its) pairing’ rather than ‘in(to) (its) end’ (cf. i ndiad).

dias

10826.
Ó Flaithearta (Mícheál): The etymologies of (Fer) Diad.
In Ulidia 2 (2009), pp. 218–225.
Suggests diad in personal name (Fer) Diad derives from gen. *dwi-pod-os of PIE *dwi-pod-s ‘two-footed’.

dias ḟidchrann

3373.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Some cruxes in Críth gablach.
In Peritia 15 (2001), pp. 311–320.
[1.] eipit, dias ḟidchrann (ad CG §14.178); [2.] The render of an ócaire [tarr, tinne] (ad CG §10.109-111).

díbad

3515.
Patterson (Nerys W.): Patrilineal kinship in early Irish society: the evidence from the Irish law texts.
In BBCS 37 (1990), pp. 133–165.
Discusses the terms for the various kinship relations, in particular derbḟine.
13047.
Murray (Kevin): A Middle Irish tract on cró and díbad.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 251–260.
English translation of CIH ii 600.1-601.11 (cf. Ériu 1.209). With language notes, analysis [a discussion of the terms rann ó bun, cró ó inn, and cró ar medón] , and technical vocabulary.

díbairciud

7077.
Stifter (David): Varia: II. A rule for z-deletion in Irish?
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 159–164.
vs. GOI §218. Includes a discussion of the etymology of OIr. sochuide.

díberg

824.
McCone (Kim): Aided Cheltchair maic Uthechair: hounds, heroes and hospitallers in early Irish myth and story.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 1–30.
Includes an appendix on the principal divisions in early Irish social ideology, the four main classes being áes dána, díberga, briugaid, féni (flaithi / ríg).
718.
Sharpe (Richard): Hiberno-Latin laicus, Irish láech and the devil’s men.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 75–92.
Lat. laicus ‘layman’ introduced to Irel. and developed the rare subsidiary meaning ‘lay tenant’ in ecclesiastical context; laicus develops pagan connotations, hence ‘brigand’. In a separate line of development, Lat. laicus ‘layman’ borrowed into Ir. as láech at an early date primarily in legal texts; láech ‘warrior’ may have developed on the principle that ‘men’ are ‘warriors’ (see P. Mac Cana, ‘On the word láech “warrior” ', in Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 125-128); láech ‘warrior’ in turn influences Lat. laicus, which acquires the rare meaning ‘warrior’; láech ‘pagan’ occurs as a calque on laicus ‘pagan’.
Mac Cana (Proinsias) (ref.)
2839.
West (Máire): Aspects of díberg in the tale Togail bruidne Da Derga.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 950–964.
Explores general concepts about the early Irish institution of brigandage within the context of Togail bruidne Da Derga, with special attention to its association with wolflike activities, and argues that the tale conveys the Christian condemnation of díberg.
8602.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Gat and díberg in Togail bruidne Da Derga.
In Celtica helsingiensia (1996), pp. 203–213.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 412-421.
15912.
Breatnach (Liam): On Old Irish collective and abstract nouns, the meaning of cétmuinter, and marriage in early mediaeval Ireland.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 1–29.
I. Discusses the use of words to signify both an abstract concept and a person who embodies it, or both a collective and an individual member of the collective: cerd, dán, díberg, flaith, grád, nemed, ráth, naidm, aitire, cland, eclais, fine, muinter; II. The meaning of cétmuinter [Argues it meant ‘spouse’ and could be applied to both husband and wife].

díberga

824.
McCone (Kim): Aided Cheltchair maic Uthechair: hounds, heroes and hospitallers in early Irish myth and story.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 1–30.
Includes an appendix on the principal divisions in early Irish social ideology, the four main classes being áes dána, díberga, briugaid, féni (flaithi / ríg).
1654.
McCone (Kim R.): Werewolves, cyclopes, díberga, and Fíanna: juvenile delinquency in early Ireland.
In CMCS 12 (Winter, 1986), pp. 1–22.

díbirciud

9598.
Sayers (William): Games, sport and para-military exercise in early Ireland.
In Aethlon 10/1 (Fall, 1992), pp. 105–123.
Reviews D. Binchy's discussion (in Celtica 8.144) of the terms for games and sports named in Mellbretha: 1. lúb, líathróit; 2. corthe críche; 3. tochailt trebán; 4. lém; 5. snám; 6. sraenán; 7. brandub; 8. fidchell; 9. buanfach; 10. folach migán; 11. immarchor uanán; 12. ardchless co n-ublaib; 13. bocluasc; 14. echréim; 15. cor cloiche; 16. dréim; 17. léim; 18. díbirciud; 19. uathad fri hilar; 20. crosdibirciud; 21. táithe tuilche; 22. bundsach i n-airecht.

Appendix: A synthetic version of the lists of martial feats (cles) as found in the Ulster cycle of tales.

díchealtair

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

díchetal di chennaib

1208.
Carey (John): The three things required of a poet.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 41–58.
imbas forosnai, teinm laedo, díchetal di chennaib.

díchned

3120.
Kalyguine (Victor): Quelques aspectes mythologiques de la tradition grammaticale vieil-irlandaise.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 241–248.
Studies in particular the terms dechned, díchned, cennḟochrus, condáil, delidin.

dídin

821.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Varia: III. A note on Táin bó Regamna.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 189–193.
Emends dítin (IT ii l. 52 (diten YBL), l. 53 (ditin Eg. 1782)) to dídin, vn. of do-feid and translates Is oc dídin do báis-siu atáu-sa ocus bia as ‘I am and I shall be bringing about your death’.

Di-Dòmhnaich (ScG)

210.
Grannd (Seumas): The lexical geography of the Western Isles.
In ScotL 14–15 (1995–1996), pp. 52–65.
1. saucer (sàsar, flat); 2. hair (of the head) (gruag, falt); 3. oystercatcher (trìlleachan, brìdean); 4. smoke (from the chimney) (toit, ceò); 5. porridge (brochan, lite); 6. blue (of the sky) (liath, gorm); 7. grey (of hair) (glas, liath); 8. Sunday (Di-Dòmhnaich, Latha na Sàbaid) – all with corresponding maps.

die ‘day’

2901.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia etymologica: 3. *dieu- ‘day’ in Celtic.
In ÉtC 14 (1974–1975), pp. 472–477.
OIr. dia.

diei cetene

2051.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): An Old Irish gloss in the Munich Computus.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 289–290.
in MS Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek Clm 14456.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 131-132.

dies cetene

4143.
Bisagni (Jacopo), Warntjes (Immo): Latin and Old Irish in the Munich Computus: a reassessment and further evidence.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 1–33.
Offers an analysis of all the instances of code-switching in MS München, Clm 14456.

dies scrol

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

dígas

5106.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Old Irish heights and word-field potential.
In StH 24 (1984–1988), pp. 29–50.
OIr. ard, ardae, dígas, dígsa, mullach, slíab, tulach.

dígbál

765.
Greene (David): A recent semantic shift in Insular Celtic.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 43–59.
Discusses the semantic change (need >) lack > desire in (II) Irish (díth, dígbál (> mod. díobháil), feidhm, do-esta (> mod. teastuighidh), atá …ó, oireann …do, (III) Manx (laccal, feme), and (IV) Scottish Gaelic (tha …a dhìth air …, is e a tha bho …).

dígse

5106.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Old Irish heights and word-field potential.
In StH 24 (1984–1988), pp. 29–50.
OIr. ard, ardae, dígas, dígsa, mullach, slíab, tulach.

díguin

3578.
Meid (Wolfgang): Über konträre Bedeutung: Bemerkungen zum sogenannten ‘Gegensinn’.
In StC 14–15 (1979–1980), pp. 193–199.
Discusses examples from the Irish legal language: geis, smacht, díguin.

diic

799.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 1. lecc diice.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 161–163.
Lecc diice (duice, doice) (occurring in legal texts, such as Gúbretha Caratniad §15 and the legal commentary at CIH i 145.10-37, of which an English translation is given here) refers to ‘a physical defect which made a woman incapable of intercourse’; diice may, as suggested by R. Thurneysen (in ZCP 16 (1927), pp. 217-218 [Best2 2157]), represent do-ícce ‘incurability’ or, posssibly, an abstract based on diic, diing ‘difficult’.

diing

799.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 1. lecc diice.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 161–163.
Lecc diice (duice, doice) (occurring in legal texts, such as Gúbretha Caratniad §15 and the legal commentary at CIH i 145.10-37, of which an English translation is given here) refers to ‘a physical defect which made a woman incapable of intercourse’; diice may, as suggested by R. Thurneysen (in ZCP 16 (1927), pp. 217-218 [Best2 2157]), represent do-ícce ‘incurability’ or, posssibly, an abstract based on diic, diing ‘difficult’.

dil: -ḟir (in rime)

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.

dìleas (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

dìlseachd (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

dílsem

2407.
Stacey (Robin Chapman): Ties that bind: immunities in Irish and Welsh law.
In CMCS 20 (Winter, 1990), pp. 39–60.
On the protection of transactions against claims in Ir. contractual law. Apps. contain details on (I) natural entitlement, (II) unwarranted promises, and (III) the aire coisring.

dilus

8393.
Ó Néill (Pádraig): The earliest dry-point glosses in Codex Usserianus Primus.
In Fs. O’Sullivan (1998), pp. 1–28.
Includes three glosses in Irish: 32. focrici, 69. oen and 79. dilus.

Add. et corr. in Peritia 14 (2000), pp. 430-431.

Dímóc

7642.
Ó Crualaoich (Conchubhar): Shemoge’s and St. Awarie’s: one case of mistaken identity and one case of sharp intuition?
In The past 27 (2006), pp. 39–49.
On the origin of Díomóg/Modhíomóg of Cluain Caoin Ara and on the Co, Wexford place names St. Imoge or Shemoge, St. Awaries and Lady’s Island.

*-din-

900.
Joseph (Lionel S.): A survival from the Italo-Celtic legal vocabulary.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 119–125.
OIr. líthech ‘accused person’ (cf. liïd ‘accuses’) and Lat. lı̄s, lı̄tis ‘lawsuit’; also OIr. ad ‘law’, adae ‘due, fitting, proper’, adas ‘suitable, appropriate to’ and Umbrian arsie ‘sancte’, etc; OIr. coll ‘injury, violation’ and Lat. culpa ‘blame’; cf. *-din- in trédenus ‘three days’ and Lat. nundinum ‘nine days’.

Dínertach

780.
Ó Coileáin (Seán): Some problems of story and history.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 115–136.
The relationship of story to history as exemplified in a number of texts relating to Guaire Aidni: [1.] Introduction; [2.] Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin; [3.] The question of Dínertach.

Dingle

6413.
MacCotter (Paul): An Daingean and Dingle: what’s in a name?
In JKAHS (2nd ser.) 6 (2006), pp. 89–97.

dinnshenchas

2276.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Dinnshenchas: the literary exploitation of Irish place-names.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 90–106.

díobháil

765.
Greene (David): A recent semantic shift in Insular Celtic.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 43–59.
Discusses the semantic change (need >) lack > desire in (II) Irish (díth, dígbál (> mod. díobháil), feidhm, do-esta (> mod. teastuighidh), atá …ó, oireann …do, (III) Manx (laccal, feme), and (IV) Scottish Gaelic (tha …a dhìth air …, is e a tha bho …).

diog

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

díograis

7968.
McQuillan (Peter): Díograis in Aisling Aogáin Uí Rathaille.
In ECI 23 (2008), pp. 121–141.

diol

861.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 2. Sg. 69a9.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 163–164.
Lat. lodix glossed with Ir. sléic (means ‘pumice’, possibly related to slíachtaid ‘smoothes’), ruamnae (earlier form of rúamna ‘colouring matter, redish colour’), diol (‘fillet, diadem’): all exx. of ornamentum muliebre. Also suggests Ir. slíogadh ‘smoothing, polishing’ derives from ON slíkja ‘to smoothe’, although slíocadh forms may have been influenced by Engl. slick ‘to slick, polish, smooth’.

Díomóg

7642.
Ó Crualaoich (Conchubhar): Shemoge’s and St. Awarie’s: one case of mistaken identity and one case of sharp intuition?
In The past 27 (2006), pp. 39–49.
On the origin of Díomóg/Modhíomóg of Cluain Caoin Ara and on the Co, Wexford place names St. Imoge or Shemoge, St. Awaries and Lady’s Island.

diór

2614.
Scott (B. G.): Goldworking terms in early Irish writings.
In ZCP 38 (1981), pp. 242–254.
Investigates the meaning of several compounds and expressions containing OIr. ór.

dior

2614.
Scott (B. G.): Goldworking terms in early Irish writings.
In ZCP 38 (1981), pp. 242–254.
Investigates the meaning of several compounds and expressions containing OIr. ór.

díor

2614.
Scott (B. G.): Goldworking terms in early Irish writings.
In ZCP 38 (1981), pp. 242–254.
Investigates the meaning of several compounds and expressions containing OIr. ór.

diphthongs

678.
Greene (David): The diphthongs of Old Irish.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 26–45.
Primitive Irish: 1. Reduction of hiatus; 2. The u-infection of a; 3. The u-infection of penultimate syllables. Archaic Irish: 1. Reflexes of new final consonants; 2. Reduction of hiatus; 3. Coalescence of preverbs; 4. Compensatory lengthening. Early Old Irish: 1. Syncope of vowels in post-tonic syllables; 2. Composite forms; 3. Loss of intervocalic -w-; 4. The shift to rising diphthongs. Old Irish: 1. The short diphthongs; 2. The long diphthongs; 3. Reduction of hiatus. Conclusion.

dirdum (ModEngl)

1271.
Breeze (Andrew): Middle Irish dordán ‘buzz, roar’: Northern English dirdum ‘uproar, din’.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 205–207.
ModEngl. dirdum < MEngl. durdan < Ir. dordán.

dìrid (ScG)

3713.
Lockwood (W. B.): Ptarmigan and other Gaelic names.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn, 1976), pp. 271–278.
Bird-names: Engl. ptarmigan (< ScG tarmachan), tairmid, stearnal, amhas, asaileag, buigeir, dìrid.

díseart (in place names)

14040.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Placenames and early settlement in County Donegal.
In Donegal history and society (1995), pp. 149–182.
Cinéal Eoghain and Inis Eoghain; Cinéal Conaill and Tír Chonaill; Cinéal Éanna and Tír Éanna; Cinéal Luighdheach and Tír Luighdheach; Cinéal Baghaine and Tír Baghaine; Tír Ainmhireach; Tír Aodha; Dún na nGall/Donegal; Early Christian settlement names [cluain; tulach]; Secular habitation sites as ecclesiastical sites [ráth]; Generic ecclesiastical settlement terms: domhnach; díseart; teach; cill.
14085.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Early ecclesiastical settlement names of county Galway.
In Galway history and society (1996), p. 795.
On the terms domnach, cluain, eanach, tuaim, teach, díseart, cill, both, as elements in placenames.

Díseart Diarmada

8681.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 20–25, 23–25, 57–61, 61–62, 97–99, 129–131.
1. Tullyvin. 2. Bunclody. 3. Dromiskin. 4. Nóta breise faoi Dhíseart Diarmada. 5. Carrigaholt. 6. Ballon.
8686.
Dodgson (John McNeal): Tristel- in the placename Castledermot.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 47–51.

dísert

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

-dís(t) (3 pl.)

898.
McGonagle (Noel): Migration of verbal terminations.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 93–97.
On the analogical spread of certain verbal endings, some of which gain independent pronominal status, e.g. -(e)as (1 sg.); -(a)is, -(a)inns, -(a)ir, -, -f(a)í (2 sg.); (-)mar, -(e)amuid, -muis(t) (1 pl.); (-)dar, -(a)id, -dís(t) (3 pl.); -f(e)á, -tf(a)í (impers.); -f(e)ar, -(e)adh, -(e)as (impers.) with irregular verbs; -t(e)ars, -th(e)ars, -f(e)ars (impers.).

díth

765.
Greene (David): A recent semantic shift in Insular Celtic.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 43–59.
Discusses the semantic change (need >) lack > desire in (II) Irish (díth, dígbál (> mod. díobháil), feidhm, do-esta (> mod. teastuighidh), atá …ó, oireann …do, (III) Manx (laccal, feme), and (IV) Scottish Gaelic (tha …a dhìth air …, is e a tha bho …).
3088.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 45. Ir. díth.
In ÉtC 27 (1990), p. 183.
ad D. Greene, in ZCP 34 (1975), p. 48. Proposes a derivation from *dē-(p)et-o-m (root *pet- ‘fall’).
2764.
Mikhailova (Tatiana), Nikolaeva (Natalia): The denotations of death in Goidelic: to the question of Celtic eschatological conceptions.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 93–115.
Studies the etymology and semantics of Irish expressions denoting ‘death’ as occurring in the texts, with the aim of retrieving the Celtic attitudes towards death.

dìthean (ScG)

4315.
Grannd (Seumas): Lexical geography of the Western Isles.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 146–149.
Discusses the distribution of the various words used for ‘flower’: flùr, dìthean and sìthean.

díthech

3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

díthir (Inis Eoghain)

2055.
McGonagle (Noel): Tá rud éigin a cheithre orm.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 299–303.
Ceithre 'need etc.' in E. Ul. idiom tá rud éigin a cheithre orm < ciorrbhadh 'cutting off, cutting short’.

dítin

821.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Varia: III. A note on Táin bó Regamna.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 189–193.
Emends dítin (IT ii l. 52 (diten YBL), l. 53 (ditin Eg. 1782)) to dídin, vn. of do-feid and translates Is oc dídin do báis-siu atáu-sa ocus bia as ‘I am and I shall be bringing about your death’.

dítiu

3297.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 6. An ancient Indo-European idiom.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 172–174.
On the semantic development of do ·eim (v. n. dítiu) from ‘grasps together’ to ‘protects’.
3466.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 4. Two Celtic reflexes of *i̯em-.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 146–147.
ad E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 172-74. On do ·em, dítiu, and compounds of -em.

díu

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

Diu ethamon

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

Diu iath

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

Diu luna

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

Diu mart

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

Diu triach

779.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 95–114.
Transcription and discussion of list of early stratum of Irish days of the week from MS Oxford, St. John’s College 17 with accompanying plate: dies scrol, Diu luna, Diu mart, Diu iath, Diu ethamon, Diu triach, Di satur[n]. Some discussion of archaic OIr. form díu ‘day’. Suggests these names could be as old as the 6th c. Appendix: poem beg. Secht meic áille Oéngusa (9 qq.), ed. from the Book of Leinster with English translation and notes.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 7-27.

diúch (ghost word)

1251.
Ua Súilleabháin (Seán): Glac bheag focal.
In Éigse 33 (2002), pp. 173–178.
1. airchisín (Pluincéad); 2. miúndáil/meanndáil/miondáil; 3. aillbhil (Pluincéad); 4. ghiúch/giúch/iúch/ (?) dhiúch/ (?) diúch; 5. creithinisí/cleathainisí/greathainisí, creathnais.

díuchtra

838.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 1. Old Irish do-fochtra, díuchtra.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 203–204.

diúltaigh

7669.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Of unknown [?] origin.
In SAP 21 (1988), pp. 69–73.
Engl. jilt, twig < Ir. diúltaigh, tuig.

diún

413.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Deamhan (?) agus deireadh an lae.
In Celtica 18 (1986), p. 192.
Read diún (as in MS) < *i ndiúin < *i niúin = *i neoin for deamhan in phrase `go raibh deamhan agus deireadh an lae ag teacht', in Éamon a Búrc: Scéalta, ed. by P. Ó Ceannabháin (1983), pp. 48, 70.
Ó Ceannabháin (Peadar) (ref.)

diupart

2628.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Indo-European roots *bher- in the light of Celtic and Albanian.
In ZCP 39 (1982), pp. 205–218.
Discusses berid, ad-opair, fúabair and related forms.

dleasdanach (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

dliged

1004.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): Dliged: its native and latinate usages.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 65–78.
1. Exegesis; 2. Arithmetic and the Paschal Computus; 3. Grammar. Suggests how a dictionary entry for dliged, restricted to Old Irish examples, distinguishing between native and Latinate usages, might be set out (pp. 75-78).
10807.
Boyle (Elizabeth): Neoplatonic thought in medieval Ireland: the evidence of Scéla na esérgi.
In Medium ævum 78/2 (2009), pp. 216–230.
With a study of the author’s philosophical vocabulary, focusing on the terms dliged, folud, aicned, umallóit, teorfegad.
11827.
Bemmer (Jaqueline): Validity and equality in early Irish contract law: dliged and cert in the light of Cóic conara fugill.
In SCF 8 (2011), pp. 5–18.

dligheach (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

dlomass

4151.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: 2. An instance of do-maisi in the Irish Gospel of Thomas.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 160–161.
ad Gospel of Thomas, q. 21 (as. ed. by J. Carney 1964 [BILL 2778]). Rejects previous emendations and interprets MS domais as the 3rd sg. deut. pret. rel. of do-maisi ‘concocts’.

dluigid

799.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 1. lecc diice.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 161–163.
Lecc diice (duice, doice) (occurring in legal texts, such as Gúbretha Caratniad §15 and the legal commentary at CIH i 145.10-37, of which an English translation is given here) refers to ‘a physical defect which made a woman incapable of intercourse’; diice may, as suggested by R. Thurneysen (in ZCP 16 (1927), pp. 217-218 [Best2 2157]), represent do-ícce ‘incurability’ or, posssibly, an abstract based on diic, diing ‘difficult’.

dlúth

3337.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 13. dlŭth.
In Ériu 25 (1974), p. 284.
ad M. A. O’Brien, in Celtica 3 (1956), pp. 177-178 (BILL 1825). On the analogical shortening of ú in dlúth.

do

1341.
Mac Gill’Ìosa (Uilleam): Mo chreach-sa chàinig.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 45–59.
Argues that so replaces do as a preverbal particle; evidence mainly from verse texts dated to seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.
8165.
Stüber (Karin): Der altirische do-Infinitiv: eine verkannte Kategorie.
MFhS, 8. Bremen: Hempen, 2009. x + 164 pp.
Rev. by
Joseph F. Eska, in Kratylos 56 (2011), pp. 207-210.
Patricia Ronan, in ZCP 58 (2011), pp. 329-331.
2564.
Genee (Inge): Pragmatic aspects of verbal noun complements in Early Irish: do + VN in the Würzburg glosses.
In JCeltL 3 (May, 1994), pp. 41–73.

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

do-

3014.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 5. Das altirische Verbalpräfix nu/no.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 35–59.
Criticises the doctrine that links Old Irish preverbs no-, to/do- with the Hittite ‘sentence connectives’ and proposes alternative etymologies based on their Basque and Amazigh typological parallels, among others.
1406.
Eska (Joseph F.): On the prehistory of OIr. do-, MW dy-, etc.
In IJDL 4/2 (2007), pp. 185–206.

do (+ agent)

331.
Williams (J. E. Caerwyn): Remarks on a linguistic drift.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 67–82.
On the use of the preposition do to indicate the agent of verbal nouns and related matters; compares and contrasts Welsh i (y).

do·beir

2691.
Rosén (Hannah): Periphrasis and figura etymologica in some sources of Middle Irish.
In ZCP 43 (1989), pp. 53–83.
Examines the various syntactical patterns in which the figura etymologica is attested, and argues that in the type where the verbal noun is the topic of a cleft sentence the cognate finite verb lost its lexical prominence and gave way to an auxiliary verb, thus facilitating the proliferation of the periphrastical construction with do·gní, do·beir, fo·ceird, etc.

do donnoe (=later form; < *dodan-oí‘bore’)

638.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. On a possible Celtic-Greek etymological correspondence.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 165–166.
On the preterite forms *-taí (-táe) /*-toí (-tóe) and *dodan-oí (for later form do donnoe), all meaning ‘bore’. Also discusses unrelated toud (‘to bring forth (offspring)).

do·gní

2691.
Rosén (Hannah): Periphrasis and figura etymologica in some sources of Middle Irish.
In ZCP 43 (1989), pp. 53–83.
Examines the various syntactical patterns in which the figura etymologica is attested, and argues that in the type where the verbal noun is the topic of a cleft sentence the cognate finite verb lost its lexical prominence and gave way to an auxiliary verb, thus facilitating the proliferation of the periphrastical construction with do·gní, do·beir, fo·ceird, etc.

*do (participial)

1069.
Hamp (Eric P.): Traces of participial *do in Celtic.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 113–117.

do (prep.)

754.
Evans (D. Ellis): Gaulish dugiiontiio or dugiionti to?
In ZCP 33 (1974), pp. 19–22.
Speculates on the possibility that RIG L-4 may attest a Continental Celtic preposition to.

*do-airet

801.
Byrne (Francis John): Varia: III. 1. *do-airet.
In Ériu 33 (1982), p. 167.
Ní-s tairchet ‘he cannot conduct them’ (CGH 93).

do-airicc

4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.

do-airngair

4162.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: VII. 2. do-airngair.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 192–193.
855.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: VII. 1. OIr. toined, tóiniud.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 191–193.

do-beir

639.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: II. On some Celtic compound verb forms.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 167–170.
On the lack of lenition following preverbs originally ending in a vowel ‘in loose composition’ in Old Irish verbs such as do-beir, fo-cain, fo-ceil. Cf. the author’s Addendum ad Études celtiques XV, 495ff, in ÉtC 23 (1986), pp. 58-61.
4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.
9753.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish do·uccai, do·ratai.
In GS Schindler (1999), pp. 355–364.
Argues that do·uccai derives from an old causative *h2/3ōnḱ-ye/o- to the PIE ‘Narten’ present *h2/3ḗnḱ-ti, *h2/3énḱ-n̥ti, and that do·ratai is an old primary verb (< *deh3- ‘give’) absorbed into the weak a-class.

do-bidci (do-rubidc, do-robidc)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

dobrán

3613.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): Otter, salmon and eel in traditional Gaelic narrative.
In StC 20–21 (1985–1986), pp. 123–144.
Suggests that these water creatures have similar and overlapping functions as conduits of otherworldly power, wisdom and madness.

dobur

9423.
Tovar (Antonio): Tradición e innovación en el léxico céltico: algunas etimologías.
In O-o-pe-ro-si [Fs. Risch] (1986), pp. 684–689.
[1.] ‘cuello’; [2.] ‘cuerno’; [3.] ‘sueño’, ‘dormir’; [4.] ‘agua’.
7086.
Hamp (Eric P.): Keltic dubro- ‘water’: the story of a lexeme.
In Fs. Trager (1972), pp. 233–237.
OIr. dobur.

doburchú

3613.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): Otter, salmon and eel in traditional Gaelic narrative.
In StC 20–21 (1985–1986), pp. 123–144.
Suggests that these water creatures have similar and overlapping functions as conduits of otherworldly power, wisdom and madness.

Dochiaróg

6091.
Muhr (Kay): Dochiaróg, Mag Enir and Leth Cam.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 131–143.
Discusses evidence from the annals for two Airgialla place names.

do-chluinim óna lán do dhaoinibh

908.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Varia: VII. The two herons of Druim Ceat.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 194–196.
As related by Keating in his Foras Feasa ar Éirinn. In this case, the phrase do-chluinim óna lán do dhaoinibh is not evidence of Keating’s use of oral sources but rather his way conveying the hearsay element of earlier tradition.

do-chuaidh

3798.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): Modern Irish fuaidh.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 160–165.
Calls attention to the variant paradigm in fua- attested in Modern Irish for the past tense of téigh, and argues that this, along with the paradigm in chá- (cf. bardic cháidh and ScG chaidh), results from the blending of synonymous ro-fáith and do-chuaidh.

dochum

2684.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III. Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 3. Non-classical forms in bardic poetry.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 152–159.
ad-bheir, do-ghní, ro-d fia (= OIr. rot-bia), aill in feacht n-aill (= OIr. neut. aill), dochum/chum, beidid (< MIr. beitit), roimhl.

do-cing (tochus)

1065.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Three notes on Cath Maige Tuired.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 61–68.
1. An unnecessary emendation (vs. W. Stokes's emendation of snidhfed to sn[a]idh[m]fed, in RC 12 (1891), pp. 306-08 (§14), reproduced in E. A. Gray, Cath Maige Tuired (1982); also discussion of the theme of womenfolk’s intervention in political affairs); 2. OIr. -tochus (Interprets MS toc̄sa (§67) as tochus, prototonic fut. 1 sg. of do-cing ‘steps, strides forward; advances, comes’); 3. A redactorial intrusion [in §69].
Gray (E. A.) (ref.), Stokes (W.) (ref.)

do-coissin

2823.
Ó Corráin (Ailbhe): On the syntax and semantics of expressions of being in Early Irish.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 629–642.
Provides an analysis within the framework of case grammar of this range of expressions – excluding the copula and the substantive verb– along with other stative concepts expressing cognition, perception and possession, and postulates a common underlying syntactic structure where the logical subject is expressed in the locative case.

*dodan-oí (> do donnoe (= later form)‘bore’)

638.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. On a possible Celtic-Greek etymological correspondence.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 165–166.
On the preterite forms *-taí (-táe) /*-toí (-tóe) and *dodan-oí (for later form do donnoe), all meaning ‘bore’. Also discusses unrelated toud (‘to bring forth (offspring)).

do-dímen

10522.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On the origin of the Old Irish present -men ‘fixes’.
In ZCP 58 (2011), pp. 45–54.
On the reconstruction of the Common Celtic present indicative stems underlying OIr. do-dímen and sernaid.

do-doichbí

1218.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: II. Notae Mediolanenses.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 267–272.
[1.] Ml. 39d7 [nad-fendar]; [2.] Ml. 28b6 [todoichfet], 39d26 [dun-doichfia] deriving from *to-doich-, associated by folk etymology with doich ‘perhaps, probably’.

doe

1419.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: V. On a possible Celto-Germanic etymological correspondence.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 179–181.
Argues that MIr. doe, dae ‘a human being’ is a cognate of Germanic *dewz-á-.

doé

11947.
Sayers (William): The ancestry of John Doe: a squib.
In Eolas 5 (2011), pp. 193–198.
Considers a link between OIr. doé ‘human being’ and the English legal fiction John Doe.

do ·eim

3297.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 6. An ancient Indo-European idiom.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 172–174.
On the semantic development of do ·eim (v. n. dítiu) from ‘grasps together’ to ‘protects’.

dóel

2303.
Sayers (William): Vífill: captive Gael, freeman settler, Icelandic forbear.
In Ainm 6 (1994), pp. 46–55.
Suggests it is a calque on an Irish name containing dóel or cíar.
15995.
Zhivlova (Nina): Rare and unique names of ‘non-Indo-European’ type and the case of Dallán Forgaill.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 7 (2015), pp. 149–162.
Discusses the name elements becc/bécc, cáech, dóel, túaim; includes an excursus on Dallán Forgaill.

do ·em

3466.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 4. Two Celtic reflexes of *i̯em-.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 146–147.
ad E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 172-74. On do ·em, dítiu, and compounds of -em.

doendai

6689.
Bourke (Cormac): The work of angels?
In IR 50/1 (Spring, 1999), pp. 76–79.
ad AU 1007.11: doendai ‘man-made’.

dóer-rath

4313.
Gillies (William): Some thoughts on the toschederach.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 128–142.
Presents a detailed linguistic study of the name of this medieval Scottish officer, and suggests that it is to be derived from ScG toiseach daor-raith (cf. OIr. dóer-rath ‘base clientship’).

doérrathaig

1592.
Quin (E. G.): The early Irish poem Ísucán.
In CMCS 1 (Summer, 1981), pp. 39–52.
Poem beg. Ísucán / alar limm im dísertán, ed. with English translation and notes from MSS RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), Brussels 5100–04, RIA 23 P 2 (Book of Lecan), Franciscan A 7, Laud Misc. 610, RIA 23 P 3. Emphasises legal force of the text, with discussion of legal metaphors and terms such as ernaid, sochor, doérrathaig.

do-esta

765.
Greene (David): A recent semantic shift in Insular Celtic.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 43–59.
Discusses the semantic change (need >) lack > desire in (II) Irish (díth, dígbál (> mod. díobháil), feidhm, do-esta (> mod. teastuighidh), atá …ó, oireann …do, (III) Manx (laccal, feme), and (IV) Scottish Gaelic (tha …a dhìth air …, is e a tha bho …).

do ·fāisce

3460.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 3. *sekw- ‘pronounce, speak’.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 171–174.
(a) *fo ·aisci, do ·fāisce: ad J. Carney's discussion of fásc ‘announcement’ and tásc ‘tidings received’, in Ériu 18 (1958), p. 34 (cf. BILL 5527); (b) tinchosc, tecosc: more on derivatives of sechid, including écosc; (c) sich ‘said’: ad J. Carney, ibid., p. 14 §13c, read sích.

do-feid

821.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Varia: III. A note on Táin bó Regamna.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 189–193.
Emends dítin (IT ii l. 52 (diten YBL), l. 53 (ditin Eg. 1782)) to dídin, vn. of do-feid and translates Is oc dídin do báis-siu atáu-sa ocus bia as ‘I am and I shall be bringing about your death’.

do-feotar

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

do-fíuchtra

838.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 1. Old Irish do-fochtra, díuchtra.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 203–204.

do-fiunmell

8534.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): A phonological note on OIr. -tuinmell.
In Celtica 26 (2010), pp. 44–47.
ad R. Thurneysen, in ZCP 16 (1927), p. 275 [7. Zu air. -tuinmell]; argues it may reflect Class. OIr. *-toínmell.

do-fochtra

838.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 1. Old Irish do-fochtra, díuchtra.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 203–204.

do-fótar

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

do-fúaid

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

do-fúatar

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

do-ghní

2684.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III. Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 3. Non-classical forms in bardic poetry.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 152–159.
ad-bheir, do-ghní, ro-d fia (= OIr. rot-bia), aill in feacht n-aill (= OIr. neut. aill), dochum/chum, beidid (< MIr. beitit), roimhl.

do-gní

12732.
McManus (Damian): Varia: II. On the 2nd sg. subjunctive of do-ní in Classical Irish.
In Ériu 63 (2013), pp. 155–158.
On the long vowel form do-néis.

do ·goa

3042.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 25. Notes on word formation: 3. Irish gu(s) ‘to choose’.
In ÉtC 23 (1986), pp. 48–49.
Comments on the nominal formations from this verbal stem.

dohicce

799.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 1. lecc diice.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 161–163.
Lecc diice (duice, doice) (occurring in legal texts, such as Gúbretha Caratniad §15 and the legal commentary at CIH i 145.10-37, of which an English translation is given here) refers to ‘a physical defect which made a woman incapable of intercourse’; diice may, as suggested by R. Thurneysen (in ZCP 16 (1927), pp. 217-218 [Best2 2157]), represent do-ícce ‘incurability’ or, posssibly, an abstract based on diic, diing ‘difficult’.

do-icc

4661.
Jasanoff (Jay H.): Old Irish tair ‘come!'.
In TPhS 84/1 (Nov., 1986), pp. 132–141.

do-ícce

799.
Greene (David): Varia: I. 1. lecc diice.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 161–163.
Lecc diice (duice, doice) (occurring in legal texts, such as Gúbretha Caratniad §15 and the legal commentary at CIH i 145.10-37, of which an English translation is given here) refers to ‘a physical defect which made a woman incapable of intercourse’; diice may, as suggested by R. Thurneysen (in ZCP 16 (1927), pp. 217-218 [Best2 2157]), represent do-ícce ‘incurability’ or, posssibly, an abstract based on diic, diing ‘difficult’.

doich

1218.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: II. Notae Mediolanenses.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 267–272.
[1.] Ml. 39d7 [nad-fendar]; [2.] Ml. 28b6 [todoichfet], 39d26 [dun-doichfia] deriving from *to-doich-, associated by folk etymology with doich ‘perhaps, probably’.

-dóid

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

dóig

3747.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 5. dóig ám.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 195–196.
ad DIL D, 304.17-24, where the phrase dóig ám ‘for, because’ (< Middle Irish conjunction dáig + emphasizing particle ám) is erroneously given under the adjective dóig.

dóig ám

3747.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 5. dóig ám.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 195–196.
ad DIL D, 304.17-24, where the phrase dóig ám ‘for, because’ (< Middle Irish conjunction dáig + emphasizing particle ám) is erroneously given under the adjective dóig.

doilghe

3417.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Three notes: 2. doiligh, doilghe.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 2–4.
Phonological convergence of adjective (doiligh) and abstract noun (doilghe).

doiligh

3417.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Three notes: 2. doiligh, doilghe.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 2–4.
Phonological convergence of adjective (doiligh) and abstract noun (doilghe).
11723.
Breeze (Andrew): Doolie ‘grievous’ in the Testament of Cresseid.
In N&Q 57/2 (Jun., 2010), pp. 195–196.
< Ir. doiligh.

*do-inchosaig

3646.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On the origin of Welsh dangosaf, dangos.
In StC 28 (1994), pp. 178–179.
Compared to OIr. *do-inchosaig.

Doire Eidhneach

11784.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Doire na bhFlann alias Doire Eidhneach: an historical and onomastic study.
In StH 20 (1980), pp. 111–139.

Doire na bhFlann

2043.
Ní Chatháin (Próinséas): Derrynavlan.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 210.
11784.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Doire na bhFlann alias Doire Eidhneach: an historical and onomastic study.
In StH 20 (1980), pp. 111–139.

doL

3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

*dol (Pictish) (in place names)

13455.
Taylor (Simon): Pictish place-names revisited.
In Pictish progress (2011), pp. 67–118.
Examines the distribution of place-names in northern Britain which contain elements defined as P-Celtic. Appendix 1: Survey of place-name elements organized according to their degree of Pictishness (Category 1: P-Celtic words probably not borrowed into Gaelic: *aber or *abbor, *bren or *brun, *cēt, *cuper, *dol, *eclēs, *lanerc, *mig, *ogel, *pant, *pen, *pert, *pevr, *pren, ?*roth, *traus/*tros, Note on *nemed; Category 2: P-Celtic words borrowed into Gaelic but only attested in place-names: *cair, *carden, *gronn; Category 3: P-Celtic loan-words attested as common nouns in Gaelic: bad, dail, monadh, pett, pòr, preas; Category 4: Gaelic elements influenced by a Pictish cognate: ? beinn, blàr, càrn, dabhach, dùn, foithir, lios, ràth, srath); Appendix 2: The problem of Cardean; Appendix 3: A note on Keir; Appendix 4: Certain, probable or possible ‘Pictish’ names containing elements not discussed above.

dolam

11729.
Breeze (Andrew): Dolf ‘slow’ and the Testament of Cresseid.
In N&Q 57/4 (Dec., 2010), pp. 475–476.
< Ir. dolam(h).

dólámhach

3966.
Braidwood (J.): Terms for ‘left-handed’ in the Ulster dialects.
In UF 18 (1972), pp. 98–110.

Dolbh Scóinne

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

dolbud

6925.
Meyer (Robert T.): Old Irish rhetorical terms in the Milan glosses.
In Word 28/1-2 (1976), pp. 110–116.
1. bestindrim; 2. dolbud; 3. ecosc; 4. figair, fiugar; 5. fuath; 6. iroin; 7. metaforde, metaforecde; 8. sciam; 9. trop; 10. tropdae; 11. tropdaid.

do-lin (du-linat)

475.
Campanile (Enrico): A note on the classification of some Old Irish verbs.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 99–103.
1. do-lin (pl. du-linat) ‘flows’; 2. ara-chrin ‘decays, fails’; 3. ro-cluinethar ‘hears’; 4. at-baill ‘dies’; 5. marnid ‘betrays’; 6. ro-finnadar ‘gets to know’; 7. -gnin ‘knows’.

domain

10762.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch domun “Welt; Erde” und domain “tief” .
In HS 108 (1995), pp. 278–289.

do-mais

4151.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: 2. An instance of do-maisi in the Irish Gospel of Thomas.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 160–161.
ad Gospel of Thomas, q. 21 (as. ed. by J. Carney 1964 [BILL 2778]). Rejects previous emendations and interprets MS domais as the 3rd sg. deut. pret. rel. of do-maisi ‘concocts’.

do-maisi

4151.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: 2. An instance of do-maisi in the Irish Gospel of Thomas.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 160–161.
ad Gospel of Thomas, q. 21 (as. ed. by J. Carney 1964 [BILL 2778]). Rejects previous emendations and interprets MS domais as the 3rd sg. deut. pret. rel. of do-maisi ‘concocts’.
9521.
Breatnach (Liam): Miscellanea Hibernica.
In A companion in linguistics [Fs. Ahlqvist] (2005), pp. 141–151.
1. Old Irish tráigid; 2. The simplex serbaid; 3. do-maisi and a detail of syncope.

do-maithi

4663.
Considine (Patrick): The Indo-European origin of Greek mē̂nis ‘wrath’.
In TPhS 83/1 (Nov., 1985), pp. 144–170.
Also relevant to the etymology of OIr. maith.

domhnach (in place names)

14040.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Placenames and early settlement in County Donegal.
In Donegal history and society (1995), pp. 149–182.
Cinéal Eoghain and Inis Eoghain; Cinéal Conaill and Tír Chonaill; Cinéal Éanna and Tír Éanna; Cinéal Luighdheach and Tír Luighdheach; Cinéal Baghaine and Tír Baghaine; Tír Ainmhireach; Tír Aodha; Dún na nGall/Donegal; Early Christian settlement names [cluain; tulach]; Secular habitation sites as ecclesiastical sites [ráth]; Generic ecclesiastical settlement terms: domhnach; díseart; teach; cill.

do-midethar

872.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: IV. 3. do-midethar in the meaning ‘guesses, solves a riddle’.
In Ériu 34 (1983), p. 195.
Reads thormassid (Thes. ii 292) with short o and lenited m, i.e. as 2pl. pres. subj. of do-midethar.

dominicum (Lat)

1376.
Doherty (Charles): The basilica in early Ireland.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 303–315.
Discusses use of terms Lat. basilica, dominicum and Ir. baislec/baislic , domnach in medieval Ireland.

dominicus (Lat)

1374.
Sharpe (Richard): Some problems concerning the organisation of the Church in early medieval Ireland.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 230–270.
Discusses ecclesiastical terminology (e.g. Lat. paruchia, familia, dominicus (> Ir. domnach), princeps, Ir. airchinnech, epscop tuaithe (cf. Lat. clericus plebis), etc.) and the impact of monasticism.

Dominnach

14976.
Howlett (David), Ireland (Colin) (app. auth.): Two Irish jokes.
In Early medieval Ireland and Europe [Fs. Ó Cróinín] (2015), pp. 225–264.
In Appendix: The Irish names in Suadbar’s letter, by Colin Ireland [Caunchobrach, Fergus, Dominnach, Suadbar].

Dominus Insularum

997.
McLeod (Wilson): Anshocair namm Fionnghall: ainmneachadh agus ath-ainmeachadh Gàidhealtachd na h-Albann.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 13–23.
[1.] Goill, Lethghoill, Fionnlochlannaigh; [2.] Fionnghall; [3.] Rí Innse Gall, Dominus Insularum, Rìgh Fionnghall; [4.] Conclusion.

domnach

1374.
Sharpe (Richard): Some problems concerning the organisation of the Church in early medieval Ireland.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 230–270.
Discusses ecclesiastical terminology (e.g. Lat. paruchia, familia, dominicus (> Ir. domnach), princeps, Ir. airchinnech, epscop tuaithe (cf. Lat. clericus plebis), etc.) and the impact of monasticism.
1376.
Doherty (Charles): The basilica in early Ireland.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 303–315.
Discusses use of terms Lat. basilica, dominicum and Ir. baislec/baislic , domnach in medieval Ireland.

domnach (in place names)

14085.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Early ecclesiastical settlement names of county Galway.
In Galway history and society (1996), p. 795.
On the terms domnach, cluain, eanach, tuaim, teach, díseart, cill, both, as elements in placenames.

Domnach Mór

7222.
Ó Seaneacháin (Diarmuid): Caol Uisce and Domnach Mór: two medieval mysteries by the Erne.
In Donegal annual 56 (2004), pp. 116–125.

Domnall mac Taidc

1184.
Duffy (Seán): Irishmen and islesmen in the kingdoms of Dublin and Man, 1052-1171.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 93–133.
[1.] The first phase: Leinster control; [2.] The period of Munster control; [3.] Godred Crovan: An interloper from the Isles; [4.] Domnall mac Taidc: A Munsterman as king of the Isles; [5.] Magnus Barelegs and Ireland; [6.] The last gasps of Munster dominance; [7.] Connacht’s turn; [8.] Ottar: Another interloper from the Isles; [9.] The overlordship of Ulster; [10.] Dublin invades Man and Man invades Dublin; [11.] Dublin and the Anglo-Norman invasion.

Domnann

2052.
Carey (John): The name Tuatha Dé Danann.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 291–294.
Argues that the derivation of OIr. *Danu from a Common Celtic source is a false assumption; Túatha Dé Danann results of the disambiguation of the term Túatha Dé ‘old gods’.

*domo-

1188.
McCone (Kim): Varia: I. The etymology of Old Irish déis ‘client(s)'.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 193–197.
Derives from *dem- ‘house(hold)'; cf. dám ‘retinue (of clients)' < *domo- ‘house(hold)'.

domucula (Lat)

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

domun

2718.
Hamp (Eric P.): Welsh elfydd and albio-.
In ZCP 45 (1992), pp. 87–89.
ad W. Meid, Über Albion, elfydd, Albiorix und andere Indikatoren eines keltischen Weltbildes, in (pp. 435-439) Celtic Linguistics: Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: Readings in the Brythonic Languages, ed. by M. Ball, J. Fife, E. Poppe and J. Rowlands (Amsterdam 1990).
2762.
Kalygin (Viktor): Some archaic elements of Celtic cosmology.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 70–76.
Studies the semantics of Celt. *dubno-, *albi̯o- and *bitu- (cf. OIr. bith, domun, Alba), suggesting that the use of these terms reflect an older religious idea of a dual universe composed of white and dark parts.
10762.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch domun “Welt; Erde” und domain “tief” .
In HS 108 (1995), pp. 278–289.

domus (Lat)

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).

don

1192.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: V. 1. OIr. sondon.
In Ériu 43 (1992), p. 211.
son ‘happy’ and antonym don; cf. sona/dona.
1234.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: I. 2. On a possible petrified vestige of an Indo-European syntactical rule in Old Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 168–170.
On the petrified survival of genitive case marking the direct object of a transitive verb: nadtairlaic don lit. ‘which has not yielded ground’ (Ml. 131b2).
2708.
Hamp (Eric P.): On the paradigm of OIr. .
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 76–78.
Discusses the origin of the final -n in the oblique cases of this word, and argues that it spread from Proto-Celtic endingless locative *gden through the stem final of the other cases.

dona

1192.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: V. 1. OIr. sondon.
In Ériu 43 (1992), p. 211.
son ‘happy’ and antonym don; cf. sona/dona.

Donann

2052.
Carey (John): The name Tuatha Dé Danann.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 291–294.
Argues that the derivation of OIr. *Danu from a Common Celtic source is a false assumption; Túatha Dé Danann results of the disambiguation of the term Túatha Dé ‘old gods’.

Donegal

14040.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Placenames and early settlement in County Donegal.
In Donegal history and society (1995), pp. 149–182.
Cinéal Eoghain and Inis Eoghain; Cinéal Conaill and Tír Chonaill; Cinéal Éanna and Tír Éanna; Cinéal Luighdheach and Tír Luighdheach; Cinéal Baghaine and Tír Baghaine; Tír Ainmhireach; Tír Aodha; Dún na nGall/Donegal; Early Christian settlement names [cluain; tulach]; Secular habitation sites as ecclesiastical sites [ráth]; Generic ecclesiastical settlement terms: domhnach; díseart; teach; cill.

do-néis

12732.
McManus (Damian): Varia: II. On the 2nd sg. subjunctive of do-ní in Classical Irish.
In Ériu 63 (2013), pp. 155–158.
On the long vowel form do-néis.

donetad

9741.
Lindeman (Fredrik O.): Old Irish donetad: an etymological note.
In Indogermanica europaea [Fs. Meid] (1989), pp. 133–139.

do-ní

12732.
McManus (Damian): Varia: II. On the 2nd sg. subjunctive of do-ní in Classical Irish.
In Ériu 63 (2013), pp. 155–158.
On the long vowel form do-néis.

Donleavy (family name)

14041.
Gillespie (Fergus): Gaelic families of County Donegal.
In Donegal history and society (1995), pp. 759–838.
The families: Mac Ailín: ‘Mac Allen’, Mac Callion, Campbell; Mac an Bhaird: ‘Macaward’, Ward; Mac Carmaic, Mac Cormaic: MacCormick; Mac Colgan: Mac Colgan; Mac Conghail: MacGonigle, Magonigle; Mac Daibhid: MacDevitt, MacDaid; Mac Duinnshléibhe, Mac an Ultaigh, Ultach: Donleavy, MacNulty, Ultagh; Mac Giolla Bhrighde: ‘McKilbridey’, MacBride; Mac Giolla Easpaig: Gillespie; Mac Lochlainn: MacLaughlin, MacLoughlin; Mac Niallghuis: MacNelis, ‘McEnellis’; Mac Robhartaigh: Magroarty; Mac Suibhne: MacSweeney; Ó Baoighill: O Boyle; Ó Breisléin: O Breslin, Bryce; Ó Brolcháin: O Brillaghan, Bradley; Ó Canannáin: O Cannon, Canning; Ó Cléirigh: O Clery, Clarke; Ó Dochartaigh: O Dogherty; Ó Dubhthaigh: O Duffy; Ó Duibh Dhíorma: O Dooyeearma, MacDermot; Ó hEarcáin: O Harkin; Ó Firghil: O Friel; Ó Gairmleadhaigh: O Gormley; Ó Gallchobhair: O Gallagher; Ó Maoil Doraidh: O Mulderry; Ó Maoil Fhábhaill: O Mulfail, Faul, MacFaul; Ó Maoil Mhoichéirghe: ‘O Mulmogheery’, Early; Ó Muirgheasáin: O Morrison, Bryson; Ó Robhartaigh: O Roarty;.

donn

4399.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Dag(h)d(h)ae and his relatives.
In Donum grammaticum (2002), pp. 162–169.
Argues that maith, dag, Dag(dae), Danann (< *Danu), 2 donn ‘princely’, de(i)n are all members of a semantic field ‘good’, and dicusses its etymological connection with a similar semantic system in Italic.

Donn Cúailnge

1153.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Lexical and literary aspects of ‘heart’ in Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 1–18.
1. Introduction; 2. Forms and declension of cride; 3. Sense of cride: 3.1 Primary sense: the physical heart; 3.2 Cride ‘centre, middle part, focus’ vs. medón and lár; 4. The heart as metaphor for courage; 5. The heart as seat and object of love: 5.1 Cnú and cride; 6. The heart as seat of emotions etc.; 7. ‘Heartbreak’ resulting in death: 7.1 General; 7.2 Deirdre; 7.3 Finnabair; 7.4 Donn Cúailnge; 7.5 Other instances; 8. Welsh parallels.

Donnchad Midi

1437.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Tales of three Gormlaiths in medieval Irish literature.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 1–24.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] A goddess Gormlaith?; [3.] Gormlaith (ob. 861), daughter of Donnchad Midi; [4.] Gormlaith (ob. 948), daughter of Flann Sinna; [5.] Gormlaith (ob. 1030), daughter of Murchad mac Finn; [6.] Conclusion. Discusses the processes whereby an historical figure is tranformed into a complex literary character.

Donnchadh Remhur, King of Ossory

1795.
Harrison (Alan): Séanadh Saighre.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 136–148.
Edited from MS RIA D iv 2, with variant readings from MS RIA 23 O 48 (Liber flavus Fergusiorum) and UCD Add. Ir. MS 14 (Mac Firbisigh’s Book of Genealogies); with translation and notes.

do-ratai

9753.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish do·uccai, do·ratai.
In GS Schindler (1999), pp. 355–364.
Argues that do·uccai derives from an old causative *h2/3ōnḱ-ye/o- to the PIE ‘Narten’ present *h2/3ḗnḱ-ti, *h2/3énḱ-n̥ti, and that do·ratai is an old primary verb (< *deh3- ‘give’) absorbed into the weak a-class.

dordán

1271.
Breeze (Andrew): Middle Irish dordán ‘buzz, roar’: Northern English dirdum ‘uproar, din’.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 205–207.
ModEngl. dirdum < MEngl. durdan < Ir. dordán.

do-robidc (< do-bidci)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

Dorsey

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

Dorsum Tómme

12307.
Lacey (Brian): Tírechán’s Sírdruimm, Adomnán’s Dorsum Tómme.
In JRSAI 132 (2002), pp. 148–150.

do-rubidc (< do-bidci)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

dos-

619.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Verbal particles and preverbs in late Middle Irish.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 153–184.
1. Introduction; 2. The textual tradition of Rec. II [of TBC in LL]; Non-historical ro, dos-, ros-, rita-; 4. (Im)mus-; 5. The prefix im/fo; 6. The prefix con; 7. Con for co n-; 8. The origin of late preverbs and particles.

dos

15193.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Two unrecognised Philargyrius glosses.
In Ériu 65 (2015), pp. 127–136.
dus gl. ilice; *suind [MS sum/sunt] gl. fontes. Includes an excursus on scribal Latinization of Irish words.

do-s ·n-áirthet

3461.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 2. do-s ·n-áirthet, tárachtain.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 170–171.

-dótar

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

doth de dub

5146.
Bisagni (Jacopo), Warntjes (Immo): The Early Old Irish material in the newly discovered Computus Einsidlensis (c. AD 700).
In Ériu 58 (2008), pp. 77–105.
Provides a linguistic analysis of the Irish material in Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, MS 321 (647).

dóthain

15469.
Williams (J. E. Caerwyn): Nodiadau amrywiol: [5.] Cymr. llawn ei wala: Gw. lán a dhóthain.
In BBCS 25/4 (May, 1974), pp. 393–396.
On a Welsh analogue to the Ir. idiom tá sé lán a dhóthain.

do-uccai

9753.
McCone (Kim): Old Irish do·uccai, do·ratai.
In GS Schindler (1999), pp. 355–364.
Argues that do·uccai derives from an old causative *h2/3ōnḱ-ye/o- to the PIE ‘Narten’ present *h2/3ḗnḱ-ti, *h2/3énḱ-n̥ti, and that do·ratai is an old primary verb (< *deh3- ‘give’) absorbed into the weak a-class.

Douglas

5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.

Douglas (IOM)

2122.
Broderick (George): Sprachkontakt und Sprachgeschichte der Insel Man im Rahmen ihrer Ortsnamen.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 57–65.

dov(a) (Og)

1071.
Uhlich (Jürgen): dov(a)- and lenited -b- in Ogam.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 129–134.

Downmacpatrick

2454.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Dún Cermna: a reconsideration.
In Éigse 34 (2004), pp. 71–89.
Refutes Keating’s identification of Dún Cermna with Downmacpatrick, on the Old Head of Kinsale, Co. Cork, arguing that the actual location may have been Dunmore in SE Co. Waterford.

do·bidci

7077.
Stifter (David): Varia: II. A rule for z-deletion in Irish?
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 159–164.
vs. GOI §218. Includes a discussion of the etymology of OIr. sochuide.

do·cer

6816.
Campanile (Enrico): Un relitto morfologico in irlandese antico.
In Studi Quattordio Moreschini (1998), pp. 141–144.
luid, -buich, do·cer, , -fuair, -ánaic.

Reprinted in Saggi Campanile, pp. 300-303.

do·cuirethar

3146.
Tremblay (Xavier): Études sur le verbe vieil-irlandais: 1. La classe B V de Thurneysen; 2. ro-laë et les parfaits de bases ultimae laryngalis.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 151–165.
1. ara·chrin, at·baill, do·lin, at·gnin, etc. 2. -cuirethar.

do·eclainn

16549.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Two Old Irish middles.
In Kuryłowicz memorial volume, Pt. 1 (1995), pp. 455–456.
Presents evidence from Audacht Morainn (as ed. by A. Ahlqvist 1984) for the survival of the middle voice in two Old Irish verbal forms, teclannathar (< do·eclainn) and méthathar (< méthaid).

do·fairged

10936.
Breeze (Andrew): Varia Celtica: 4. Scots targe ‘to question’ and Gaelic.
In ACJ 10 (2012), pp. 113–114.

do·fúasailci

9855.
Hofman (Rijcklof): Een Oudiers compositum.
In Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre [Fs. Strien-Gerritsen] (2003), pp. 103–110.
[(In Dutch:) An Old Irish compound.]

Argues OIr. úatúasailcthech is a calque on Lat. absolutus.

do·gní

17852.
Stüber (Karin): do·gní-periphrasis in Old and Middle Irish.
In KF 7 (2015–2016), pp. 105–135.
Suggests this category was never fully grammaticalised, and that remained marginal throughout the history of Irish; also suggests it may have belonged to a sub-literary register.

do·greinn

8146.
Fortson (Benjamin W.): On ‘double-nasal’ presents in Celtic and Indo-European and a new Irish sound law.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 48–78.
Proposes an alternative explanation for the origin of the Old Irish set of verbs ending in -e(i)nnid/-einn in the present (such as ro·geinn, do·greinn, etc.), rejecting K. McCone's derivation of this verb type from PIE ‘double nasal’ presents (in FS Watkins, pp. 465-476) and arguing instead that -nn- is the regular outcome of *-nd- when it was flanked by non-low front vowels.

do·lin

3146.
Tremblay (Xavier): Études sur le verbe vieil-irlandais: 1. La classe B V de Thurneysen; 2. ro-laë et les parfaits de bases ultimae laryngalis.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 151–165.
1. ara·chrin, at·baill, do·lin, at·gnin, etc. 2. -cuirethar.

dracon

10514.
Whitfield (Niamh): Dragon-stones: the fabulous gems.
In A grand gallimaufry [Nick Maxwell essays] (2010), pp. 79–82.
Discusses the descriptions of dragon-stones in early Irish literature.

draigen

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

draoibeal

7889.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Gaelic etymologies for Scots words: drubly, blad, gilravage and gaberlunzie.
In ScotL 27 (2008), pp. 43–50.
Sco. drubly < draoibeal; Sco. blad < blod; gilravage < círéibeach; Sco. gaberlunzie < ciobarlán.

*dre

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

dreaan

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

dreán

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

dreän

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

dreén

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

dréim

9598.
Sayers (William): Games, sport and para-military exercise in early Ireland.
In Aethlon 10/1 (Fall, 1992), pp. 105–123.
Reviews D. Binchy's discussion (in Celtica 8.144) of the terms for games and sports named in Mellbretha: 1. lúb, líathróit; 2. corthe críche; 3. tochailt trebán; 4. lém; 5. snám; 6. sraenán; 7. brandub; 8. fidchell; 9. buanfach; 10. folach migán; 11. immarchor uanán; 12. ardchless co n-ublaib; 13. bocluasc; 14. echréim; 15. cor cloiche; 16. dréim; 17. léim; 18. díbirciud; 19. uathad fri hilar; 20. crosdibirciud; 21. táithe tuilche; 22. bundsach i n-airecht.

Appendix: A synthetic version of the lists of martial feats (cles) as found in the Ulster cycle of tales.

dréim fri fogaist agus agus dírgud crette fora rind co fonnadm níad náir

7651.
Sayers (William): Martial feats in the Old Irish Ulster cycle.
In CJIS/RCÉI 9/1 (1983), pp. 45–80.
Examines the early Irish lists of cles and discusses the individual feats, primarily those associated with Cú Chulainn in Táin bó Cúailnge (cf. TBC 1 ll. 1714-1719): 1. ubullchless; 2. fáeborchless; 3. fáenchless; 4. cless cletenach; 5.téchtless; 6. corpchless; 7. cless caitt; 8. ích n-erred; 9. cor ndeled; 10. léim dar néib/néim; 11. filliud erred náir; 12. gái bolga; 13. bái brasse; 14. rothchless; 15. ochtarchless; 16. cless for análaib; 17. bruud gine; 18. sian caurad; 19. béim co commus; 20. táithbéim; 21. dréim fri fogaist agus agus dírgud crette fora rind co fonnadm níad náir.

dreóilín

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

dreólán

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

drettel

359.
Williams (J. E. Caerwyn): Welsh drythyll, trythyll; Irish drettel, treitell.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 150–157.

Dreva

7962.
James (Alan G.): Varia: [1.] A note on the place-name Dreva, Stobo, Peeblesshire.
In JSNS 3 (2009), pp. 121–126.

Drimmendoo

1506.
Killeen (J. F.): An Irish song in Smollett?
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh, 1973), p. 66.
Argues that Drimmendoo in Tobias Smollett’s The Expedition of Humphry Clinker (1771) represents the Irish song An druimfhionn dubh.

dringthiar

534.
Greene (David): Varia: III. A detail of syncope.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 232–234.
Discussion of ia in unstressed syllables in OIr., including disyllabic forms in ïa, e.g. in verbal forms foídiam, égthiar, dringthiar, rigthier; also discusses relationship between -bïad and -betis of the substantive verb.
9602.
Jasanoff (Jay H.): Some relative forms of the verb in Old Irish.
In GS Schindler (1999), pp. 205–221.

dris

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

dristiúirí

7462.
Ó Máille (T. S.): Seacht sanasáin Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Fs. de Bhaldraithe (1986), pp. 36–47.
1. as éadan; 2. bosca/boiscín; 3. carca, cargadh; 4.criss cross; 5. dristiúirí; 6. fiúigil, -ín; 7. scread maidne.

*droccor

11636.
Jacobs (Nicolas): Irish influence on medieaval Welsh vocabulary: the case of the gnomic poems.
In Ilteangach, ilseiftiúil [Fs. N. J. A. Williams] (2012), pp. 97–120.
Offers an account of selected instances (both certain and doubtful) of lexical borrowing from Irish into Welsh: MW archan, MW diarchenad (< OIr. acrann?); MW cleirch (< OIr. cléirech); MW cor, dryccor (< OIr. cor, *droccor); MW denghyn (< OIr. daingen); MW graen(n)wyn(n) (perhaps includes OIr. gráin as element?); MW llonn (< OIr. lonn); MW mab llen (< OIr. mac léiginn); MW ochsael/ochsail (< OIr. oxal); MW wynebclawr (< OIr. clárainech).

droch

2974.
Hamp (Eric P.): *-og- in British Celtic and notes on bro.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 143–149.
II. Welsh troed, Breton troad, OIr. droch: Suggests that OIr. droch and traig are two different agent nouns derived from the PIE root *dhregh- ‘run’.
5320.
Greene (David): The chariot as described in Irish literature.
In Iron age in the Irish sea province (1972), pp. 59–73.
Discusses the terms dá ech, carpat, dá ndroch, fonnaid, sithbe, feirtsi, crett, cuing, dá n-all, clár, suide, etruide, éissi, brot.

drochet

2768.
Zimmer (Stefan): A uo penn bit pont: aspects of leadership in Celtic and Indo-European.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 202–229.
Includes a discussion of OIr. drochet and drochtech.
2974.
Hamp (Eric P.): *-og- in British Celtic and notes on bro.
In ÉtC 19 (1982), pp. 143–149.
II. Welsh troed, Breton troad, OIr. droch: Suggests that OIr. droch and traig are two different agent nouns derived from the PIE root *dhregh- ‘run’.
11966.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): On Indo-European roads.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter, 2011), pp. 299–341.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms áth, belach, bóthar, casán, conar, drochet, éol, rith, sét, séol, slige.

drochrosc

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

drochshúil

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

drochtech

2768.
Zimmer (Stefan): A uo penn bit pont: aspects of leadership in Celtic and Indo-European.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 202–229.
Includes a discussion of OIr. drochet and drochtech.

Droichead na gCamán

16272.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): Teorainneacha, áthanna agus iomáin.
In THJ (2008), pp. 164–174.
Examines placenames containing references to hurling: Áth an Mhoilc (Ahawilk); Drom Cromáin (Appletown); Droichead na gCamán, Tobar na gCamán (Commaun Bridge, Tobernagommaun); Áth na gCamán (Aughnagommaun); Áth na nUrlainn (Urlingford).

droichead uama

1488.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Mioneolas meadrachta II.
In Éigse 14/4 (Geimhreadh, 1972), pp. 265–268.
[1.] Focail árithe i gcomhardadh (:é, :í, etc.); [2.] Droichead uama. Part [I] in Éigse 14/3 (1972), pp. 207-214; part III in Éigse 15/2 (1973), pp. 89-92.

droichtech

6684.
Bourke (Cormac): Cillíne pontifex.
In IR 49/1 (Spring, 1998), pp. 77–80.
On the term droichtech.

droim

7333.
Mac Aodha (Breandán S.): Eilimintí fisiciúla in áitainmneacha Ard Mhacha.
In SAM 14/2 (1991), pp. 149–160.
Studies the distribution of droim, tulaigh, corr, mulla(ch), cnoc, carraig, cloch and magh/machaire.

Droim Ceanann

2277.
Ó Canann (Tomás): Notes on some Donegal place-names.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 107–124.
I. Ballycannon; II. Meenychanon; III. Cannon’s Lough; IV. Glennagannon; V. Drumcannon.

Droim Crí

2315.
Mac Gabhann (Fiachra): Drumcree, Contae Ard Mhacha.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 89–93.

droim (in place names)

15239.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): Common elements for heights in the placenames of Co. Leitrim.
In Éigse 39 (2016), pp. 176–186.
Corr, droim, mullach, tullach, barr, cnoc.

Droim Ineasclainn

8681.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 20–25, 23–25, 57–61, 61–62, 97–99, 129–131.
1. Tullyvin. 2. Bunclody. 3. Dromiskin. 4. Nóta breise faoi Dhíseart Diarmada. 5. Carrigaholt. 6. Ballon.

Droim Mucú

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

droimneach

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

droing

12348.
Ó Muirithe (Diarmaid): Varia: V. Suggested etymological links for some Irish words.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 269–272.
druing, droing; glioscarnach; gruaim; goin; húiste; muiríoll; roc; strabóig; tascal-money.

drolam

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.
8533.
Kelly (Fergus): Cauldron imagery in a legal passage on judges (CIH IV 1307.38-1308.7).
In Celtica 26 (2010), pp. 31–43.
From Egerton 88; edition, with English translation and linguistic discussion (particulary of the terms tellach, grísach, æal, drolam, innber).

Drom Cromáin

16272.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): Teorainneacha, áthanna agus iomáin.
In THJ (2008), pp. 164–174.
Examines placenames containing references to hurling: Áth an Mhoilc (Ahawilk); Drom Cromáin (Appletown); Droichead na gCamán, Tobar na gCamán (Commaun Bridge, Tobernagommaun); Áth na gCamán (Aughnagommaun); Áth na nUrlainn (Urlingford).

Dromiskin

8681.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 20–25, 23–25, 57–61, 61–62, 97–99, 129–131.
1. Tullyvin. 2. Bunclody. 3. Dromiskin. 4. Nóta breise faoi Dhíseart Diarmada. 5. Carrigaholt. 6. Ballon.

Dromorebrague

2350.
Mooney (B. J.): BUPNS reprints 15: The element ‘brague’ in certain place-names.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 172–174.
Dromorebrague, Lisnabrague, Armaghbrague. [Continued in p. 179.]

Repr. from BUPNS 4/2 (Autumn 1956), pp. 25-27.

drong (in place names)

11842.
MacCotter (Paul): Drong and dál as synonyms for óenach.
In Peritia 22–23 (2011–2012), pp. 275–280.

dronn

8193.
Sayers (William): A cut above: ration and station in an Irish king’s hall.
In FoF 4/2 (1990), pp. 89–110.
Studies the organization of the king’s banquet as described in Suidigud Tigi Midchúarta, discussing in particular the carving sequence and the hierarchically distributed cuts of meat: 1. lónchrúachait; 2. leschrúachait; 3. loarg; 4. muc formuin; 5. colpthae; 6. crúachait medóin; 7. cunn; 8. mael; 9. midimir; 10. milgetan; 11. camchnáim; 12. colpthae muc; 13. remor n-imdae; 14. dronn.
3721.
Lockwood (W. B.): Chr. Matras’ studies on the Gaelic element in Faroese: conclusions and results.
In SGS 13/1 (Autumn, 1978), pp. 112–126.
Surveys eight publications by Christian Matras (1900-1988) on Irish loan words in Faeroese, focusing particularly on the loans from dronn, bláthach, *slabac, dais, cró, tarb, ScG làmh chearr (< OIr. *lám cherr), muirean (or muirín, muiríneach, etc.), sopp, áirge.
Matras (Christian) (ref.)

drualus

9581.
Birkhan (Helmut): Ein Strauß nicht durchwegs bekömmlicher Kräuter aus dem keltischen und germanischen Altertum: Wort- und Sachkundliches zu einigen Pflanzen.
In Studia celtica et indogermanica [Fs. Meid] (1999), pp. 43–52.
[1.] On the relationship between ON hvǫnn and Ir. cuinneóg; [2.] On the names for mistletoe (uile-íce, drua(dh)lus); [3.] Lat. limeum.

drubly (Sco.)

7889.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Gaelic etymologies for Scots words: drubly, blad, gilravage and gaberlunzie.
In ScotL 27 (2008), pp. 43–50.
Sco. drubly < draoibeal; Sco. blad < blod; gilravage < círéibeach; Sco. gaberlunzie < ciobarlán.

druí

3893.
Bondarenko (Grigory): Hiberno-Rossica: ‘knowledge in the clouds’ in Old Irish and Old Russian.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 1 (2006), pp. 185–200.
Discusses similarities between Old Irish and Old Russian formulaic language concerning poetic inspiration.

druid

3503.
Lockwood (W. B.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [9.] The Common Celtic terms for ‘starling’ and ‘thrush’.
In BBCS 34 (1987), pp. 124–125.
5904.
Grant (James): The Gaelic of Islay, a North Channel dialect?
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 69–95.
Study based on 11 linguistic features: 1. Treatment of initial sr; 2. Treatment of postvocalic broad rt; 3. Treatment of stressed a before original long m; 4. Treatment of Old Irish -ig; 5. Treatment of postvocalic broad mh + consonant; 6. Gu robh math agad normal for ‘thank you’; 7. A’ tabhann normal for ‘barking of dog’; 8. Mothaich verb normally used for ‘feel’; 9. Drùin verb normally used for ‘close’; 10. Ballan normal for ‘cow’s teat’; 11. Ag èireachd.

druí-én

1733.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Some gaelic traditions about the wren.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 43–66.
Illustrates the appearance of the wren in Irish literature with 23 examples.

Druim Alban

16907.
Dunshea (Philip M.): Druim Alban, Dorsum Britanniae: ‘the Spine of Britain’.
In SHR 92/2 (Oct., 2013), pp. 275–289.

Druim Ceat

908.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Varia: VII. The two herons of Druim Ceat.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 194–196.
As related by Keating in his Foras Feasa ar Éirinn. In this case, the phrase do-chluinim óna lán do dhaoinibh is not evidence of Keating’s use of oral sources but rather his way conveying the hearsay element of earlier tradition.

Druim Ceat (herons of)

908.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Varia: VII. The two herons of Druim Ceat.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 194–196.
As related by Keating in his Foras Feasa ar Éirinn. In this case, the phrase do-chluinim óna lán do dhaoinibh is not evidence of Keating’s use of oral sources but rather his way conveying the hearsay element of earlier tradition.

Druim Cett

2065.
Bannerman (John): Studies in the history of Dalriada.
Edinburgh and London: Scottish Academic Press, 1974. x + 178 pp.
Edition and study of Senchus fer nAlban; text based on TCD MS H 2. 7, with variant readings from RIA MSS 23 P 12 (Book of Ballymote) and 23 P 2 (Book of Lecan). Incl. text from UCD Add. Ir. MS 14 (Mac Firbisigh’s Book of Genealogies). Cf. J. Bannerman 1966 (BILL 8863). Follows an account of the Convention of Druim Cett (575).

Rev. by
T. M. Charles-Edwards, in StH 15 (1975), pp. 194-196.
Donald Macaulay, in The Scottish historical review 58/1 (Apr., 1979), pp. 92-93.
Donnchadh Ó Corráin, in Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 169-182.

Druim Cliab

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.

Druim Criaich

12606.
Ingridsdotter (Kicki): Motivation for incest: Clothru and the Battle of Druim Criaich.
In SCF 10 (2013), pp. 45–63.
Discusses the episode of Clothru’s incest with her brothers, found in Aided Meidbe, the prose and metrical dindshenchas of Druim Criaich, and Cath Boinde.

Druim Criaig

18379.
Hicks (Ronald): The rout of Ailill and Medb: myth on the landscape.
In Emania 24 (2018), pp. 19–34.
Analyses the itinerary of retreat described in Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó §§19-20 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1935): Mag Ailbe, Roiriu, Áth Midbine, Maistiu, Druim Criaig, Ráith Imgain, Fid nGaible, Áth mac Lúgnai, Druim Dá Maige, Áth Chind Chon.

Druim Dá Maige

18379.
Hicks (Ronald): The rout of Ailill and Medb: myth on the landscape.
In Emania 24 (2018), pp. 19–34.
Analyses the itinerary of retreat described in Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó §§19-20 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1935): Mag Ailbe, Roiriu, Áth Midbine, Maistiu, Druim Criaig, Ráith Imgain, Fid nGaible, Áth mac Lúgnai, Druim Dá Maige, Áth Chind Chon.

Druim Dearg

5501.
McGreevy (Conor): Some early Irish battles sites identified.
In RíM 6/3 (1977), pp. 60–61.
Druim Dearg, Dumha Achir, Granairet, Druim Lochmuide, Guil na Maigher Fremhu, Slanemore.

Druim Léas

1367.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí), Fanning (Thomas) (app. auth.): Rath Melsigi, Willibrord, and the earliest Echternach manuscripts.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 17–49.
Argues that the earliest Echternach codices were strongly influenced by Irish scribal tradition. Rath Melsigi (identified as Clonmelsh, Co. Carlow), mentioned by Bede, is suggested as training ground for Willibrord’s mission to Frisia. Uuictberct, an Anglo-Saxon scholar, is identified with Ichtbricht on the witness list of Cáin Adomnáin. Posits a reference to Druim Léas (Drumlease, Co. Leitrim) in the Calendar of Willibrord. Incl. app. ‘Some field monuments in the townlands of Clonmelsh and Garryhundon, Co. Carlow’, pp. 43-49 by Thomas Fanning. Cf. K. Murphy, in Peritia 8 (1994), p. 169.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 145-172.
Murphy (K.) (ref.)

Druim Lochmuide

5501.
McGreevy (Conor): Some early Irish battles sites identified.
In RíM 6/3 (1977), pp. 60–61.
Druim Dearg, Dumha Achir, Granairet, Druim Lochmuide, Guil na Maigher Fremhu, Slanemore.

Druim Tuama

12307.
Lacey (Brian): Tírechán’s Sírdruimm, Adomnán’s Dorsum Tómme.
In JRSAI 132 (2002), pp. 148–150.

Druime

8695.
Nicholls (K. W.): Some Patrician sites of Eastern Connacht.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 114–118.
Senchell Dumaigi; Sendomnach; Ardsenlis; Druime.

drùin (ScG)

5904.
Grant (James): The Gaelic of Islay, a North Channel dialect?
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 69–95.
Study based on 11 linguistic features: 1. Treatment of initial sr; 2. Treatment of postvocalic broad rt; 3. Treatment of stressed a before original long m; 4. Treatment of Old Irish -ig; 5. Treatment of postvocalic broad mh + consonant; 6. Gu robh math agad normal for ‘thank you’; 7. A’ tabhann normal for ‘barking of dog’; 8. Mothaich verb normally used for ‘feel’; 9. Drùin verb normally used for ‘close’; 10. Ballan normal for ‘cow’s teat’; 11. Ag èireachd.

druing

12348.
Ó Muirithe (Diarmaid): Varia: V. Suggested etymological links for some Irish words.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 269–272.
druing, droing; glioscarnach; gruaim; goin; húiste; muiríoll; roc; strabóig; tascal-money.

Drumacoo

8700.
An tSuirbhéireacht Ordanáis: As cartlann na logainmneacha.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), pp. 33–35, 107–108, 149–160.
1. Glenravel. 2. Farnaght. 3. Ballyhaukish. 4. Barnagrotty. 5. Castlewarden. 6. Drumacoo. 7. Heapstown. 8. Iffa and Offa. 9. Inch St Laurence. 10. Killeshin. 11. Tirerrill. 12. Toberdan. 13. Tolka. 14. Woodstock. 15. Woodstock. 16. Finnoo. 17. Evegallahoo. 18. Lismakeery. 19. Ballymakeery. 20. Sheen. 21. Shiven. 22. Shimna.

Drumargy

2319.
Mac Gabhann (Fiachra): Logainmneacha i gceantar Bhaile Chaisleáin a thit as feidhm.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 108–112.
Drumargy, Drumnacross, Gortrumine, Holm, Portbrittas, Stroanshesk.

Drumcannon

2277.
Ó Canann (Tomás): Notes on some Donegal place-names.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 107–124.
I. Ballycannon; II. Meenychanon; III. Cannon’s Lough; IV. Glennagannon; V. Drumcannon.

Drumconwell

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

Drumcree

2315.
Mac Gabhann (Fiachra): Drumcree, Contae Ard Mhacha.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 89–93.

Drumlease (Co. Leitrim)

1367.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí), Fanning (Thomas) (app. auth.): Rath Melsigi, Willibrord, and the earliest Echternach manuscripts.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 17–49.
Argues that the earliest Echternach codices were strongly influenced by Irish scribal tradition. Rath Melsigi (identified as Clonmelsh, Co. Carlow), mentioned by Bede, is suggested as training ground for Willibrord’s mission to Frisia. Uuictberct, an Anglo-Saxon scholar, is identified with Ichtbricht on the witness list of Cáin Adomnáin. Posits a reference to Druim Léas (Drumlease, Co. Leitrim) in the Calendar of Willibrord. Incl. app. ‘Some field monuments in the townlands of Clonmelsh and Garryhundon, Co. Carlow’, pp. 43-49 by Thomas Fanning. Cf. K. Murphy, in Peritia 8 (1994), p. 169.

Repr. in D. Ó Cróinín, Early Irish history and chronology, pp. 145-172.
Murphy (K.) (ref.)

Drumnacross

2319.
Mac Gabhann (Fiachra): Logainmneacha i gceantar Bhaile Chaisleáin a thit as feidhm.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 108–112.
Drumargy, Drumnacross, Gortrumine, Holm, Portbrittas, Stroanshesk.

Drust

1593.
Padel (O. J.): The Cornish background of the Tristan stories.
In CMCS 1 (Summer, 1981), pp. 53–81.
Incl. discussion of name Drust, found in Tochmarc Emire.

drúth

5124.
Poppe (Erich): A note on the jester in Fingal Rónáin.
In StH 27 (1993), pp. 145–154.
Examines the close association of a king and his jester in early Irish literature, suggesting that the royal buffoon is a symbol of Máel Fothartaig’s right to kingship.
7069.
Boyd (Matthieu): Competing assumptions about the drúth in Orgain Denna Ríg.
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 37–47.
On Cobthach and Labraid’s different interpretations of the relationship between a drúth and his king.
11667.
Breeze (Andrew): Ælfric’s truð ‘buffoon’: Old Irish drúth ‘buffoon’.
In N&Q 42/2 (Jun., 1995), pp. 155–157.
11910.
Harrison (Alan): Tricksters and entertainers in the Irish tradition.
In NACCS 1 (1988), pp. 293–307.
Particularly on the type known as crosán.
13331.
Matheson (Anna): Itinerant drúith and the mark of Cain in O’Davoren’s glossary.
In CMCS 67 (Summer, 2014), pp. 55–71.
O’Davoren 518 s.v. corrchrechda; argues reference is made to a lump appearing on the forehead of illegal satirists.

dtigh

1742.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Réamhfhocail ar lár: dhá nóta.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 121–124.
(1) ad `Ní íosfainn seachtain é' (ad C. Ní Dhomhnaill, in Éigse 17/3 (1978), pp. 371-378); (2) tigh, dtigh, go dtí tigh.

2708.
Hamp (Eric P.): On the paradigm of OIr. .
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 76–78.
Discusses the origin of the final -n in the oblique cases of this word, and argues that it spread from Proto-Celtic endingless locative *gden through the stem final of the other cases.

-dúaid

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

duairc

7126.
McQuillan (Peter): Suairceas in the seventeenth century.
In Field Day review 2 (2006), pp. 94–109.
10154.
Mac Cuillinn (Peadar): Gnéithe de na focail suairc agus suairceas sa 18ú haois.

duairceas

7126.
McQuillan (Peter): Suairceas in the seventeenth century.
In Field Day review 2 (2006), pp. 94–109.

dual (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

dúalach

2532.
Poppe (Erich): A Virgilian model for lúirech thredúalach?
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 171–177.
Suggests that OIr. lúirech thredúalach is calqued on the rare Latin collocation lōrı̄ca trilı̄x (Aeneid 3×), hence the abundant examples in Middle Irish literature.

dualchas (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

dúan

1834.
Watkins (Calvert): The etymology of Irish dúan.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 270–277.
Derives it from *dap-nā, cf. L damnum. Also on other terminology from the reciprocal context of encomiastic poetry.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 536-543.
16807.
Stifter (David): Metrical systems of Celtic traditions.
In NOWELE 69/1 (2016), pp. 38–94.
§1 includes a discussion of the OIr. terms fáith, fili, bard, cerd, dúan, cétal, rosc, cubaid; §5. surveys medieval Irish versification.

duan dheiridh shaothair

1476.
McManus (Damian): The bardic poet as teacher, student and critic: a context for the grammatical tracts.
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 97–123.
On the training of bardic poets; stresses the role of ‘books’. Incl. discussion of associated terminology, e.g. saothrughadh ‘training’, cúrsa saothruighthe ‘a course of study’, duan dheiridh shaothair ‘composition to secure graduation’, sgagadh ‘straining, sifting’, glanadh ‘cleansing’, gleódh ‘purifying’, breithniughadh ‘judging, examining’, oide ‘teacher’.

dúan indles

1834.
Watkins (Calvert): The etymology of Irish dúan.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 270–277.
Derives it from *dap-nā, cf. L damnum. Also on other terminology from the reciprocal context of encomiastic poetry.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 536-543.

duanaire

12735.
Ó Cuív (Brian): The Irish bardic duanaire or “poem book” : The R. I. Best Memorial Lecture delivered by Professor Brian Ó Cuív to the National Library of Ireland Society in the National Gallery of Ireland on 10th May, 1973.
Dublin: Malton Press, 1973. 39 pp.
Published by The Malton Press for the R. I. Best Memorial Trust.

Duanaire Finn

8112.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): The significance of the Duanaire Finn.
In Reassessments on Duanaire Finn (2003), pp. 39–50.

dúas

10032.
Corthals (Johan): Altirisch dúas.
In Fs. Szemerényi 1 (1979), pp. 229–234.
1834.
Watkins (Calvert): The etymology of Irish dúan.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 270–277.
Derives it from *dap-nā, cf. L damnum. Also on other terminology from the reciprocal context of encomiastic poetry.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 536-543.

-dúatar

1281.
Schumacher (Stefan): The preterite of ithid ‘eats’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 149–160.
vs. GOI §689 (a). On the etymology of do-fúaid, -dóid, -dúaid, do-fúatar, do-fótar, -dótar, -dúatar, do-feotar, etc.

Dub Dá Thuath mac Steléne

1947.
Clancy (Thomas Owen): Mac Steléne and the eight in Armagh: identity and context.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 80–91.
Dub Dá Thúath mac Steléne is not to be identified with the Dub Dá Thúath bishop of Rath Áeda mentioned in the annals (so K. Meyer, The vision of Mac Conglinne, 1892 [Best1, p. 117], and A primer of Irish metrics, 1909 [Best1, p. 54]), but rather with the Mac Teléne in The Trial of Mac Teléne found in YBL (see J. G. O’Keeffe, in Ériu 5 (1911), pp. 18-44 [Best1, p. 120]).

Dub Díglach

15749.
Ní Chatháin (Próinséas): The bells of the saints.
In Sacred histories [Fs. Herbert] (2015), pp. 251–257.
Discusses the native names of bells associated with particular saints: 1. Bardán (Ciaráin); 2. Bernán; 3. Bethechán; 4. Bóbán; 5. Ceolán; 6. Dub Dúaibsech; 7. Dub Díglach; 8. Finnfaídech; 9. Glasán; 10. Glúnán; 11. Udachta Pátraic.

Dub Dúaibsech

15749.
Ní Chatháin (Próinséas): The bells of the saints.
In Sacred histories [Fs. Herbert] (2015), pp. 251–257.
Discusses the native names of bells associated with particular saints: 1. Bardán (Ciaráin); 2. Bernán; 3. Bethechán; 4. Bóbán; 5. Ceolán; 6. Dub Dúaibsech; 7. Dub Díglach; 8. Finnfaídech; 9. Glasán; 10. Glúnán; 11. Udachta Pátraic.

Dub Indrecht mac Cathassaich

723.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Onomata.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 165–180.
1. Dar Óma (related to Ogmios); 2. Tairdelbach; 3. Ó Loith; 4. Uí Chobthaigh and their pedigrees; 5. Ua Carráin, Ó Corráin, (O) Curran(e); 6. Máel Dúin mac Áeda and Brega; 7. Dub Indrecht mac Cathassaich, King of Araid; 8. Corco Auluim (Úlum); 9. The supposed monastery of Alltraige Caille; 10. Cnámraige.

dubad

14806.
Fogarty (Hugh): “Dubad nach innsci” : cultivation of obscurity in medieval Irish literature.
In Ollam [Fs. Ó Cathasaigh] (2016), pp. 211–224.
ad Geneamuin Chormaic, lines 30-31 (as ed by Vernam Hull, 1952).

Dubgaill

13938.
Etchingham (Colmán): Names for the Vikings in Irish annals.
In Celtic-Norse relationships (2014), pp. 23–38.
Genti, Gaill, Nordmanni, Nortmainn, Laithlinn, Gaill-Goídil, Dubgaill/Dubgenti, Finngaill/Finngenti.
15116.
Etchingham (Colmán): Laithlinn, ‘fair foreigners’ and ‘dark foreigners’: the identity and provenance of Vikings in ninth-century Ireland.
In The Viking Age (2010), pp. 80–88.
18413.
Downham (Clare): Viking identities in Ireland: it’s not all black and white.
In Medieval Dublin 11 (2011), pp. 185–201.

Dubgenti

13938.
Etchingham (Colmán): Names for the Vikings in Irish annals.
In Celtic-Norse relationships (2014), pp. 23–38.
Genti, Gaill, Nordmanni, Nortmainn, Laithlinn, Gaill-Goídil, Dubgaill/Dubgenti, Finngaill/Finngenti.
15116.
Etchingham (Colmán): Laithlinn, ‘fair foreigners’ and ‘dark foreigners’: the identity and provenance of Vikings in ninth-century Ireland.
In The Viking Age (2010), pp. 80–88.

dubh

1460.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Tírdhreach na nGael: logainmneacha agus an t-samhlaíocht.
In Cruth na tíre (2003), pp. 195–243.
Creative processes in the formation of Gaelic place-names. Incl. some discussion of mór, dubh, beag, caoch, bréige, bréagach, breugach, garbh.

Dubh Èireann

13607.
Breeze (Andrew): Ptolemy’s Taexali, Caelis, Loxa, and Eitis.
In ScotL 24 (2005), pp. 64–74.
[1.] Taexali; [2.] Caelis, the river Deveron; [3.] Loxa, the Lossie, and Welsh llosg ‘burning’; [4.] Eitis and Loch Etive.

Dubhaltach

2248.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): The Gaelic personal name (An) Dubhaltach.
In Ainm 2 (1987), pp. 1–26.
Also as element in place names: Moneygold, Lissadulta, Ballindoalty, etc.

Dubhlinn

18407.
Simpson (Linzi): Pre-Viking and early Viking-age Dublin: some research questions.
In Medieval Dublin 10 (2010), pp. 49–92.
Also comments on the place-names Dubhlinn and Áth Clíath.

Dublind Fraích

1619.
Meek (Donald E.): Táin bó Fraích and other ‘Fráech’ texts: a study in thematic relationships. Part I.
In CMCS 7 (Summer, 1984), pp. 1–37.
[1.] The Fráech texts [Táin bó Fraích, Tochmarc Treblainne and the poems Laoidh Fhraoich (beg. Osnadh carad a Cluain Fraoich), Carn Fraoich, soitheach na saorchlann]; [2.] Fráech and the monster [place-names (e.g. Dublind Fraích, Loch Bága, Carn Fraích, Cluain Fraích) suggest early Fráech texts associated with Connacht; compares and contrasts TBF, LF and CFSS]. App. A contains an Engl. transl. of LF, based on text in MS Edinburgh, NLS Adv. 72.1.37 (Dean of Lismore’s Book).

For part II, see CMCS 8 (Winter, 1984), pp. 65-85.

Dubthir

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.

Dubuice

7888.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Scottish names, including Vacomagi, Boresti, Iudanbyrig, Aberlessic and Dubuice.
In ScotL 26 (2007), pp. 79–95.
[1.] An emendation to Ptolemy’s Vacomagi; [2.] An emendation to Boresti in Tacitus; [3.] The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for 952 and Stirling; [4.] St. Kentigern and Aberlessic, Lothian; [5.] Dubuice, Lurchaire, and the Book of Deer.

duci (Gaulish)

480.
Eska (Joseph F.): The deictic pronominal *ḱey in Celtic.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 153–155.
1. Old Irish ; 2. Gaulish duci; 3. Ogham koi and a Gaulish ghost form; 4. Gaulish isoc; 5. Middle Cornish keth.

dugiionti to (Gaulish)

754.
Evans (D. Ellis): Gaulish dugiiontiio or dugiionti to?
In ZCP 33 (1974), pp. 19–22.
Speculates on the possibility that RIG L-4 may attest a Continental Celtic preposition to.

dugiiontiio (Gaulish)

754.
Evans (D. Ellis): Gaulish dugiiontiio or dugiionti to?
In ZCP 33 (1974), pp. 19–22.
Speculates on the possibility that RIG L-4 may attest a Continental Celtic preposition to.

Duibhe (ScG)

4300.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 3. Duibhe.
In SGS 16 (1990), p. 193.

Duibhlinn

3934.
Clarke (Howard B.): The topographical development of Early Medieval Dublin.
In JRSAI 107 (1977), pp. 29–51.

dúil

2233.
Russell (Paul): The sounds of a silence: the growth of Cormac’s glossary.
In CMCS 15 (Summer, 1988), pp. 1–30.
Incl. survey of extant native glossaries and their MS versions.

dúilchinne

14975.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Pretium benedictionis.
In Early medieval Ireland and Europe [Fs. Ó Cróinín] (2015), pp. 215–223.
Argues that this Latin term (attested in the Hibernesis and elsewhere) corresponds to the dúilchinne of Old Irish law.

Dúilem

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.
4770.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (1. Teil).
In Sprache 43/2 (2002–2003), pp. 171–211.
Collects and analyses instances of agent nouns in -em: Prototypen bzw. frühere Bildungen (ainim(m)/anaim(m), talam); Bekannte und gesicherte -amon und -(i)i̯amon-Bildungen (airem, betham, brithem, cairem, dáilem, dúilem, féchem, fethem, flaithem, glaídem, legam, luam, medam, mraithem, orb(b)am, súainem).

Continued in Die Sprache 44 (2004), 26-69.

dúilem

4800.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Old Irish dúilem ‘maker, creator’.

dùin (ScG)

5904.
Grant (James): The Gaelic of Islay, a North Channel dialect?
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 69–95.
Study based on 11 linguistic features: 1. Treatment of initial sr; 2. Treatment of postvocalic broad rt; 3. Treatment of stressed a before original long m; 4. Treatment of Old Irish -ig; 5. Treatment of postvocalic broad mh + consonant; 6. Gu robh math agad normal for ‘thank you’; 7. A’ tabhann normal for ‘barking of dog’; 8. Mothaich verb normally used for ‘feel’; 9. Drùin verb normally used for ‘close’; 10. Ballan normal for ‘cow’s teat’; 11. Ag èireachd.

duine

2708.
Hamp (Eric P.): On the paradigm of OIr. .
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 76–78.
Discusses the origin of the final -n in the oblique cases of this word, and argues that it spread from Proto-Celtic endingless locative *gden through the stem final of the other cases.
14933.
Meid (Wolfgang): Zur Etymologie des Wortes für ,,Mensch`` im Irischen.
In Palmer studies (1976), pp. 173–179.
Etym. of OIr. duine.

duine agus duine

1854.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 150–157.
I. Sé fhocal ón iasacht: 1. batam; 2. blámás/plámás; 3. gríscín; 4. leibhit, leibhiteáil; 5. strúsín; 6. treiscín.

II. Cúig leagan cainte: 1. dhá chuid; 2. dhá leath; 3. dhá leor; 4. duine agus duine; 5. m’athair agus iad .

duinedíglaim

7071.
McManus (Damian): Good-looking and irresistible: the hero from early Irish saga to classical poetry.
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 57–109.
Discusses the role of male physical beauty in Irish literature, arguing that the elements and themes in the set description of the patron in classical verse derive from the duinedíglaim, or ‘personal profile’, of kings and heroes in early narrative literature.

Duinsech

220.
Hughes (A. J.): The virgin St. Duinsech and her three Ulster churches near Strangford Lough, County Down.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 113–124.
Evidence for St Duinsech in east County Down in the placenames Killinchy, Killinchy in the Woods, and Dunsy Island in Strangford Lough.

dúirt

2840.
Wigger (Arndt): Aspekte der Redewiedergabe im gesprochenen Irischen.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 965–999.
Studies, within a new typological frame, the role, forms and syntax of reported speech in Modern Irish, focusing in particular on deir/adeir, the most used verbum dicendi.

dul i tech

15748.
Murray (Kevin): The dating of Branwen: the ‘Irish question’ revisited.
In Sacred histories [Fs. Herbert] (2015), pp. 247–250.
On the dating of the Irish practice of dul i tech.

Dulnain

8724.
King (Jacob): Varia: Aberkarf.
In JSNS 4 (2010), pp. 159–168.

dúmas

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

dumchoscaibse (du-m-inchoscaib-se)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

Dumfries

13615.
Breeze (Andrew): Where was Historia Brittonum's mare Frenessicum?
In NHi 46/1 (Mar., 2009), pp. 133–136.

Dumha Achir

5501.
McGreevy (Conor): Some early Irish battles sites identified.
In RíM 6/3 (1977), pp. 60–61.
Druim Dearg, Dumha Achir, Granairet, Druim Lochmuide, Guil na Maigher Fremhu, Slanemore.

du-m-inchoscaib-se (dumchoscaibse)

433.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on some Milan glosses.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 177–178.
I. On the regular phonetic development of the cluster ðg in the perfect form do-rubidc, do-robidc (< do-bidci; Ml. 40d9, Ml. 58c3), where rg might be expected in the unstressed position; II. On the interpretation of connuargab (Ml. 37b15) as a nasalising relative clause con n-uargab; III. for innatrachtadaib (Ml. 35b22), read innatrachtaib as in MS; IV. for dumchoscaibse, read du-m-inchoscaib-se (dat. pl. of inchosc ‘instruction’).

dún

8361.
Flanagan (Deirdre): Settlement terms in Irish place-names.
In Onoma 17 (1972–1973), pp. 157–174.
On the use and distribution of the place-name elements dún, ráth, lios, cathair, caiseal.
7348.
Maas (John): Longphort, dún, and dúnad in the Irish annals of the Viking period.
In Peritia 20 (2008), pp. 257–275.
11243.
Watkins (Calvert): A Celtic-Latin-Hittite etymology.
In Lingering over words (1990), pp. 451–453.
On OIr. dún.

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 751-753.

Dún Ailinne

1600.
Wailes (Bernard): The Irish 'royal sites’ in history and archaeology.
In CMCS 3 (Summer, 1982), pp. 1–29.
[1.] Archaeology and history; [2.] The Irish 'royal sites’: historical; [3.] Archaeological propositions; [4.] The 'royal sites’: a detailed view: [i] Emain Macha, [ii] Tara, [iii] Cruachain, [iv] Dún Ailinne, [v] Uisneach; [5.] Discussion. Incl. figs.
4043.
Grabowski (Kathryn): The historical overview of Dún Ailinne.
In Emania 7 (1990), pp. 32–36.

Dún an Óir

12164.
Finn (Tom): Dún an Óir, Fortress of the Gold: how did it get its name?
In Kerry magazine 7 (1996), pp. 42–43.

Dun Caan

12319.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Inis Moccu Chéin.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn, 1976), pp. 267–270.
Is identified with Raasay.

Dùn Cana

12319.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Inis Moccu Chéin.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn, 1976), pp. 267–270.
Is identified with Raasay.

Dún Cermna

2454.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Dún Cermna: a reconsideration.
In Éigse 34 (2004), pp. 71–89.
Refutes Keating’s identification of Dún Cermna with Downmacpatrick, on the Old Head of Kinsale, Co. Cork, arguing that the actual location may have been Dunmore in SE Co. Waterford.

Dún Crimthainn

2200.
Borsje (Jacqueline): Über die Identität von Nár Túathcháech aus der verlorengegangenen Erzählung Echtrae Chrimthainn Nia Náir.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 169–193.
Examines the characteristics of the various figures named Nár attested in early Irish literature.

Dun- (in place names)

8361.
Flanagan (Deirdre): Settlement terms in Irish place-names.
In Onoma 17 (1972–1973), pp. 157–174.
On the use and distribution of the place-name elements dún, ráth, lios, cathair, caiseal.

Dún Lughaidh

2318.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Dunlewy and Dún Lúiche.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 105–107.

Dún Lúiche

2318.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Dunlewy and Dún Lúiche.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 105–107.

Dun Main

3434.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings III: Dún Mainne.
In Peritia 10 (1996), p. 273.
ad Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh §29 (as ed. by J. H. Todd 1867 [Best1, p. 254]) and FA2 §341 (as ed. by Joan Newlon Radner 1978).

Dún Mainne

3434.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings III: Dún Mainne.
In Peritia 10 (1996), p. 273.
ad Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh §29 (as ed. by J. H. Todd 1867 [Best1, p. 254]) and FA2 §341 (as ed. by Joan Newlon Radner 1978).

Dún Mhuire

6348.
Egan (Bartholomew): Dún Mhuire, Killiney, Co. Dublin.
In DHR 25/2 (Mar., 1972), pp. 75–76.
Formerly known as ‘Inveruisk’ (Ir. Inbhear Iascaigh).

Dún Mic Oghmainn

6014.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): The castle of Dún Mic Oghmainn and the overlordship of Carbery.
In JCHAS 93 (1988), pp. 73–82.

Dún Muirígh

5062.
McKay (Patrick): Some Belfast place-names.
In Nomina 23 (2000), pp. 49–54.
Belfast, Cave Hill, Glengormley, Dunmurry, Knockbreda.

Dún na nGall

14040.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Placenames and early settlement in County Donegal.
In Donegal history and society (1995), pp. 149–182.
Cinéal Eoghain and Inis Eoghain; Cinéal Conaill and Tír Chonaill; Cinéal Éanna and Tír Éanna; Cinéal Luighdheach and Tír Luighdheach; Cinéal Baghaine and Tír Baghaine; Tír Ainmhireach; Tír Aodha; Dún na nGall/Donegal; Early Christian settlement names [cluain; tulach]; Secular habitation sites as ecclesiastical sites [ráth]; Generic ecclesiastical settlement terms: domhnach; díseart; teach; cill.

Dún Naomhtha

1648.
Meek (Donald E.): The banners of the Fian in Gaelic ballad tradition.
In CMCS 11 (Summer, 1986), pp. 29–69.
[1.] Analogues of the banners in Germanic and other cultures; [2.] Banners in Irish tradition outside the fian; [3.] Banners associated with the fian; [4.] The banner quatrains in later tradition (incl. names of banners, e.g. Dealbh Ghréine, Fulang Doghra, Aoincheannach, Dún Naomhtha, Lámh Dhearg, Sguab Ghábhaidh, Lóch Luinneach); [5.] Form and composition of the BDL poem [see [6.]]; [6.] Edition (Poem beg. Naoinear a chuadhm[ar] fá choill, ed. from NLS MS Adv. 72.1.37 (Dean of Lismore’s Bk); with Engl transl. and notes). Figs.

Dún Nechtain

16836.
Alcock (Leslie): The site of the ‘Battle of Dunnichen’.
In SHR 75/2 (Oct., 1996), pp. 130–142.
On the location of the battle site mentioned in AU 686.1 (Bellum Duin Nechtain).

Dún Reichet

1298.
Byrne (Francis John): Onomastica 2: Na Renna.
In Peritia 1 (1982), p. 267.
ad Onom. Goed. 388, 580. Argues that na Renna (gen. pl. na Rend, inna Renn) mentioned in the Annals of Inisfallen and the Chronicle of Marianus Scotus is to be identified as the Rhinns of Galloway; Dún Reichet (= Dunraigit) is identified as belonging to this area.

dùn (ScG)

2250.
MacDonald (Aidan): Caiseal, cathair, dùn, lios and ràth in Scotland: 3. lios.
In Ainm 2 (1987), pp. 37–54.

dun (ScG) (in place names)

4461.
Stuart-Murray (John): Differentiating the Gaelic landscape of the Perthshire highlands.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 159–177.
Discusses the following elements in Perth place names: beinn, bioran, caisteal, càrn, cnap, cnoc, cruach, dun, maol, meall, sgiath, sgorr, sìdhean, sliabh, sròn, stob, stuc, tom, tòrr.

dùn (ScG) (in place names)

13455.
Taylor (Simon): Pictish place-names revisited.
In Pictish progress (2011), pp. 67–118.
Examines the distribution of place-names in northern Britain which contain elements defined as P-Celtic. Appendix 1: Survey of place-name elements organized according to their degree of Pictishness (Category 1: P-Celtic words probably not borrowed into Gaelic: *aber or *abbor, *bren or *brun, *cēt, *cuper, *dol, *eclēs, *lanerc, *mig, *ogel, *pant, *pen, *pert, *pevr, *pren, ?*roth, *traus/*tros, Note on *nemed; Category 2: P-Celtic words borrowed into Gaelic but only attested in place-names: *cair, *carden, *gronn; Category 3: P-Celtic loan-words attested as common nouns in Gaelic: bad, dail, monadh, pett, pòr, preas; Category 4: Gaelic elements influenced by a Pictish cognate: ? beinn, blàr, càrn, dabhach, dùn, foithir, lios, ràth, srath); Appendix 2: The problem of Cardean; Appendix 3: A note on Keir; Appendix 4: Certain, probable or possible ‘Pictish’ names containing elements not discussed above.

Dún Scóine

4369.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval etymology, knives, Scone and Skene.
In SGS 23 (2007), pp. 1–19.
On a possible etymological tradition in Agallamh na senórach connecting the personal name Dolbh Scóinne, the place name Dún Scóine and the word sciän with Scone in Perthshire.

Dún Séadna

6084.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): The placename Doonsheane.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 28–30.
Ir. Dún Séadna.

Dún Séann

6084.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): The placename Doonsheane.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 28–30.
Ir. Dún Séadna.

dúnad

632.
Mc Manus (Damian): Úaim do rinn: linking alliteration or a lost dúnad?
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 59–63.
Discusses meaning of úaim do rinn as it occurs in the introduction to MV II (p. 29 as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1891 [Best1, p. 53]) and in the poem Dúnta for ndúan décid lib. Concludes that it is a type of dúnadh, whereby the link is to the end of the first line, i.e. the whole of the first line is repeated.
2137.
Hemprich (Gisbert): Cia ainm cach dunta…: Zum dúnad in den frühen irischen Dichtung.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 101–120.
7348.
Maas (John): Longphort, dún, and dúnad in the Irish annals of the Viking period.
In Peritia 20 (2008), pp. 257–275.

dúnadh

1136.
Ó Háinle (Cathal G.): Refrains in ógláchas poems.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 83–98.
Refrain-type poems can be traced to (a) native developments based on the extension of the use of dúnadh, (b) imitation of foreign types, and (c) a blend of both (a) and (b).

Dunaff

7210.
Doherty (Rosemarie): Place names of Dunaff.
In Donegal annual 51 (1999), pp. 41–45.
Dunaff, a townland in Urris, parish of Clonmany, Inishowen, Co. Donegal.

dun-doichfia

1218.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: II. Notae Mediolanenses.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 267–272.
[1.] Ml. 39d7 [nad-fendar]; [2.] Ml. 28b6 [todoichfet], 39d26 [dun-doichfia] deriving from *to-doich-, associated by folk etymology with doich ‘perhaps, probably’.

Dunlewy

2318.
Mac Giolla Easpaig (Dónall): Dunlewy and Dún Lúiche.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 105–107.

Dunraigit

1298.
Byrne (Francis John): Onomastica 2: Na Renna.
In Peritia 1 (1982), p. 267.
ad Onom. Goed. 388, 580. Argues that na Renna (gen. pl. na Rend, inna Renn) mentioned in the Annals of Inisfallen and the Chronicle of Marianus Scotus is to be identified as the Rhinns of Galloway; Dún Reichet (= Dunraigit) is identified as belonging to this area.

Dunscanby Head

13794.
Breeze (Andrew): Scottish place-names: the way ahead.
In Doonsin’ emerauds (2004), pp. 18–23.
Discusses the following Scottish place-names: 1. Noss Head, Piltanton Burn, Bennachie, and Dunscanby Head; 2. Arran, Cumnock, Girvan, and Irvine; 3. Loquhariot; 4. Pennango and Soutra.

Dunsfort

8691.
Flanagan (Deirdre): Three settlement names in County Down: the Turtars of Inishargy; Dunsfort; Tollumgrange.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 65–71.

Dunsy Island

220.
Hughes (A. J.): The virgin St. Duinsech and her three Ulster churches near Strangford Lough, County Down.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 113–124.
Evidence for St Duinsech in east County Down in the placenames Killinchy, Killinchy in the Woods, and Dunsy Island in Strangford Lough.

dúr

11402.
Sayers (William): Dour: etymology.
In N&Q 59/3 (Sep., 2012), pp. 337–338.
Suggests it is a Latin loanword via ScG dùr.

dùr (ScG)

11402.
Sayers (William): Dour: etymology.
In N&Q 59/3 (Sep., 2012), pp. 337–338.
Suggests it is a Latin loanword via ScG dùr.

dùrd

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

durdan (MEngl)

1271.
Breeze (Andrew): Middle Irish dordán ‘buzz, roar’: Northern English dirdum ‘uproar, din’.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 205–207.
ModEngl. dirdum < MEngl. durdan < Ir. dordán.

Durrihy, Co. Tipperary

3408.
Manning (Conleth): Daire Mór identified.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 359–369.
Longfordpass (alias Durrihy), Co. Tipperary.

Addenda in Peritia 12 (1998), p. 270.

duth

1765.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Leaganacha as Conamara.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 150–158.
I. I gcás go: (a) ‘cé go’; (b) `(cuir) i gcás’. II. Dath ‘cuid’, etc. III. An freagra biorránach.

Dyfed

1789.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The Déisi and Dyfed.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 1–33.
Analysis of The expulsion of the Déisi; appendix includes the edition of a note on the Muinter Chairbre from Rawlinson MS B 502, with variant readings from Laud Misc. 610, and English translation.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 301-329.