Words and Proper Names

á

3474.
Watkins (Calvert): Varia: III. 2. In essar dam do ā?.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 161–165.
On the word á ‘wagon, cart’ and the verse which glosses it in Cormac’s Glossary, beg. In essar dam do ā.

a

2658.
Testen (D.): Palatalization and the Irish ā-stem.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 272–279.
Argues that the declension of the oblique cases of the OIr. ā-stems can be derived regularly from Indo-European with the intervention of the analogical spread to the nominal inflection of an extended stem in *-osiā- based on the forms here postulated for the accusative, genitive and dative of the 3rd sg. fem. demonstrative pronoun.

a > ā /\_nr (UL)

2018.
Watson (Seosamh): An appellation of the Virgin Mary in Rathlin Gaelic.
In Éigse 31 (1999), pp. 131–132.
The first element of Máire Muire in Nils Holmer 1942 (BILL 2786) is to be interpreted as akin to ScG ban-rìgh.

a (+ vn)

637.
McCloskey (James): Nótaí comhréire.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 159–164.
1. Dul comhréire tuaisceartach i nGaeilge na Mumhan (The northern structure ‘Subject Object aL + Verbal Noun’ also to be found marginally in Munster Irish);

2. Ainmní breise sa chlásal neamhfhinideach (The related structure in non-finite clauses of (gan) Noun{1} Noun{2} a bheith Prepositional Pronoun{1} …; also more common in northern than southern dialects; for more detailed discussion, see J. McCloskey and P. Sells, Control and A-chains in Modern Irish, in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 6 (1998), pp. 143-189).

a (before sonorants)

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.

a bheag

11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

a bhfalach

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

a dhath (ar bith)

1673.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Donegal a dhath ar bith.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 197–202.
Discusses different responses in LASID for the word ‘anything’ in Ulster dialects and their distribution, e.g. a dhath, aon dath, dadaidh, dadamh, rud ar bith, etc. Outlines how a dhath ar bith may have been introduced into Omeath Irish from North-West Donegal.

-a (in borrowed words)

755.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid S.): Genitive forms as nominatives in Irish.
In ZCP 33 (1974), pp. 58–65.
Final -a in borrowed words. Some discussion of old nominative as new genitive.

-a (neuter pl.)

867.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 5. The neuter plural in -a.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 182–183.
On the failure of lenition following neuter pl. -a.

a (poss. adj.)

1060.
Mc Gonagle (Noel): Varia: IV. Réamhfhocail agus aidiachtaí sealbhacha a agus ár.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 199–202.
The insertion of -n- before 3 sg. / pl. and 1 pl. possessive adjectives, usually (though not always) following prepositions ending in a vowel. Compare similar insertion of -án- in Cois Fhairrge.

*a (rounded by preceding labiovelar)

1412.
Schrijver (Peter): Vowel rounding by primitive Irish labiovelars.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 133–137.
Conditions under which PrimIr. *i and *a are rounded by a preceding labiovelar; non-rounding of *e in similar phonetic context.

ab

4287.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: [1.] Loch, river Awe.
In SGS 15 (1988), p. 150.
Argues that the place name Loch Obha contains an old genitive preserving the vocalism of nominative aub, oub.

abacc

3054.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 26. Early Irish abacc.
In ÉtC 24 (1987), p. 185.
ad LEIA A-5.
18030.
Schrijver (Peter): Apes, dwarfs, rivers and Indo-European derivation.
In Per aspera ad asteriscos [Fs. Rasmussen] (2004), pp. 507–511.
Discusses the etym. of OIr. abacc and its relationship to aub.

abairt

8309.
Hamp (Eric P.): Religon and law from Iguvium.
In JIES 1/3 (Fall 1973), pp. 318–323.
Umbrian ařfertur is compared to OIr. ad·opair.

aball

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.
2603.
Hamp (Eric P.): The north European word for ‘apple’.
In ZCP 37 (1979), pp. 158–166.
Argues that OIr. ubull derives ultimately from Pre-Celtic *oblu (comparable to Balto-Slavic *ā̆blu), and argues that this belongs to a group of substratum words where original *a has given *o in Celtic.
10727.
Adams (Douglas Q.): The Indo-European word for ‘apple’ again.
In IF 90 (1985), pp. 79–82.

abarta

8309.
Hamp (Eric P.): Religon and law from Iguvium.
In JIES 1/3 (Fall 1973), pp. 318–323.
Umbrian ařfertur is compared to OIr. ad·opair.

abb-abb-abb (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

*Abercarnie

8724.
King (Jacob): Varia: Aberkarf.
In JSNS 4 (2010), pp. 159–168.

Abercorn

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

Aberdeen

13352.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Aberdeen: a toponymic key to the region.
In Northern studies 27 (1990), pp. 50–63.

Aberkarf

8724.
King (Jacob): Varia: Aberkarf.
In JSNS 4 (2010), pp. 159–168.

Aberlady

15148.
King (Jacob): Varia: Aberlady and Abersuainie.
In JSNS 8 (2014), pp. 158–166.

Aberlemno

4435.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland including Arran, Carmunnock, Gogar and Water of May.
In ScotL 19 (2000), pp. 117–134.
1. The isle of Arran; 2. Carmyle, Glasgow; 3. Carmunnock, near Glasgow; 4. The river Gryfe, near Paisley; 5. Watcarrick, near Lockerbie; 6. ‘Crachoctre’, near Coldingham; 7. Gogar, near Edinburgh; 8. Two Angus place-names: Prosen Water and Aberlemno; 9. Arbirlot, near Arbroath; 10. The Water of May, near Perth.

Aberlessic

7888.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Scottish names, including Vacomagi, Boresti, Iudanbyrig, Aberlessic and Dubuice.
In ScotL 26 (2007), pp. 79–95.
[1.] An emendation to Ptolemy’s Vacomagi; [2.] An emendation to Boresti in Tacitus; [3.] The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for 952 and Stirling; [4.] St. Kentigern and Aberlessic, Lothian; [5.] Dubuice, Lurchaire, and the Book of Deer.

Aberlosk

4431.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland, including Dalriada, Kincarden, Abercorn, Coldingham and Girvan.
In ScotL 18 (1999), pp. 34–51.
1. Bede and the name Dalriada; 2. Froissart’s Montres and Melrose Abbey; 3. William Worcestre on Stormont and Dercongal; 4. William Worcestre on Lough Hakern, Islay; 5. Cardenden and Kincardine; 6. Abercorn, Lothian; 7. Insula Leverith, the old name of Cramond Island; 8. Coldingham, near Berwick; 9. Penchrise, near Hawick; 10. Aberlosk, near Moffat; 11. Girvan, Ayrshire.

Abersuainie

15148.
King (Jacob): Varia: Aberlady and Abersuainie.
In JSNS 8 (2014), pp. 158–166.

abgitir

2434.
Márkus (Gilbert): What were Patrick’s alphabets?
In CMCS 31 (Summer 1996), pp. 1–15.
Argues that the abgitorias and elementa that St. Patrick is said by Tírechán to have written are best taken as meaning ‘guides to monastic life’, comparable to OIr. aibgitir in Apgitir Chrábaid.

abgitorias (Hib-Lat)

2434.
Márkus (Gilbert): What were Patrick’s alphabets?
In CMCS 31 (Summer 1996), pp. 1–15.
Argues that the abgitorias and elementa that St. Patrick is said by Tírechán to have written are best taken as meaning ‘guides to monastic life’, comparable to OIr. aibgitir in Apgitir Chrábaid.

abhainn

542.
Watkins (Calvert): ‘River’ in Celtic and Indo-European.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 80–89.
Argues that the comparison with Anatolian proves the antiquity of Celtic n-stem paradigm *abō *abens.

Abhainn Chonainn (ScG)

4301.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 4. Celtic river names in *-n-.
In SGS 16 (1990), p. 193.
Breamhainn, Carrann, Abhainn Chonainn, Calann.

Àbhainn (ScG)

8721.
Cox (Richard A. V.): Scottish Gaelic Sannda and its aliases.
In JSNS 4 (2010), pp. 61–102.

a-bhàn (ScG)

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.
10699.
Grant (James): The Gaelic of Strathspey and it relationship with other dialects.
In TGSI 61 (1998–2000), pp. 71–115.
Focuses on nineteen distinctive features of the Strathspey dialect:

1. Dropping of final unstressed vowel; 2. Dropping of vowel in -as ending; 3. Dropping of -adh ending; 4. He/it (m) (emphatic form) [ScG eise]; 5. They (pronunciation) [ScG aid]; 6. Independent future ending [-(e)as]; 7 & 8: Preaspiration; 9. Breaking of long é; 10. bh vocalized to u; 11. Final slender nn pronounced as ng; 12. Broad s becomes z (when preceded by n); 13. f becomes b (when preceded by m; 14. Playing [ScG. a’ cluich]; 15. Children [ScG cloinn]; 16. Down(wards) [ScG a-bhàn]; 17. East(wards) and west(wards) [ScG sìos, suas]; 18. (Fresh) water [bùrn]; 19. Boy [ScG praitseach].

ábhar

836.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 1. S.-Gh. adabair sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 196–197.
Claims that ModIr. ábhar, ábharsaíocht, abharsaíocht derives from OIr. adabair.

ábharsaíocht

836.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 1. S.-Gh. adabair sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 196–197.
Claims that ModIr. ábhar, ábharsaíocht, abharsaíocht derives from OIr. adabair.

abhlann

13904.
Ó Dochartaigh (Caitriona): Abhlann.
In Treasures of Irish Christianity (2012), pp. 60–62.

abhra

883.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: III. 5. Irish forú fora ‘eyelash’.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 201–202.
ad T. F. O’Rahilly, in Ériu 13 (1942), pp. 216-217 (BILL 1717). Argues that OIr. forbrú has lenited bh by analogy with abhra, fabhra ‘eyelash, eyelid, (eye)brow’.

Abnér

4361.
Dumville (David N.): Gaelic and other Celtic names in the ninth-century ‘Northumbrian Liber Vitae': some issues and implications.
In SGS 22 (2006), pp. 1–25.
Identifies and discusses personal names of certain or arguable Irish origin (Abniar, Adamnan, Bressal, Brón, Denma, Dengus, Faelfi, Fergus, Finan, Fladgus, Reachtchriðe, Salfach, Ultan; Cuna, Cunen, Honoc, Maethcor, Mucca, Ona, Onboth).

abra

10017.
Hamp (Eric P.): Indo-European *(He)op-.
In MSS 40 (1981), pp. 39–60.
ad IEW 323-325. Includes a discussion of the Irish forms listed therein (íarn, íad-, oíbell etc.) and adds Ir. abra to the comparison.

accuis

15914.
Griffith (Aaron): On the Old Irish third palatalisation and the 3sg. present of the copula.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 39–62.
1. Introduction: the third palatalisation and proposed exceptions; 2. Miscuis ‘hatred’ and accuis ‘cause’; 3. Velarisation of consonants; 4. Other evidence: the copula; 5. Summary. In Appendix: The distribution of forms of etar ‘between’.

ach

7088.
Boyle (Daniel): Ach and agus as coordinate and subordinate conjunctions in Gaelic.

-ach

604.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Place-names as a resource for the historical linguist.
In Uses of place-names (1998), pp. 12–53.
Discusses a number of linguistic features of Irish and Scottish place-names, incl. fossils of neuter gender, lenition, eclipsis, and -in ⁓ -ie variation and -ach in Scottish place-names.

-ach (in place names)

4323.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Gaelic -ach to Scots -o in Scottish place-names.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 278–291.

-ach (gen. pl.)

1079.
McGonagle (Noel): Varia: V. A genitive plural termination.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 187–189.
On the gen. pl. terminations -ann and -ach in dialects of Ulster and north Connacht.

ach go

446.
Stockman (Gearóid): Má go, amach ach.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 130–131.
Má go, maga, maha go ‘if not, unless’. Confusion of prepositions ach and amach ó ‘except’ spread to conjunction ach go, hence amach ó go (= má go), from which Ros Guill preposition amach ach was extracted based on homophony of ach and ó in this dialect as /a/. Cf. B. Ó Buachalla, in Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 143-161.

-ach (in place names)

16257.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): Logainmneacha dar críoch -ach i gCo. Thiobraid Árann.
In THJ (2005), pp. 9–23.
6440.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): Tipperary place-names and Irish -ach.
In 8th Symposium of Societas Celtologica Nordica (2007), pp. 165–185.
Earlier version published in Tipperary Historical Journal (2005), pp. 9–23.

ach (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

ach (prep.)

446.
Stockman (Gearóid): Má go, amach ach.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 130–131.
Má go, maga, maha go ‘if not, unless’. Confusion of prepositions ach and amach ó ‘except’ spread to conjunction ach go, hence amach ó go (= má go), from which Ros Guill preposition amach ach was extracted based on homophony of ach and ó in this dialect as /a/. Cf. B. Ó Buachalla, in Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 143-161.

-ach (ScG) (in place names)

4396.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Gaelic place-names in Scots.
In ScotL 5 (Autumn 1986), pp. 140–146.

-acha (pl.)

9752.
Lazar-Meyn (Heidi Ann): Modern Irish grammars and the plural marker -acha.
In ICHL 5 (1982), pp. 196–200.

achad

764.
Hamp (Eric P.): Old Irish ed, id.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20–29.
Discusses the etym. of (I) OIr. ed ‘space, distance, interval, etc.' and related ined (later inad) ‘place, spot, position, etc.', and id ‘withe, fetter, etc.', all from basic PIE root *ped- ‘foot’; and argues against C. Marstrander (in BILL: 1471) that achad and machad are compounds of an s-stem with a second element *-edo- from the above-mentioned PIE root.

Revised by the author in ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74-75.
2707.
Hamp (Eric P.): Ad ZCP 34, 1975, 20 ff.
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 74–75.
Revision of E. P. Hamp, Old Irish ed, id, in ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 20-29.

Achadh Bolg

14030.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): ‘To be named is to exist’: the instructive case of Achadh Bolg (Aghabulloge).
In Cork history and society (1993), pp. 45–61.

Achadh Gréine

16116.
Quinn (John): The identification of Aughagrany and its correlation with Achadh Gréine in Betha Beraigh (The life of Saint Barry).
In Ainm 12 (2014), pp. 117–144.
ad C. Plummer, BNÉ ii, p. 23 (identified with Aughagrany, bar. Mohill, Co. Leitrim).

achadh (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

achadh (ScG) (in place names)

4396.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Gaelic place-names in Scots.
In ScotL 5 (Autumn 1986), pp. 140–146.

-ach/-ech

2036.
Russell (Paul): Celtic word formation: the velar suffixes.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1990. xii + 242 pp.
pp. 108-116: Irish -óc/-uc; pp. 131-135: Irish -ach and d(a)e.

App. V contains a collection of derivatives formed with the suffixes -ach/-ech and óc/-óg.

Rev. by
Aidan Doyle, textit{in} Lingua 87/4 (Aug. 1992), pp. 345-347.
Pierre-Yves Lambert, in ÉtC 30 (1994), pp. 317-321.
Karl Horst Schmidt, in ZCP 45 (1992), pp. 307-310.
Arwyn Watkins, in StC 26-27 (1991-1992), pp. 272-274.

acht

529.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): Stair an chónaisc acht go.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 143–161.
1. acht con ‘provided that’; 2. acht go i nGaeilge Chorca Dhuibhne; 3. acht go i nGaeilge na Gaillimhe; 4. acht go i nGaeilge Iorrais; 5. acht go i nGaeilge Dhún na nGall; 6. acht go i nGaeilge na hAlban; 7. Réimse shéimeantach acht go; 8. Léiriú; 9. acht sa Nua-Ghaeilge; 10. Conclúid.
640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.
8922.
Vries (Ranke de): Two early examples of the preposition acht followed by the accusative case outside the law texts and an example of acht inge.
In Ériu 60 (2010), pp. 137–144.
Examples extracted from De causis torchi Corc’ Óche.

acht go

529.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): Stair an chónaisc acht go.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 143–161.
1. acht con ‘provided that’; 2. acht go i nGaeilge Chorca Dhuibhne; 3. acht go i nGaeilge na Gaillimhe; 4. acht go i nGaeilge Iorrais; 5. acht go i nGaeilge Dhún na nGall; 6. acht go i nGaeilge na hAlban; 7. Réimse shéimeantach acht go; 8. Léiriú; 9. acht sa Nua-Ghaeilge; 10. Conclúid.

acht inge

8922.
Vries (Ranke de): Two early examples of the preposition acht followed by the accusative case outside the law texts and an example of acht inge.
In Ériu 60 (2010), pp. 137–144.
Examples extracted from De causis torchi Corc’ Óche.

Acra an Bhulaí

7769.
Dempsey (Gary): In search of the ‘Bully’s Acre’.
In AI 23/3 (Autumn 2009), pp. 9–10.

acrann

10732.
Knobloch (Johann): Eine ossetisch-irische Isoglosse: der idg. ‘Bergschuh’.
In IF 97 (1992), pp. 68–69.
MIr. acrann.
11636.
Jacobs (Nicolas): Irish influence on medieaval Welsh vocabulary: the case of the gnomic poems.
In Ilteangach, ilseiftiúil [Fs. N. J. A. Williams] (2012), pp. 97–120.
Offers an account of selected instances (both certain and doubtful) of lexical borrowing from Irish into Welsh: MW archan, MW diarchenad (< OIr. acrann?); MW cleirch (< OIr. cléirech); MW cor, dryccor (< OIr. cor, *droccor); MW denghyn (< OIr. daingen); MW graen(n)wyn(n) (perhaps includes OIr. gráin as element?); MW llonn (< OIr. lonn); MW mab llen (< OIr. mac léiginn); MW ochsael/ochsail (< OIr. oxal); MW wynebclawr (< OIr. clárainech).

Act of Truth

724.
Watkins (Calvert): Is tre ḟír flathemon: marginalia to Audacht Morainn.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 181–198.
Discusses other PIE parallels of ‘Act of Truth’ and cognate verbal expressions of the following four expressions: 1. Is tre ḟír flathemon ‘it is through the ruler’s truth’; 2. mortlithi (mórslóg no) márlóchet di doínib dingbatar ‘plagues, (a great host, or) great lightnings are warded off men’; 3. gáu ḟlathemon ‘ruler’s falsehood’; 4. [n]-aurdallat dána (support for emendation to ní-n-aurdallat anai ‘let not riches blind him’ (see F. Kelly, AM §31); 5. to- aidble éisc i sruthaib -snáither (emends to to- aidbli éisc i sruthaib -snáither ‘with abundance of fish it is swum in streams’, taking to-snáither to be an impersonal passive rather than 2nd sg. deponent (see F. Kelly, AM §20).

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 626-643.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)

acus

4181.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: III. 3. acusocuis.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 159–161.
Argues it derives from a PIE idiom *adĝ(h)osti- ‘that which is at/to hand’, which has a semantic parallel in Lat. praestō < *prae-hest-ōd (cf. PIE *ĝ(h)es- ‘hand’).

ad

900.
Joseph (Lionel S.): A survival from the Italo-Celtic legal vocabulary.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 119–125.
OIr. líthech ‘accused person’ (cf. liïd ‘accuses’) and Lat. lı̄s, lı̄tis ‘lawsuit’; also OIr. ad ‘law’, adae ‘due, fitting, proper’, adas ‘suitable, appropriate to’ and Umbrian arsie ‘sancte’, etc; OIr. coll ‘injury, violation’ and Lat. culpa ‘blame’; cf. *-din- in trédenus ‘three days’ and Lat. nundinum ‘nine days’.
16920.
Watkins (Calvert): Another thorny problem.
In Linguistica 33 (1993), pp. 243–248.
Uses Hittite comparisons to argue for a specific meaning ‘hawthorn’ or ‘whitethorn’ for OIr. rare plant name ad.

ad-

9764.
Josephson (Folke): The function of OI com, ad, ro and similar elements in Slavic.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 2 (2009), pp. 163–172.

ad- (intensive in W.)

743.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VI. álad ‘wound’.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 172.
ad E. P. Hamp, ‘Intensives in British Celtic and Gaulish: intensive ad- in Welsh’, StC 12-13 (1977-78), p. 6.

adaas

3147.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Le complément du comparatif de superiorité en vieil-irlandais.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 167–177.
Discusses in particular the use of the independent dative, the preposition ol, and the phrases ol-daas, in-daas, a-daas to express the standard of comparison.

adabair

836.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 1. S.-Gh. adabair sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 196–197.
Claims that ModIr. ábhar, ábharsaíocht, abharsaíocht derives from OIr. adabair.

adae

900.
Joseph (Lionel S.): A survival from the Italo-Celtic legal vocabulary.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 119–125.
OIr. líthech ‘accused person’ (cf. liïd ‘accuses’) and Lat. lı̄s, lı̄tis ‘lawsuit’; also OIr. ad ‘law’, adae ‘due, fitting, proper’, adas ‘suitable, appropriate to’ and Umbrian arsie ‘sancte’, etc; OIr. coll ‘injury, violation’ and Lat. culpa ‘blame’; cf. *-din- in trédenus ‘three days’ and Lat. nundinum ‘nine days’.

adaig

11272.
Luján Martínez (Eugenio Ramón): La diosa Ataecina y el nombre de la noche en antiguo irlandés.
In Emerita 66/2 (1998), pp. 291–306.
OIr. adaig.

adarc

9423.
Tovar (Antonio): Tradición e innovación en el léxico céltico: algunas etimologías.
In O-o-pe-ro-si [Fs. Risch] (1986), pp. 684–689.
[1.] ‘cuello’; [2.] ‘cuerno’; [3.] ‘sueño’, ‘dormir’; [4.] ‘agua’.
10273.
Cowan (H. K. J.): The affinities of non-Celtic Pictish.
In LB 73 (1984), pp. 433–488.
§6: Non-IE words in Insular Celtic [discusses ainder, carr, carra, carrac, carn, cala (ScG), barra (ScG), cuan, adarc, mothar, land]; §7: Non-IE names in Scotland [discusses Alba(n), Isla, Sale, Caledonia, etc.].

Adarca Iuchna

10449.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Placenames, etymology, and the structure of Fianaigecht.
In Béaloideas 54–55 (1986–1987), pp. 1–24.
Discusses various examples of medieval Irish literary etymologizing: 1. Oisín (from Dinnshenchas); 2. áes síde (from Echtra Conli); 3. Cenn Currig, Currech Lifi and Bodamair (from Bruiden Átha hÍ); 4. Adarca Iuchna and *Léimm Finn (from Aided Find).

Repr. in The heroic process (1987), pp. 1-24.

adas

900.
Joseph (Lionel S.): A survival from the Italo-Celtic legal vocabulary.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 119–125.
OIr. líthech ‘accused person’ (cf. liïd ‘accuses’) and Lat. lı̄s, lı̄tis ‘lawsuit’; also OIr. ad ‘law’, adae ‘due, fitting, proper’, adas ‘suitable, appropriate to’ and Umbrian arsie ‘sancte’, etc; OIr. coll ‘injury, violation’ and Lat. culpa ‘blame’; cf. *-din- in trédenus ‘three days’ and Lat. nundinum ‘nine days’.

adastar

13978.
Kelly (Patricia): The earliest words for ‘horse’ in the Celtic languages.
In The horse in Celtic culture (1997), pp. 43–63.
Generic terms: 1. OIr. ech; 2. W march, OIr. marc; 3. MW cafall, ceffyl, caffon, OIr. capall; 4. W gorwydd; 5. W eddystyr [OIr. adastar]; 6. OIr. gabor; 7. mandu? [MIr. menn]. ‘Stallion’ [OIr. caullach, etc.]. ‘Gelding’ [OIr. meile]. ‘Mare’ [OIr. láir]. ‘Foal’ [OIr. lurchaire; OIr. serrach].

*ad-beir

8309.
Hamp (Eric P.): Religon and law from Iguvium.
In JIES 1/3 (Fall 1973), pp. 318–323.
Umbrian ařfertur is compared to OIr. ad·opair.

ad-bheir

2684.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III. Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 3. Non-classical forms in bardic poetry.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 152–159.
ad-bheir, do-ghní, ro-d fia (= OIr. rot-bia), aill in feacht n-aill (= OIr. neut. aill), dochum/chum, beidid (< MIr. beitit), roimhl.

ad-boind

8232.
Watkins (Calvert): “In the interstices of procedure” : Indo-European legal language and comparative law.
In Studien zum indogermanischen Wortschatz (1987), pp. 305–314.

ad-cí

3413.
Quin (E. G.): Three notes: 2. The simplex of ad-cí.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 140–141.
Derives it from ciïd (‘weeps’).
11028.
Hamp (Eric P.): Unexpected forms in Gaelic: piuthar and faca.
In SGS 26 (Summer 2010), pp. 5–6.

ad-cumaing

2823.
Ó Corráin (Ailbhe): On the syntax and semantics of expressions of being in Early Irish.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 629–642.
Provides an analysis within the framework of case grammar of this range of expressions – excluding the copula and the substantive verb– along with other stative concepts expressing cognition, perception and possession, and postulates a common underlying syntactic structure where the logical subject is expressed in the locative case.

ad-daí

3056.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 28. Terms for ‘torch’ and stems for ‘kindle’: 1. OIr. a(i)thinne and atúd.
In ÉtC 24 (1987), p. 186.

adeir

2840.
Wigger (Arndt): Aspekte der Redewiedergabe im gesprochenen Irischen.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 965–999.
Studies, within a new typological frame, the role, forms and syntax of reported speech in Modern Irish, focusing in particular on deir/adeir, the most used verbum dicendi.

ad-géuin

3281.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Welsh adwaen.
In BBCS 29/4 (May 1982), pp. 684–686.
OIr. ad-géuin/-aithgéuin.

ad-gnin

3281.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Welsh adwaen.
In BBCS 29/4 (May 1982), pp. 684–686.
OIr. ad-géuin/-aithgéuin.
11805.
Hill (Eugen): Silbische Liquiden vor Nasalen im Inselkeltischen und das Problem der Nasalpräntien vom Typ air. sernaid, kymr. -sarnu.
In KF 5 (2010–2012), pp. 157–184.
Discusses the continuation in Insular Celtic of the PIE nasal presents made to roots in final laryngeal (exemplified by OIr. sernaid, ernaid, marnaid, ·cella, ·ella, -t·baill, ·gnin).

-adh > Ø

1342.
Grant (Seumas): Gaelic in Western Banffshire: the extent of Gaelic speech in 1881 and the nature of the Gaelic dialect spoken.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 75–90.
[1.] Evidence for Gaelic speech in Banffshire in 1881; [2.] Evidence for the Gaelic dialect of Banffshire. Features with corresponding maps discussed incl.: 1. -am, -om; 2. -all, -oll, -ann, -onn; 3./4. Preaspiration before t and p; 5. -adh > Ø; 6. bh > u; 7. Slender -nn > [ŋˊ]; 8. -m + f- > -m + b-; 9. -n + s- > -n + z-; 10. -n + ʃ> -n + ʤ; 11. ‘east’ (sìos), ‘west’ (suas); 12. down(wards) (a-bhàn); [3.] Conclusions.

ad(h)arc

1227.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Ir. buaball, W bual ‘drinking horn’.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 81–93.
Some discussion of ad(h)arc, corn, bleide, coppán, hirlas (W).

adib

3080.
Lindeman (Fredrik O.): Varia: 2. Old Irish adib.
In ÉtC 26 (1989), pp. 76–79.
Discusses the 2nd pl. of the copula, including conjunct forms (cenuded, cenutad).

Republ. in Lindeman studies, pp. 181-184.

admall

5832.
Ó hAodha (Donncha): An bhairdne i dtús a ré.
In LCC 24 (1994), pp. 9–20.
Discusses the metrical tract entitled Córus bard cona bairdne (Mittelirische Verslehren I, ed. by R. Thurneysen 1891 [Best1, p. 53]). Includes a list of the metres associated with every grade.

ad-namat-

676.
Hamp (Eric P.): On some Gaulish names in -ant and Celtic verbal nouns.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 1–20.
1. ientu- ⁓ iantu-; 2. namanto-: its distribution; 3. carant-, carat-; 4. caro-; 5. namant-: its morphology; 6. ad-namat-: its morphology; 7. OIr. serc [śerk]; 8. nantu-, nanti-; 9. Sego- and u̯al-; 10. The stem i(e)ntu-; 11. Conclusion; [12.] Appendix [on some Latin parallels].

ad-noí

2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

Adomnán

4361.
Dumville (David N.): Gaelic and other Celtic names in the ninth-century ‘Northumbrian Liber Vitae': some issues and implications.
In SGS 22 (2006), pp. 1–25.
Identifies and discusses personal names of certain or arguable Irish origin (Abniar, Adamnan, Bressal, Brón, Denma, Dengus, Faelfi, Fergus, Finan, Fladgus, Reachtchriðe, Salfach, Ultan; Cuna, Cunen, Honoc, Maethcor, Mucca, Ona, Onboth).

ad-opair

2628.
Hamp (Eric P.): The Indo-European roots *bher- in the light of Celtic and Albanian.
In ZCP 39 (1982), pp. 205–218.
Discusses berid, ad-opair, fúabair and related forms.
8309.
Hamp (Eric P.): Religon and law from Iguvium.
In JIES 1/3 (Fall 1973), pp. 318–323.
Umbrian ařfertur is compared to OIr. ad·opair.

ad-rig

3055.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 27. Celtic *reg- and *reig-.
In ÉtC 24 (1987), pp. 185–186.
Corrects the headword “2 reg-'' in LEIA R-15 to reig-.
2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

Aduar (St) son of Echen

512.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): A misunderstood annal: a hitherto unnoticed Cáin.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 561–566.
Annals of Inisfallen, s.a. 810, is to be taken as ‘the law (or laws) concerning cows, of Darí and of Aduar son of Echen, promulgated in Mumu’.

ad·cí

10756.
Hamp (Eric P.): Some Italic and Celtic correspondences II: 12. Latin obscūrus.
In HS 96 (1982–1983), pp. 98–99.

áe

2658.
Testen (D.): Palatalization and the Irish ā-stem.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 272–279.
Argues that the declension of the oblique cases of the OIr. ā-stems can be derived regularly from Indo-European with the intervention of the analogical spread to the nominal inflection of an extended stem in *-osiā- based on the forms here postulated for the accusative, genitive and dative of the 3rd sg. fem. demonstrative pronoun.

ae drobéssach

3769.
Hughes (A. J.): Some aspects of the salmon in Gaelic tradition past and present: 2. On identifying salmon in the Vita Tripartita of St. Patrick and elsewhere.
In ZCP 48 (1996), pp. 22–28.
ad Vita Tripatita, 146.7-14 (as ed. by W. Stokes, 1887 [Best1, p. 240]), where fishermen are said to be able to distinguish salmon by river.

ae freislighe

735.
Simms (Katharine): Gabh umad a Fheidhlimidh. A fifteenth-century inauguration ode?
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 132–145.
Poem beg. Gabh umad a Fheidhlimidh addressed to Feidhlim(idh) Fionn, son of Ó Conchobhair Ruadh and composed by the historian Torna Ua Maoil Chonaire (†1468) c. 1464-66. Refers to two other poems possibly composed by same author, i.e. Tosach féile fairsinge, addressed to Tomaltach son of Conchobhar Óg MacDiarmada, chief of Magh Luirg (†1458); Buaidh n-easbaig ar Ardachadh, addressed to Cormac MagShamhradhain, bishop of Ardagh 1444-ca. 1476. Notes association of ae freislighe metre with informal poetry and its use by gifted amateurs rather than professional bards.

aél

8533.
Kelly (Fergus): Cauldron imagery in a legal passage on judges (CIH IV 1307.38-1308.7).
In Celtica 26 (2010), pp. 31–43.
From Egerton 88; edition, with English translation and linguistic discussion (particulary of the terms tellach, grísach, æal, drolam, innber).
8836.
Watkins (Calvert): The Old Irish word for ‘fleshfork’.
In Heroic poets and poetic heroes in Celtic tradition (2005), pp. 377–378.
OIr. aél.

áer

1847.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Curse and satire.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 10–15.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 95-100.
3207.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [2.] On *org-nV-.
In BBCS 25/4 (May 1974), pp. 388–391.
On the etym. of OIr. áer.
3495.
Orel (Vladimir E.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [6.] OIr. áer.
In BBCS 32 (1985), pp. 164–166.
3505.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [10.] OIr. áer, Slavic *jǐgra.
In BBCS 35 (1988), p. 55.
ad V. E. Orel, OIr. áer, in BBCS 32 (1985), pp. 164-166.
16172.
Holmberg (Matthew): Triple utterances and curse-poles: a common form of northern European satire?
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 75–93.
Points out the similarities in form and function between OIr. treḟocul and Norse niðstǫng, arguing in favour of a common origin for these two maledictory practices.

áes dána

824.
McCone (Kim): Aided Cheltchair maic Uthechair: hounds, heroes and hospitallers in early Irish myth and story.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 1–30.
Includes an appendix on the principal divisions in early Irish social ideology, the four main classes being áes dána, díberga, briugaid, féni (flaithi / ríg).
1756.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (24–120).
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 1–35.
Continued from Éigse 18 (1981), pp. 183-209.

áes síde

10449.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Placenames, etymology, and the structure of Fianaigecht.
In Béaloideas 54–55 (1986–1987), pp. 1–24.
Discusses various examples of medieval Irish literary etymologizing: 1. Oisín (from Dinnshenchas); 2. áes síde (from Echtra Conli); 3. Cenn Currig, Currech Lifi and Bodamair (from Bruiden Átha hÍ); 4. Adarca Iuchna and *Léimm Finn (from Aided Find).

Repr. in The heroic process (1987), pp. 1-24.

ag

1182.
Ó Sé (Diarmuid): The perfect in Modern Irish.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 39–67.
1. Introduction; 2. Historical and typological background; 3. The past participle periphrases in Munster Irish; 4. Possessive ag or agentive ag?; 5. The use of the perfect in Irish; 6. The perfect in Ulster Irish and Manx; 7. Historical background; 8. Conclusions.

ag (+ agent)

3186.
Ó Sé (Diarmuid): Agent phrases with the autonomous verb in modern Irish.
In Ériu 56 (2006), pp. 85–115.
Describes the development of the use of the prepositions le, ag and ó to form agent phrases in Modern Irish; includes a brief discussion of the state of affairs in Early Irish.

ag (before vn)

620.
Mac Cana (Proinsias), Ó Baoill (Dónall P.): On the extended use of ag before verbal nouns.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 185–191.

ag goil (+ vn + object pronoun)

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

ag seo

1566.
Breatnach (R. A.): An gléas teaspáinteach.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
ag seo, ag sin.

ag sin

1566.
Breatnach (R. A.): An gléas teaspáinteach.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 215–220.
ag seo, ag sin.

agá

12473.
Ó hUiginn (Ruairí) (ed.): A note on relative marking in Irish.
In Land beneath the sea [Ahlqvist essays] (2013), pp. 163–169.
On the development of the oblique relative clause in Irish.

agaill

12344.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Dornán iasachtaí sa Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 246–251.
1. giústa / giúsda / giusda; 2. bolb; 3. corsaicí / cursaicí / cosaicí / cosáicí; 4. (sna) luchógaí; 5. agaill / agailt / agaille / angailt / anglach; 6. pailis / pailís / pálás.

agaille

12344.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Dornán iasachtaí sa Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 246–251.
1. giústa / giúsda / giusda; 2. bolb; 3. corsaicí / cursaicí / cosaicí / cosáicí; 4. (sna) luchógaí; 5. agaill / agailt / agaille / angailt / anglach; 6. pailis / pailís / pálás.

agailt

12344.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Dornán iasachtaí sa Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 246–251.
1. giústa / giúsda / giusda; 2. bolb; 3. corsaicí / cursaicí / cosaicí / cosáicí; 4. (sna) luchógaí; 5. agaill / agailt / agaille / angailt / anglach; 6. pailis / pailís / pálás.

agar

2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

Aghabulloge

14030.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): ‘To be named is to exist’: the instructive case of Achadh Bolg (Aghabulloge).
In Cork history and society (1993), pp. 45–61.

Aghaderg

2358.
Mooney (B. J.): BUPNS reprints 22: The element ‘derg’ in certain place-names.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 199–202.
Aghaderg, Lenaderg, Derry.

Repr. from BUPNS 3/1 (Spring 1955), pp. 1-4.

aghaidh

1951.
Breatnach (R. A.): Focal ar fiarlóid.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 113–117.
aghaidh and oidhe(adh) meaning ‘deserts’ in idiomatic expressions should be written an fhoighe since < OIr. foigde ‘begging’.

Followed by an Addendum to Éigse 7 (1953-55), pp. 265-6.

3161.
Hughes (Art J.): Un cas d’homonymie: les termes pour “visage” e pour “foie” dans les langues gaéliques.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 217–232.
aghaidh, éadan, aodan.

Agnew

5010.
Ó Cuív (Brian): The family of Ó Gnímh in Ireland and Scotland: a look at the sources.
In Nomina 8 (1984), pp. 57–71.
4325.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Further comments on the Ó Gnímh family of Co. Antrim.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 298–304.
Further to Brian Ó Cuív, in Nomina 8 (1984), pp. 57-71.

agus

7088.
Boyle (Daniel): Ach and agus as coordinate and subordinate conjunctions in Gaelic.
12400.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): La conservation d’un hébraïsme dans les traductions celtiques de la Bible.
In Lalies 3 (1984), pp. 71–79.
A comparison of the adverbial clause of the type OIr. os mé... etc. with the corresponding Hebrew idiom.

agus (is) (= Engl. and)

376.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Agus (is)/and: a shared syntactic feature.
In Celtica 16 (1984), pp. 125–137.
As followed by (1) a nominative absolute type of construction, (2) a verbal-noun / infinitive type of construction.

ah (numeral particle)

11042.
Cox (Richard A. V.): Eachdraidh is tùs a’ mhír àireamhail ann an Gàidhlig (na h-Albann).
In SGS 28 (2011), pp. 254–306.

Ahab (King)

1416.
Poppe (Erich): Varia: II. King Ahab, Boia, Mac Da Thó and Ailill.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 169–171.
The beginning of the biblical story of Ahab and Jezebel concerning wives’ advice (1 Kings, 21.4-5) served as a model in Wales and in Ireland (e.g. Scéla muicce Meic Da Thó, Fled Bricrenn).

ahæ(interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

ahé (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

2658.
Testen (D.): Palatalization and the Irish ā-stem.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 272–279.
Argues that the declension of the oblique cases of the OIr. ā-stems can be derived regularly from Indo-European with the intervention of the analogical spread to the nominal inflection of an extended stem in *-osiā- based on the forms here postulated for the accusative, genitive and dative of the 3rd sg. fem. demonstrative pronoun.
3668.
Falileyev (Alexander): Father of muse and son of inspiration.
In StC 32 (1998), pp. 277–278.
Discusses OIr. mac uad (Corm. Y 599) and its relationship to W tad awen (in Talhaearn’s epithet Tat Aguen).

aí ḟresligi

7072.
Breatnach (Liam): Araile felmac féig don Mumain: unruly pupils and the limitations of satire.
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 111–136.
From TCD MS H 3. 18. Includes poem (4qq.) Oidh ar huilleth n-oīsmentai, with a discussion of the metre aí ḟresligi; with English translation and notes. Cf. K. Meyer's edition (in ZCP 7.304 [Best1, p. 122]).

-a(í) (pl.)

1213.
Ó Curnáin (Brian): Draíocht uimhreacha: anailís shóinseálach ar dheilbhíocht iolra an ainmfhocail i gcanúint Iorras Aithneach.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 161–204.
A quantitative variable analysis of the nominal plural in the Irish of Iorras Aithneach; relevance of social networks discussed: -cha(í), -a(í), extension in (t)r.

ai trasgartha (or trasgairthe)

17996.
Hoyne (Mícheál): Early Modern Irish miscellanea: 3. Áoi trasgartha.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 178–183.
On the distinction of words earlier written with ai (which later became oi but did not retain a variant in ai) and also with (later written áoi), responsible for various metrical licences.

aibghitir

732.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Irish words for ‘alphabet’.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 100–110.
The relation of aibítir, aibidir, aibidil, etc. to EModIr. aibghitir < OIr. aibgitir.

aibgitir

732.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Irish words for ‘alphabet’.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 100–110.
The relation of aibítir, aibidir, aibidil, etc. to EModIr. aibghitir < OIr. aibgitir.

-a(i)bh (ScG)

626.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): ‘Siubhadaibh a bhalachaibh! Tha an suirbhidh a-nis ullamh agaibh’: mar a dh’éirich do -bh, -mh gun chudrom ann an Gàidhlig Alba.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 61–74.
The development of unstressed -a(i)bh, -amh to -i and -u in ScG. Fuller version publ. in Scottish Gaelic Studies 21 (2003) 163-219.

aibidil

732.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Irish words for ‘alphabet’.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 100–110.
The relation of aibítir, aibidir, aibidil, etc. to EModIr. aibghitir < OIr. aibgitir.

aibidir

732.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Irish words for ‘alphabet’.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 100–110.
The relation of aibítir, aibidir, aibidil, etc. to EModIr. aibghitir < OIr. aibgitir.

aibítir

732.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Irish words for ‘alphabet’.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 100–110.
The relation of aibítir, aibidir, aibidil, etc. to EModIr. aibghitir < OIr. aibgitir.

aicci

3019.
Hamilton (John Noel): Varia (Alt- und Mittelirisches): 2. A passage in Immram Máile Dúin.
In ZCP 32 (1972), p. 121.
na aicci in A. G. van Hamel's edition (p. 50, l. 837 [Best2 1252]) to be translated as ‘in a short while, in a moment’.

aicned

10807.
Boyle (Elizabeth): Neoplatonic thought in medieval Ireland: the evidence of Scéla na esérgi.
In Medium ævum 78/2 (2009), pp. 216–230.
With a study of the author’s philosophical vocabulary, focusing on the terms dliged, folud, aicned, umallóit, teorfegad.

-(a)id (3 pl.)

898.
McGonagle (Noel): Migration of verbal terminations.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 93–97.
On the analogical spread of certain verbal endings, some of which gain independent pronominal status, e.g. -(e)as (1 sg.); -(a)is, -(a)inns, -(a)ir, -, -f(a)í (2 sg.); (-)mar, -(e)amuid, -muis(t) (1 pl.); (-)dar, -(a)id, -dís(t) (3 pl.); -f(e)á, -tf(a)í (impers.); -f(e)ar, -(e)adh, -(e)as (impers.) with irregular verbs; -t(e)ars, -th(e)ars, -f(e)ars (impers.).

aided

2764.
Mikhailova (Tatiana), Nikolaeva (Natalia): The denotations of death in Goidelic: to the question of Celtic eschatological conceptions.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 93–115.
Studies the etymology and semantics of Irish expressions denoting ‘death’ as occurring in the texts, with the aim of retrieving the Celtic attitudes towards death.

Aided Chon Roí

17021.
Tymoczko (Maria) (trans.): Two death tales from the Ulster cycle: the death of Cú Roí and the death of Cú Chulainn / translated by Maria Tymoczko from the Irish.
DT, 2. Dublin: Dolmen Press, 1981. 254 pp. (Dolmen texts, 2).

aidemm/aidimm

1864.
de Barra (Séamas): Nótaí ar an bhfocal gúm.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 232–240.
Gúm(á); d’úma is, dúmas/thúmas; d’aon audhm’; d’aon úim, d’aon aidhim; i dtom(h)as; tom(h)as.

-(a)idh

1564.
McGonagle (Noel): Some present tense terminations.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 203–214.
1. -(a)idh / -(e)ann; 2. -(e)anntar; 3. -(e)anns.

aidmillid

1001.
Borsje (Jacqueline), Kelly (Fergus): ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish literature and law.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 1–39.
Part I (pp. 1-33) by J.B.: Early Irish examples of the evil eye: 1. The destructive eye [súil miledach, Birugderc, súil milltech, súil neimnech, possibly túathcháech]; 2. The angry eye [déccain aindíaraid, súil (fhéig) andíaraid]; 3. Casting the evil eye [millid, aidmillid; corrguinecht also discussed]; 4. Envy and the evil eye [for-moinethar, drochrosc, drochshúil]; 5. Protection against the evil eye. Part II (pp. 34-39) by F.K.: ‘The evil eye’ in early Irish law: a section of legal commentary (dating from around the twelfth century) attached to a four-word quotation from an Old Irish law text (No etlod tri ormath ‘Or stealing away through envy’), ed. with transl. and notes from MSS Rawlinson B 506 and TCD H 3. 18; cf. CIH i 144.34-145.5; ii 673.3-10; iii 955.1-8, 1051.17-23.

Aifrinn

5032.
Mac Aodha (Breandán S.): The priest and the Mass in Irish place-names.
In Nomina 14 (1990), pp. 77–82.
sagart, Aifrinn as place-name elements.

aig thaig

1499.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Techt tuidecht.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 1–6.
On ‘rhyming jingles’, often consisting of nominalised imperatives, e.g. techt tuidecht, aig thaig, soí toí, áin tháin (ám [t]hám in LL 34840 corrupt); cf. sa(i)n cha(i)n, baí chaí, ócaib tócaib — all denoting `(quick) movement to and fro’. Some discussion of rhyming combinations of two words in ModIr.

aige

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

aige fine

3789.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 6. Der irische “Pfeiler der Sippe” und das nt-Verbaladjektiv in der gallischen Inschrift von Plumergat.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 101–103.
Finds a Gaulish parallel (in RIG L-15) to the metaphorical use of OIr. áige ‘pillar’ in the legal term aige fine.

áige ‘post, prop, pillar’

3789.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Spuren gemeinkeltischer Kultur im Wortschatz: 6. Der irische “Pfeiler der Sippe” und das nt-Verbaladjektiv in der gallischen Inschrift von Plumergat.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 101–103.
Finds a Gaulish parallel (in RIG L-15) to the metaphorical use of OIr. áige ‘pillar’ in the legal term aige fine.

aiged

14954.
Pyysalo (Jouna): Ten new Indo-European etymologies for the Celtic languages.
In SCF 12 (2015), pp. 62–79.
1. OIr. oenach- ‘an injury/wound’: OSax. ēndago- ‘day of death’: Hitt. ḫingan- ‘Seuche, Pest, Todesfall’; 2. OIr. airecht- ‘assembly, meeting, conversation’: LAv. vyāxa- ‘Versammlung’; 3. OIr. cumachtae- ‘pouvoir, puissance’: TochB. ekaññe ‘possession, equipment’, AV aṣṭi- ‘Erreichung’; 4. OIr. ás- ‘croissance, fait de grandir/grossir’: Maced. ἄξο- ‘ὑλή'; 5. OBret. iolent ‘precentur’: Lat. hariolā- ‘wahrsagen’; 6. MidIr. cīch- (f.) ‘weibliche Brust’: RV. kı̄́kasā- ‘Brust·bein’; 7. OIr. nái- ‘human being, person’: TochA. napen- ‘Mensch’; 8. OIr. tol- ‘Wille’: RV. turá- ‘Willfährig’; 9. OIr. nūadat- ‘hand, wrist or arm’: RV. nodhā- ‘Elefant’; 10. OIr. aiged ‘visage’: OHG agsiunî- ‘species: Aussehen, Angesicht’.

aighe

1951.
Breatnach (R. A.): Focal ar fiarlóid.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 113–117.
aghaidh and oidhe(adh) meaning ‘deserts’ in idiomatic expressions should be written an fhoighe since < OIr. foigde ‘begging’.

Followed by an Addendum to Éigse 7 (1953-55), pp. 265-6.

aighidh

1951.
Breatnach (R. A.): Focal ar fiarlóid.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 113–117.
aghaidh and oidhe(adh) meaning ‘deserts’ in idiomatic expressions should be written an fhoighe since < OIr. foigde ‘begging’.

Followed by an Addendum to Éigse 7 (1953-55), pp. 265-6.

aigid

2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

-(a)igidir

14178.
Joseph (Lionel S.): The origin of the Celtic denominatives in *-sag-.
In Cowgill studies (1987), pp. 113–159.
Part I: Old Irish [on the -(a)igithir type].

aigillne

1617.
Gerriets (Marilyn): Economy and society: clientship according to the Irish laws.
In CMCS 6 (Winter 1983), pp. 43–61.
Analysis of obligations of aicillne ‘base clientship’ and choice of clientship partner based on Críth gablach, Cáin aicillne and other legal texts.

-(a)igithir

14178.
Joseph (Lionel S.): The origin of the Celtic denominatives in *-sag-.
In Cowgill studies (1987), pp. 113–159.
Part I: Old Irish [on the -(a)igithir type].

aigne

1810.
Binchy (Daniel A.): Féchem, fethem, aigne.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 18–33.

aigseradh

3414.
Quin (E. G.): Three notes: 3. Ad Celtica 14, 132.
In Celtica 15 (1983), p. 141.
Further notes on variant readings aigseradh and imgnadad from ed. of poem Día mór dom imdegail.

-áil

318.
Ó Cuív (Brian): The verbal noun ending -áil and related forms.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 125–145.
Suggests a variety of sources for the -áil element in Irish.
404.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 57–68.
1. Roinnt focal in -éad; 2. Dhá fhocal in -ús; 3. vardrús agus faithlios; 4. bab/bob; 5. lúmanaí; 6. raiclín; 7. Cúig ainm bhriathartha in -áil (siobáil, raitleáil, babáil, cuileáil, fraeicsáil); 8. gaillseach < gaibhlseach; 9. locáiste.
17201.
Pődör (Dóra): Productivity in verbal noun formation in Irish: some problems concerning the investigation of the spread of the -áil suffix.
In SKASE-JTL 12/1 (2015), pp. 103–108.

ail

1191.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. Goidelic alt and allt.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 207–209.
1. all ‘rock, cliff’; 2. ail ‘rock’; 3. alt ‘joint, etc’; 4. allt ‘height, cliff’; 5. alt and allt contrasted. Also on the contrast between ‘lenited’ l and ‘unlenited’ ll before t in OIr. (vs. GOI, 74).
2725.
Hamp (Eric P.): On North European *ɔ in Celtic.
In ZCP 46 (1994), pp. 11–12.
Argues that European *ɔ > *o before high vowels (nom. muir *mori-, with raising) but > *a before non-high vowels (gen. muir < *maro-).

ailad

15230.
Eska (Charlene M.): On the swearing of oaths in cemeteries.
In CMCS 71 (Summer 2016), pp. 59–70.
Argues that reilic in the legal commentary found in CIH iii 820.42-821.5 refers not to cemeteries but to the the making of oaths on relics.

Ailbe

479.
Dumville (David N.): Two troublesome abbots.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 146–152.
1. Cumméne, Abbot of Iona (657-69) [Epithet `Ailbe' reflects Lat. albus, Ir fionn]; 2. Flann, Abbot of Clonmacnoise (?724-732/3) [on the epithets Sinna(e) and Fíne / Fína].

Ailbe, St.

11416.
Schaffer (Bridgitte): Statements of power in the language of genealogy: St. Ailbe’s roots.
In Quaestio insularis 5 (2004), pp. 23–41.

ailcith

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

ailean (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

Ailech

12312.
Tierney (Andrew): A note on the identification of Aileach.
In JRSAI 133 (2003), pp. 182–186.
12304.
Lacey (Brian): The Grianán of Aileach: a note on its identification.
In JRSAI 131 (2001), pp. 145–149.
12357.
Hudson (B. T.): Elech and the Scots in Strathclyde.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 145–149.

Ailech Mór

12304.
Lacey (Brian): The Grianán of Aileach: a note on its identification.
In JRSAI 131 (2001), pp. 145–149.

Ailenn

4155.
Schrijver (Peter): Early Irish Ailenn: an etymology.
In Emania 20 (2006), pp. 60–61.

aili (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

Ailill

1416.
Poppe (Erich): Varia: II. King Ahab, Boia, Mac Da Thó and Ailill.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 169–171.
The beginning of the biblical story of Ahab and Jezebel concerning wives’ advice (1 Kings, 21.4-5) served as a model in Wales and in Ireland (e.g. Scéla muicce Meic Da Thó, Fled Bricrenn).
3455.
Wagner (H.): Studies in the origins of early Celtic traditions: 3. On the origin of Celtic kurmi- ‘beer’ (Ir. cuirm, W. cwrw) and of Celtic kingship.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 11–23.
Discusses the names Medb, Beltene, Ailill, Brigit.

Ailill Ólomm

2044.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The theme of lommrad in Cath Maige Mucrama.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 211–224.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 330-341.

ailithir

1812.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): The social background to Irish peregrinatio.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 43–59.
On the relationship between the peregrinus (ailithir) and Irish social organisation; distinction of two grades of peregrinatio ailithre); discussion of related terminology.


Republ. in The Otherworld voyage in early Irish literature, pp. 94-108.
1984.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Caillech and other terms for veiled women in medieval Irish texts.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 71–96.
Discusses terms in Old Irish and Latin caillech, cétmuinter, caillech aithrige, ailithir, fedb; clientella, mulier, uxor, vidua.

aill

7030.
Boutkan (D.), Kossmann (M. G.): Some Berber parallels of European substratum words.
In JIES 27/1-2 (Spring/Summer 1999), pp. 87–100.
Presents comparative evidence from Tamazight, concerning in particular the etymology of Ir. cromm, lúaide, aill, mruig, cairem.

aill (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

aillbhéal

1251.
Ua Súilleabháin (Seán): Glac bheag focal.
In Éigse 33 (2002), pp. 173–178.
1. airchisín (Pluincéad); 2. miúndáil/meanndáil/miondáil; 3. aillbhil (Pluincéad); 4. ghiúch/giúch/iúch/ (?) dhiúch/ (?) diúch; 5. creithinisí/cleathainisí/greathainisí, creathnais.

aillbhil (Plunkett)

1251.
Ua Súilleabháin (Seán): Glac bheag focal.
In Éigse 33 (2002), pp. 173–178.
1. airchisín (Pluincéad); 2. miúndáil/meanndáil/miondáil; 3. aillbhil (Pluincéad); 4. ghiúch/giúch/iúch/ (?) dhiúch/ (?) diúch; 5. creithinisí/cleathainisí/greathainisí, creathnais.

aillse

15855.
Ní Chrábhagáin (Ciara): Disease and illness in medieval Ireland: an anthropological examination of some hagiographical material.
In RíM 24 (2013), pp. 115–133.
Examines the usage of names of illnesses and diseases occurring in the text of Bethada náem nÉrenn: 1. amlabar, bacach, bodhar, clamhdall, lobhar; 2. aillse, fiolun fionn, easbadha, cuthach; scamach, lirach, moirtin marbh, bás obann, ifreann; esláinte theinntidhe, galar cos, demhan.

ailm

218.
de Bhaldraithe (T.): Palmaire agus focail eile.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 76–81.
1. palmaire/falmaire/falmaireacht; 2. fámaire/fámaireacht; 3. palmaire/falmaire; 4. falmadóir/halmadóir; 5. failm/ailm; 6. pailméar; 7. pám; 8. tailm/sailm/failm.
1052.
McManus (Damian): Irish letter-names and their kennings.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 127–168.
Edition of Bríatharogaim, including glossing and commentary, from MSS RIA 23 P 12, NLI G 53, TCD H 3. 18, and YBL; with translation and notes. Discussion of each of the names: Beithe, Luis, Fern, Sail, Nin, (h)Úath, Dair, Tinne, Coll, Cert, Muin, Gort, Gétal, Straiph, Ruis, Ailm, Onn, Ú(i)r, Edad (?), Idad (?), Ébad (?), Ó(i)r, Uil(l)en(n), Pín (Iphín), Iphín (Pín), Emancholl.
2646.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 3. Spanish álamo.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 277–279.
Compares Sp. álamo ‘poplar’ (<*almo-) to OIr. ailm ‘pine tree’.

áilsedach

1568.
Williams (N. J. A.): Nóta sanasaíochta.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 235–237.
Suggests éisde(a)lbhach, éiseal(l)ach, éistealach ‘fastidious’ < éisle(a)dach ‘neglectful’; cf. áilsedach, éislesach ‘neglectful’.

aimser

17446.
Stifter (David): Varia: II. The origin of time.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 219–226.
Discusses the etymology of OIr. amm and aimser.

aín

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

áin tháin

1499.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Techt tuidecht.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 1–6.
On ‘rhyming jingles’, often consisting of nominalised imperatives, e.g. techt tuidecht, aig thaig, soí toí, áin tháin (ám [t]hám in LL 34840 corrupt); cf. sa(i)n cha(i)n, baí chaí, ócaib tócaib — all denoting `(quick) movement to and fro’. Some discussion of rhyming combinations of two words in ModIr.

ainb

1127.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: V. 2. The flexion of ainb ‘ignorant’.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 140–141.
Gen. sg. and pl. anfed.

aincheas

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

ainder

10273.
Cowan (H. K. J.): The affinities of non-Celtic Pictish.
In LB 73 (1984), pp. 433–488.
§6: Non-IE words in Insular Celtic [discusses ainder, carr, carra, carrac, carn, cala (ScG), barra (ScG), cuan, adarc, mothar, land]; §7: Non-IE names in Scotland [discusses Alba(n), Isla, Sale, Caledonia, etc.].
18495.
Schrijver (Peter): Irish ainder, Welsh anner, Breton annoar, Basque andere.
In Fs. Vennemann (2002), pp. 205–219.

aineach

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

ainfial

3336.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 11. anbal.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 282–283.
On the variation anbal/ainfial and stem-initial f- after the privative particle an-.

ainimm

4770.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (1. Teil).
In Sprache 43/2 (2002–2003), pp. 171–211.
Collects and analyses instances of agent nouns in -em: Prototypen bzw. frühere Bildungen (ainim(m)/anaim(m), talam); Bekannte und gesicherte -amon und -(i)i̯amon-Bildungen (airem, betham, brithem, cairem, dáilem, dúilem, féchem, fethem, flaithem, glaídem, legam, luam, medam, mraithem, orb(b)am, súainem).

Continued in Die Sprache 44 (2004), 26-69.

Ainlí

11704.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Uí Ainlí, taoisigh chineál dofa, sna ginealach agus sna hannála.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 807–862.

Ainlighe

11704.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Uí Ainlí, taoisigh chineál dofa, sna ginealach agus sna hannála.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 807–862.

ainm

2685.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III. Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 5. Forms of the word ainm.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 159–160.
Dat. pl. anmaibh.
3188.
Byrd (Andrew Miles): Return to dative anmaimm.
In Ériu 56 (2006), pp. 145–155.
Discusses the origin of the ending -(a)im(m) of the dative singular of Old Irish neuter n-stems, providing substantiation for C. Marstrander's suggestion (in Ériu 5 (1911), p. 200) of an assimilation of *-mmVn# to *-mmVm#.
2810.
Ködderitzsch (Rolf): Indo-iranisch-keltische Übereinstimmungen.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 382–395.
Discusses seven morphological and syntactical features already touched upon by W. Meid (cf. BILL 470, pp. 45-56). With regard to Old Irish, these are: 1. the gaisced type of neuter singular dvandva; 2. the morphology of rígain; 3. the ending *-s of the genitive singular of the neuter n-stems; 4. the feminine forms of the numerals ‘3’ and ‘4’; 5. the reduplicated s-future; 6. the perfect formation -ánaicc; 7. the elliptic construction conráncatar ocus Dubthach.

ainm coimhleanamhna

11990.
McManus (Damian): Varia: II. The ainm coimhleanamhna.
In Ériu 62 (2012), pp. 189–195.
ad IGT ii §124; refers to restrictions in the form of the acc. and dat. sg. of móin, cluain, coill when they are used as placename elements.

ainmech

17225.
Hamp (Eric P.): Slavic *mokrъ, Irish ainmech ‘wet, rain’.
In Slavia Centralis 4/1 (2011), pp. 69–71.
Demonstrates the etymological connections among Baltic, Slavic, Albanian, and Celtic for the term ‘wet’, reflected in PIE *mek- ( ∼ *mok-).

ainmne ('forbearance, patience’)

351.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The theme of ainmne in Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 78–87.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 342-351.

ainneart (ScG)

1906.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Rhyming vowels before long liquids in Scottish Gaelic.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 131–146.
1. ui : [uː]; 2. [au] : [ai]; 3. ainneart; 4. ceannard; 5. bínne, línne; cunnart.

-(a)inns (2 sg.)

898.
McGonagle (Noel): Migration of verbal terminations.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 93–97.
On the analogical spread of certain verbal endings, some of which gain independent pronominal status, e.g. -(e)as (1 sg.); -(a)is, -(a)inns, -(a)ir, -, -f(a)í (2 sg.); (-)mar, -(e)amuid, -muis(t) (1 pl.); (-)dar, -(a)id, -dís(t) (3 pl.); -f(e)á, -tf(a)í (impers.); -f(e)ar, -(e)adh, -(e)as (impers.) with irregular verbs; -t(e)ars, -th(e)ars, -f(e)ars (impers.).

ainsiléad

1704.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Roinnt focal ón iasacht.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 319–325.
1. ainsiléad; 2. bindealán; 3. buimbéal; 4. bumbal, buimiléad; 5. fáiméad, páiméad; 6. fúinniméad, fúinniméadach; 7. líméar; 8. lindéar; 9. lipéad; 10. scipéad; 11. spiara; 12. spícéad; 13. straiféad; 14. stráisiún; 15. stroimpiléad; 16. strúiméad, stráiméad; 17. struipléad.
1855.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Roinnt focal iasachta sa Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 158–166.
1. beargún/beirgiún/biorgún; 2. béitín/béitíne; 3. meá/meadh/midh/meath; 4. infear; 5. stilliúr; 6. ainsiléad; 7. luaidhe; 8. spéir.

air-

1163.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Varia: III. Vocalic variation in air-, aur-.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 163–169.
3294.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 3. airlicud.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 167–169.
air- intensifies or specifies the sense of ‘lending’.
8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

air

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

-(a)ir (2 sg.)

898.
McGonagle (Noel): Migration of verbal terminations.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 93–97.
On the analogical spread of certain verbal endings, some of which gain independent pronominal status, e.g. -(e)as (1 sg.); -(a)is, -(a)inns, -(a)ir, -, -f(a)í (2 sg.); (-)mar, -(e)amuid, -muis(t) (1 pl.); (-)dar, -(a)id, -dís(t) (3 pl.); -f(e)á, -tf(a)í (impers.); -f(e)ar, -(e)adh, -(e)as (impers.) with irregular verbs; -t(e)ars, -th(e)ars, -f(e)ars (impers.).

air (ScG)

11231.
Reed (Sylvia L.): Multiple perfects in Scottish Gaelic.
In WCCFL 29 (2012), pp. 389–397.
Investigates the aspectual semantics of the ScG particles air, as dèidh, gu.

airaiccecht

12465.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Old Irish airaiccecht ‘primer, etc.'.
In Medieval Irish law (2013), pp. 221–236.

airbe

13048.
Wallace (Patrick F.): Garrda and airbeada: the plot thickens in Viking Dublin.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 261–274.
Investigates the possible difference in meaning between these two terms for land demarcations, in the context of the sources where they are used.
3225.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Some words for `(man-made) ridge’ in Irish: fu(i)th(a)irbe; immaire; indra, indrad.
In BBCS 26/4 (May 1976), pp. 445–449.

airbeada

13048.
Wallace (Patrick F.): Garrda and airbeada: the plot thickens in Viking Dublin.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 261–274.
Investigates the possible difference in meaning between these two terms for land demarcations, in the context of the sources where they are used.

airchinnech

1387.
Davies (Wendy): Clerics as rulers: some implications of the terminology of ecclesiastical authority in early medieval Ireland.
In Latin and the vernacular in early medieval Britain (1982), pp. 81–97.
Discusses implications of the use of certain words in sixth-, seventh- and early eighth-century Ireland, e.g. Lat. princeps, principatus, census, ius, regnum and Ir. toísigecht [sic leg.], flaith, flaithem, flaithemnacht, airchinnech, etc.
1374.
Sharpe (Richard): Some problems concerning the organisation of the Church in early medieval Ireland.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 230–270.
Discusses ecclesiastical terminology (e.g. Lat. paruchia, familia, dominicus (> Ir. domnach), princeps, Ir. airchinnech, epscop tuaithe (cf. Lat. clericus plebis), etc.) and the impact of monasticism.
7406.
Jefferies (Henry A.): Erenaghs and termonlands: another early seventeenth-century account.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 55–58.
Extract of a letter in English (1609) by archbishop William Daniell, entitled De herenachis et Termon lands and containing a discussion of the terms termonn, coarb and airchinnech. From MS TCD E 3. 16, f. 78v.
14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

airchisín (ghost word)

1251.
Ua Súilleabháin (Seán): Glac bheag focal.
In Éigse 33 (2002), pp. 173–178.
1. airchisín (Pluincéad); 2. miúndáil/meanndáil/miondáil; 3. aillbhil (Pluincéad); 4. ghiúch/giúch/iúch/ (?) dhiúch/ (?) diúch; 5. creithinisí/cleathainisí/greathainisí, creathnais.

airciub

673.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. Syntactic comparisons: (a) airci(u)bargibercib.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 168–169.
ad J. Carney, in Ériu 18 (1958), pp. 1-43 (BILL 5527). Discusses forms of the 2 pl. ipv.

airci(u)b

1165.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Varia: IV. 2. On the 2pl. imperative in Scottish Gaelic.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 174–178.
ScG -ibh derives from 2pl. prep. prons used as imperatives, the seeds of which can be traced to OIr. suppletive airci(u)b, argib, ercib ‘go’.

Aird

1151.
Hughes (A. J.): Varia: V. The geographical location of the fortúatha Ulad of Lebor na Cert.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 149–151.
Identifies their territory as being the Ards Peninsula (Aird); emends a Forthuathaib arda to a Forthuathaib Arda in poem beg. Dligid ríg Eamna acus Ulad (Lebor na Cert: The Book of Rights, ed. by M. Dillon (Dublin, 1962) l. 1376).

aird

11718.
Breeze (Andrew): Art ‘direction’ in St Erkenwald.
In N&Q 55/3 (Sep. 2008), p. 273.
< Ir. aird.

airdam

1375.
MacDonald (A. D. S.): Aspects of the monastery and monastic life in Adomnán’s Life of Columba.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 271–302.
Discussion of Adomnán’s terms for physical features of monasteries. [1.] The monastery (e.g. Lat. monasterium, cenubium, cella, cellula, ec(c)lesia); [2.] The church and cemetery (e.g. Lat. ec(c)lesia, oratorium, exedra (cf. ? Ir. airdam), cubiculum); [3.] The domestic buildings (e.g. Lat. monasterium, magna domus, domus, domucula, hospitium / hospitiolum, habitaculum, lectulus); [4.] The plate(ol)a monasterii; [5.] Desertum and peregrinatio (e.g. desertum (> OIr. dísert), herimum).
13029.
Manning (Conleth): References to church buildings in the Annals.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 37–52.
Studies the occurrence of the following terms: oratorium; dairthech; damliac; teampall, templum; eclais; erdamh, airdam; taigi aernaighi; cell, civitas; recles.

Áirdean

4553.
Sterckx (Claude): Diane Arduenna: la divine Ardenne.
In Ollodagos 8/1 (1995), pp. 49–83.

Áirden

4553.
Sterckx (Claude): Diane Arduenna: la divine Ardenne.
In Ollodagos 8/1 (1995), pp. 49–83.

airdrech

1926.
Sayers (William): Airdrech, sirite, and other early Irish battlefield spirits.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 45–55.
With discussion of related terms.

airdrinn

10524.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): The phonology of rinn and airdrinn.
In ZCP 58 (2011), pp. 129–164.
Argues that five short vowels were distinguished in unstressed position in Middle and Early Modern Irish poetics.

aire

3144.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Préverbes gaulois suffixes en -io-: ambio, ario-, cantio-.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 115–121.
Examines the Continental Celtic background of nouns derived from prepositions (in particular ar, imm, cét-); also discusses Old Irish compound verbs with petrified neuter infix pronoung (ara-chrin, imme-airic, ceta-bí).
849.
Russell (Paul): Varia: I. 1. Prepositional derivatives in Irish.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 163–166.
[1.] aitire ` surtetyship, surety’; [2.] aire (i) ? ‘lack / increase’, (ii) ‘watching over’.
4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.
17601.
Granucci (Fiorenza): Appunti di lessicologia celtica: irlandese aire ‘uomo libero’, muire ‘capo’, ruire ‘re supremo’.
In Fs. Mastrelli (1994), pp. 113–124.

-aire

9522.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The suffix -aire in Irish personal names.
In A companion in linguistics [Fs. Ahlqvist] (2005), pp. 152–156.
487.
Kelly (Fergus): A note on Old Irish círmaire.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 231–233.
Argues this form (< cír ‘comb’) contains two agentive suffixes (-am and -aire).

aire coisring

2407.
Stacey (Robin Chapman): Ties that bind: immunities in Irish and Welsh law.
In CMCS 20 (Winter 1990), pp. 39–60.
On the protection of transactions against claims in Ir. contractual law. Apps. contain details on (I) natural entitlement, (II) unwarranted promises, and (III) the aire coisring.

aire cosring

3168.
Henry (P. L.): Interpreting Críth gablach: 3. aire cosring.
In ZCP 36 (1978), pp. 60–62.
Takes con ·srenga, coisreng in CG line 277 as the equivalents of Lat. contrahit, contractus ‘makes a contract, contract’.

aire échta

12471.
McLeod (Neil): The lord of slaughter.
In Land beneath the sea [Ahlqvist essays] (2013), pp. 101–114.

airecht

10744.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Resonants and ‘laryngeals’: a note on the Indo-European origin of a Celtic verb stem.
In IF 109 (2004), pp. 311–336.
On the etym. of OIr. airecht.
14954.
Pyysalo (Jouna): Ten new Indo-European etymologies for the Celtic languages.
In SCF 12 (2015), pp. 62–79.
1. OIr. oenach- ‘an injury/wound’: OSax. ēndago- ‘day of death’: Hitt. ḫingan- ‘Seuche, Pest, Todesfall’; 2. OIr. airecht- ‘assembly, meeting, conversation’: LAv. vyāxa- ‘Versammlung’; 3. OIr. cumachtae- ‘pouvoir, puissance’: TochB. ekaññe ‘possession, equipment’, AV aṣṭi- ‘Erreichung’; 4. OIr. ás- ‘croissance, fait de grandir/grossir’: Maced. ἄξο- ‘ὑλή'; 5. OBret. iolent ‘precentur’: Lat. hariolā- ‘wahrsagen’; 6. MidIr. cīch- (f.) ‘weibliche Brust’: RV. kı̄́kasā- ‘Brust·bein’; 7. OIr. nái- ‘human being, person’: TochA. napen- ‘Mensch’; 8. OIr. tol- ‘Wille’: RV. turá- ‘Willfährig’; 9. OIr. nūadat- ‘hand, wrist or arm’: RV. nodhā- ‘Elefant’; 10. OIr. aiged ‘visage’: OHG agsiunî- ‘species: Aussehen, Angesicht’.

airecht (in place names)

4494.
Barrow (G. W. S.): Popular courts in early medieval Scotland: some suggested place-name evidence.
In ScS 25 (1981), pp. 1–24.
Discusses the ScG term comhdhail as place-name element.

Add. & corr. in ScS 27 (1983), 67-68.

airegar

2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

airem

4770.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (1. Teil).
In Sprache 43/2 (2002–2003), pp. 171–211.
Collects and analyses instances of agent nouns in -em: Prototypen bzw. frühere Bildungen (ainim(m)/anaim(m), talam); Bekannte und gesicherte -amon und -(i)i̯amon-Bildungen (airem, betham, brithem, cairem, dáilem, dúilem, féchem, fethem, flaithem, glaídem, legam, luam, medam, mraithem, orb(b)am, súainem).

Continued in Die Sprache 44 (2004), 26-69.

aires

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

airesc

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

airgatlám

8649.
Zimmer (Stefan): The making of myth: Old Irish airgatlám, Welsh llaw, Caledonian Ἀργεντοκόξος.
In Ogma [Fs. Ní Chatháin] (2002), pp. 295–297.

áirge

5001.
Fellows Jensen (Gillian): Common Gaelic áirge, Old Scandinavian ǽrgi or erg?
In Nomina 4 (1980), pp. 67–74.
An Old Norse borrowing from Old Irish.
3721.
Lockwood (W. B.): Chr. Matras’ studies on the Gaelic element in Faroese: conclusions and results.
In SGS 13/1 (Autumn 1978), pp. 112–126.
Surveys eight publications by Christian Matras (1900-1988) on Irish loan words in Faeroese, focusing particularly on the loans from dronn, bláthach, *slabac, dais, cró, tarb, ScG làmh chearr (< OIr. *lám cherr), muirean (or muirín, muiríneach, etc.), sopp, áirge.
Matras (Christian) (ref.)

airgead (an airgead)

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

Airgoen

4553.
Sterckx (Claude): Diane Arduenna: la divine Ardenne.
In Ollodagos 8/1 (1995), pp. 49–83.

airid

3143.
Hamp (Eric P.): Old Irish arbar n. ‘corn’.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 89–90.

airig fedo

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

àirigh (ScG)

5001.
Fellows Jensen (Gillian): Common Gaelic áirge, Old Scandinavian ǽrgi or erg?
In Nomina 4 (1980), pp. 67–74.
An Old Norse borrowing from Old Irish.

airigh (ScG)

10682.
Fraser (Ian A.): The agricultural element in Gaelic place-names.
In TGSI 57 (1990–1992), pp. 203–223; 58 (1993–1994), pp. 223-246.
The arable lands [ScG achadh, dail, goirtean, gead, io(dh)lann, claigionn, losaid, etc.]; The grazing lands [ScG ailean, bàrd, blàr, cluain, innis, lòn, machair, morbhach, magh, etc.]; Animal enclosures [ScG buaile, crò, cuithe/cuidhe, etc.]; Transhumance names [ScG airigh, rinn/roinn, both(an), sgail, etc.].

airlann

2153.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Latin grammar and native learning.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [Fs. Carney] (1989), pp. 1–6.
Includes a discussion of the terminology in Auraicept na n-éces, specially of airlann.

airliciud

12548.
McLeod (Neil): Ón and airliciud: loans in medieval Irish law.
In Celts and their cultures at home and abroad [Fs. Malcolm Broun] (2013), pp. 169–196.
Suggests that the airliciud is different from the ón in that the former involves proprietary rights (rather than merely possessory) and included the right to alienate the property to a third party.

airlicud

3294.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 3. airlicud.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 167–169.
air- intensifies or specifies the sense of ‘lending’.

airmid

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

airmnecht (ghost word)

1936.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 160–164.
1. *airmnecht; 2. crioslach; 3. daorach; 4. fabhairne; 5. fearacht; 6. imirt; 7. isteal; 8. praistéal.

airnaidm

4756.
Eska (Charlene M.): Non-lawful betrothals in early Irish law.
In KF 3 (2008), pp. 33–43.
Discusses the three types of betrothal mentioned in CIH i 144.10-17 (with English translation).

airne

2757.
Blažek (Václav): Celtic-Anatolian isoglosses.
In ZCP 52 (2001), pp. 125–128.
1. Old Irish airne ‘stone’ : Anatolian *pḗr, obl. *parno ‘house’; 2. Celtic *lāti- ‘warrior, hero’ : Anatolian *latti- ‘tribal troop(s)'.

áirne

4226.
Hamp (Eric P.): áru, áirne.
In Lochlann 6 (1974), pp. 122–123.
Postulates a Celtic etymon *agrēn-.

airneán

13972.
Briody (Mícheál): The Gaelic story-teller and Séamus Ó Duilearga’s views on the role and antiquity of airneán.
In Béascna 8 (2013), pp. 1–33.

airnem

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

airsheng

10894.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): On the possible origins of Scottish Gaelic iorram ‘rowing song’.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 2 (2006), pp. 232–288.

airtach

10520.
Bisagni (Jacopo): A note on the end of the world: Tírechán’s dies erdathe.
In ZCP 58 (2011), pp. 9–18.
ad §12 (as ed. by L. Bieler 1979 [The Patrician texts in the Book of Armagh]); erdathe is interpreted as the gen. sg. of erdath, derived from PC *-dātū, containing the PIE root *dhu̯eh2- ‘to make smoke’.

airtem

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

airthrom

10894.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): On the possible origins of Scottish Gaelic iorram ‘rowing song’.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 2 (2006), pp. 232–288.

-(a)is (2 sg.)

898.
McGonagle (Noel): Migration of verbal terminations.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 93–97.
On the analogical spread of certain verbal endings, some of which gain independent pronominal status, e.g. -(e)as (1 sg.); -(a)is, -(a)inns, -(a)ir, -, -f(a)í (2 sg.); (-)mar, -(e)amuid, -muis(t) (1 pl.); (-)dar, -(a)id, -dís(t) (3 pl.); -f(e)á, -tf(a)í (impers.); -f(e)ar, -(e)adh, -(e)as (impers.) with irregular verbs; -t(e)ars, -th(e)ars, -f(e)ars (impers.).

ais (ghost-word)

9109.
Stifter (David): Zwei Geisterwagen.
In SEC 11 (2006), pp. 141–156.
I. ais [(cf. LEIA A-50 ais “voiture” ;) argues is a ghost-word]. II. cul [suggests an origin from *kalu- ‘Schmiedearbeit, geschmiedetes Teil’].

aisc

3330.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 5. escaid, aisc.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 273–275.
ad M. A. O’Brien, in Celtica 3 (1956), pp. 171-172 (BILL 1822).

aisling

3673.
Mahon (William J.): The aisling elegy and the poet’s appropriation of the feminine.
In StC 34 (2000), pp. 249–270.
On the importance of elegiac conventions and female symbolism for the development of 18th c. political aisling.

Aislinge Óenguso

9549.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Knowledge and power in Aislinge Óengusso.
In Dán do oide [Ó Cléirigh essays] (1997), pp. 431–438.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 165-172.

aisnde

1075.
Joseph (Lionel S.): Varia: I. Archaic OIr. aisnde.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 179–180.
ad J. Jasanoff, TPS 84/1 (1986), pp. 132-141; aisnde ‘declare’ also belongs to class of `si-imperatives’.
Jasanoff (J.) (ref.)

áit

1276.
Bammesberger (Alfred): The etymology of Irish áit ‘place’.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 41–43.

-(a)it (passive pl.)

683.
Greene (David): Varia: II. 1. The Middle Irish preterite passive plural ending -(a)it.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 123–126.
Argues that the Old Irish 3pl. pres. abs. ending with suffixed 3sg. masc./neut. pronoun -tait was reused for the pass. pret. pl.

-(a)it, -(a)it (pl. pass. pret.)

1943.
McManus (Damian): The preterite passive plural in BST.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 13–19.
On the distinction of number in the passive preterite by means of the desinence MIr. *-(a)it, ClassModIr *-(a)id. vs L. McKenna 1944 (BILL 925), p. 192.11.

aite

2934.
Schmidt (Karl Horst): Zur Entwicklung einiger indogermanischer Verwandtschaftsnamen im Keltischen.
In ÉtC 16 (1979), pp. 117–122.
OIr. athair, máthair, aite, muimme, macc, auë.

àite (ScG)

4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.
4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

aiten

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

aith-

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

aithbhe (in place names)

8701.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Tuile and aithbhe in weir-names.
In Dinnseanchas 6 (1974–1977), p. 36.

aitheallach

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

aithechthúath

1766.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): On the Aithechthúatha tracts.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 159–165.
ad T. Ó Raithbheartaigh, Genealogical tracts 1, 1932, 107-31 (Best2 2204): diplomatic edition of the catalogue of tribal names found in the Book of Lecan, 185va 43-185b 6 and corrigenda.
3187.
O’Connor (Ralph): Searching for the moral in Bruiden Meic Da Réo.
In Ériu 56 (2006), pp. 117–143.
Discusses the textual relationship of the various versions of the story concerning the revolt by the aithechthuatha (or ‘vassal peoples’), and analyses the recension known as Bruiden Meic Da Réo (providing comparisons with the alternative recension Scél ar Chairbre Cinn Cait throughout), offering an interpretation of this narrative as a developed exemplum principis in which the conflicting elements of the kingship ideology are scrutinized.

aitheda

3549.
Martin (B. K.): Medieval Irish aitheda and Todorov’s ‘Narratologie’.
In StC 10–11 (1975–1976), pp. 138–151.

Aithem

4772.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (2. Teil).
In Sprache 44/1 (2004), pp. 26–69.
Hapax legomena bzw. nicht gesicherte Formen (cainim, clithem, etham, foídem, laissem, meisem/mesam, roem, sílem, sruithem, toirnem); Tierbezeichnungen (*betham, braichem, glaídem, legam, léom, sirem, toinnem, trichem/trechem); Bezeichnungen für Werkzeuge bzw. Gebrauchgegenstände (airnem, airtem, ceram, drolam, es(s)em, fíam, galam, genam/genum, 1rúam, 2rúam, súainem); Personennamen (Aithem, *Segam, *Regam, Maram, Solam); Ähnliche Bildungen (mithem, ollam); Zusammenfassung.

aithesc

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

-aithgéuin

3281.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Welsh adwaen.
In BBCS 29/4 (May 1982), pp. 684–686.
OIr. ad-géuin/-aithgéuin.

aithig fedo

1818.
Kelly (Fergus): The Old Irish tree-list.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 107–124.
Identifies the 28 trees and shrubs listed in the eighth-century legal tract Bretha comaithchesa, which are divided into four groups of seven: 1. airig fedo ‘nobles of the wood’: daur ‘oak’, coll ‘hazel’, cuilenn ‘holly’, ibar ‘yew’, uinnius ‘ash’, ochtach ‘Scots pine?', aball ‘wild apple-tree’; 2. aithig fedo ‘commoners of the wood’: fern ‘alder’, sail ‘willow’, scé ‘whitehorn, hawthorn’, cáerthann ‘rowan, mountain ash’, beithe ‘birch’, lem ‘elm’, idath ‘wild cherry?'; 3. fodla fedo ‘lower divisions of the wood’: draigen ‘blackthorn’, trom ‘elder, bore-tree’, féorus ‘spindle-tree’, findcholl ‘whitebeam?', caithne ‘arbutus, strawberry tree’, crithach ‘aspen’, crann fir ‘juniper?'; 4. losa fedo ‘bushes of the wood’: raith ‘bracken’, rait ‘bog-myrtle’, aiten ‘gorse, furze’, dris ‘bramble, blackberry’, fróech ‘heather’, gilcach ‘broom?', spín ‘wild rose?'. Also includes brief discussion of lecla and aín, variant names for ‘rushes’, and native trees and shrubs not included in the four classes.

aithinne

3056.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 28. Terms for ‘torch’ and stems for ‘kindle’: 1. OIr. a(i)thinne and atúd.
In ÉtC 24 (1987), p. 186.

aithlech

3217.
Ford (Patrick K.), Hamp (Eric P.): Welsh asswynaw and Celtic legal idiom.
In BBCS 26/2 (May 1975), pp. 147–160.
Pt.I: Discusses Welsh and Irish idioms for legally bound protection; Pt. II: Etymological discussion (particularly on Ir. aithlech, saigid, snáidid, naidm).

aithne

2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

aithneamh

4187.
Greene (David): Varia: II. 4. easnamh and aithneamh.
In Ériu 27 (1976), pp. 128–129.

aithnid ‘pledge’

2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

aithrech ‘regretful’

1866.
O’Leary (Philip): Fír fer: an internalized ethical concept in early Irish literature?
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 1–14.

aithrechus ‘regret, repentance’

1866.
O’Leary (Philip): Fír fer: an internalized ethical concept in early Irish literature?
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 1–14.

aithréos

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

aithrígad

3376.
Murray (Kevin): *Eterrí ‘intermediate king, subordinate king’.
In Peritia 15 (2001), pp. 377–378.
ad AU 840.4 = Kuno Meyer, Bruchstücke der älteren Lyrik Irlands p.10 §15 [Is hē Feidilmith in rı̄]; read eterríg.

aitire

849.
Russell (Paul): Varia: I. 1. Prepositional derivatives in Irish.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 163–166.
[1.] aitire ` surtetyship, surety’; [2.] aire (i) ? ‘lack / increase’, (ii) ‘watching over’.
15912.
Breatnach (Liam): On Old Irish collective and abstract nouns, the meaning of cétmuinter, and marriage in early mediaeval Ireland.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 1–29.
I. Discusses the use of words to signify both an abstract concept and a person who embodies it, or both a collective and an individual member of the collective: cerd, dán, díberg, flaith, grád, nemed, ráth, naidm, aitire, cland, eclais, fine, muinter; II. The meaning of cétmuinter [Argues it meant ‘spouse’ and could be applied to both husband and wife].

áitt

4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.

aitten-chaithreach

3450.
Wagner (H.): Studies in the origins of early Celtic traditions: 8. Ir. aitten-chaithreach ‘having gorse-like pubic hair’.
In Ériu 26 (1975), p. 26.

al

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

álad

743.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VI. álad ‘wound’.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 172.
ad E. P. Hamp, ‘Intensives in British Celtic and Gaulish: intensive ad- in Welsh’, StC 12-13 (1977-78), p. 6.

ala(dh)

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

álamo (Sp)

2646.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 3. Spanish álamo.
In ZCP 40 (1984), pp. 277–279.
Compares Sp. álamo ‘poplar’ (<*almo-) to OIr. ailm ‘pine tree’.

Alba

3158.
Dumville (David N.): Ireland and Britain in Táin bó Fraích.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 175–187.
Argues that Albu in this text is means ‘Britain’, not ‘Scotland’.
3513.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [4.] Welsh elfydd, elfydden, Scottish Gaelic Alba.
In BBCS 36 (1989), pp. 109–110.
4048.
Koch (John T.): Ériu, Alba and Letha: when was a language ancestral to Gaelic first spoken in Ireland?
In Emania 9 (1991), pp. 17–27.
2762.
Kalygin (Viktor): Some archaic elements of Celtic cosmology.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 70–76.
Studies the semantics of Celt. *dubno-, *albi̯o- and *bitu- (cf. OIr. bith, domun, Alba), suggesting that the use of these terms reflect an older religious idea of a dual universe composed of white and dark parts.
4895.
Koch (John T.): New thoughts on Albion, Iernē, and the Pretanic Isles.
In PHCC 6 (1986), pp. 1–28.
Discusses the following Old and Middle Irish toponyms and ethnonyms: Albu, Ériu, Letha, Goídel, Féni.
6682.
Broun (Dauvit): Dunkeld and the origin of Scottish identity.
In IR 48/2 (Autumn 1997), pp. 112–124.
On the emergence of the name Alba.
9023.
Broun (Dauvit): Alba: Pictish homeland or Irish offshoot?
In Exile and homecoming (2005), pp. 234–275.
10639.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotland in early Gaelic literature (600–1200 AD).
In TGSI 48 (1972–1974), pp. 382–394.

Alba (ScG)

10273.
Cowan (H. K. J.): The affinities of non-Celtic Pictish.
In LB 73 (1984), pp. 433–488.
§6: Non-IE words in Insular Celtic [discusses ainder, carr, carra, carrac, carn, cala (ScG), barra (ScG), cuan, adarc, mothar, land]; §7: Non-IE names in Scotland [discusses Alba(n), Isla, Sale, Caledonia, etc.].

Albain

10273.
Cowan (H. K. J.): The affinities of non-Celtic Pictish.
In LB 73 (1984), pp. 433–488.
§6: Non-IE words in Insular Celtic [discusses ainder, carr, carra, carrac, carn, cala (ScG), barra (ScG), cuan, adarc, mothar, land]; §7: Non-IE names in Scotland [discusses Alba(n), Isla, Sale, Caledonia, etc.].

Albe

3513.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [4.] Welsh elfydd, elfydden, Scottish Gaelic Alba.
In BBCS 36 (1989), pp. 109–110.

albha

1126.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: II. 2. tlú/ulú.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 130–131.

Albu

3158.
Dumville (David N.): Ireland and Britain in Táin bó Fraích.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 175–187.
Argues that Albu in this text is means ‘Britain’, not ‘Scotland’.
3513.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [4.] Welsh elfydd, elfydden, Scottish Gaelic Alba.
In BBCS 36 (1989), pp. 109–110.
2718.
Hamp (Eric P.): Welsh elfydd and albio-.
In ZCP 45 (1992), pp. 87–89.
ad W. Meid, Über Albion, elfydd, Albiorix und andere Indikatoren eines keltischen Weltbildes, in (pp. 435-439) Celtic Linguistics: Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: Readings in the Brythonic Languages, ed. by M. Ball, J. Fife, E. Poppe and J. Rowlands (Amsterdam 1990).
4048.
Koch (John T.): Ériu, Alba and Letha: when was a language ancestral to Gaelic first spoken in Ireland?
In Emania 9 (1991), pp. 17–27.
4895.
Koch (John T.): New thoughts on Albion, Iernē, and the Pretanic Isles.
In PHCC 6 (1986), pp. 1–28.
Discusses the following Old and Middle Irish toponyms and ethnonyms: Albu, Ériu, Letha, Goídel, Féni.
5042.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Nationality names in the Irish annals.
In Nomina 16 (1992–1993), pp. 49–70.
Discusses the terms Ériu, Féni, Scotti, Goídil, Cruthin, Picti, Albu, Bretain, Angli, Saxain, Frainc, Geinti, Gaill, Gall-Ghaedhil, Nordmainn, Lochlainn, Danair.
9023.
Broun (Dauvit): Alba: Pictish homeland or Irish offshoot?
In Exile and homecoming (2005), pp. 234–275.
10639.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotland in early Gaelic literature (600–1200 AD).
In TGSI 48 (1972–1974), pp. 382–394.
11309.
Koch (John T.): Celts, Britons and Gaels: names, peoples and identities.
In THSC-NS 9 (2003), pp. 41–56.

albus

479.
Dumville (David N.): Two troublesome abbots.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 146–152.
1. Cumméne, Abbot of Iona (657-69) [Epithet `Ailbe' reflects Lat. albus, Ir fionn]; 2. Flann, Abbot of Clonmacnoise (?724-732/3) [on the epithets Sinna(e) and Fíne / Fína].

Aldfrith (king)

1450.
Smyth (Alfred P.): Celtic Leinster: towards an historical geography of early Irish civilization A.D. 500–1600.
Blackrock, Co. Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1982. xvi + 197 pp. illus., plts., maps, geneal. tbls.
With an Historical atlas (16 pls). Appendix: Adomnán, king Aldfrith, and the home of the Book of Durrow.

Rev. by
K. W. Nicholls, in Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 535-558.
Patrick Wormald, in The Scottish historical review 60/2 (Oct., 1981), pp. 162-163.

ale (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

Alexander

522.
Tristram (Hildegard L. C.): More talk of Alexander.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 658–663.

Alexander the Great

1997.
Ó Macháin (Pádraig): Irish and Scottish traditions concerning Ceathrar do bhí ar uaigh an fhir.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 7–17.
On the textual tradition of the poem Ceathrar do bhí ar uaigh an fhir in Scotland (NLS Adv. 72.1.37) and Ireland (RIA F v 5, 23 L 34; Egerton 127; Maynooth M 84) and and its relationship with Fearghal Óg Mac an Bhaird’s uirsgéal in Fill th’aghuidh uainn a Éire.

alfad

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

alfalach

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

*alfat

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

álfath

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

alfáth

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

*alfhalach

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].

all

1191.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. Goidelic alt and allt.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 207–209.
1. all ‘rock, cliff’; 2. ail ‘rock’; 3. alt ‘joint, etc’; 4. allt ‘height, cliff’; 5. alt and allt contrasted. Also on the contrast between ‘lenited’ l and ‘unlenited’ ll before t in OIr. (vs. GOI, 74).
5320.
Greene (David): The chariot as described in Irish literature.
In Iron age in the Irish sea province (1972), pp. 59–73.
Discusses the terms dá ech, carpat, dá ndroch, fonnaid, sithbe, feirtsi, crett, cuing, dá n-all, clár, suide, etruide, éissi, brot.

alla (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

alla-alla (interjection)

3795.
Kelly (Fergus): Onomatopeic interjections in Early Irish.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 88–107.
Discusses the use of 24 interjections, presented in alphabetical order.

allabrig n-aí

886.
Russell (Paul): Varia: I. 2. no allabrig n-aí (Bechbretha §§6, 25).
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 166–168.
Tentatively translates allabrig n-aí as ‘one of the two bríg'.

allas

10722.
Berman (Howard), Hamp (Eric P.): Old Irish allas, Hittite allaniya-.
In IF 87 (1982), pp. 124–126.

alliteration (complex)

798.
Sproule (David): Complex alliteration in Gruibne’s roscad.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 157–160.
Analysis of alliterative patterns in roscad beg. Fo chen a Chonaill cháin Chuirc.

allt

1191.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. Goidelic alt and allt.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 207–209.
1. all ‘rock, cliff’; 2. ail ‘rock’; 3. alt ‘joint, etc’; 4. allt ‘height, cliff’; 5. alt and allt contrasted. Also on the contrast between ‘lenited’ l and ‘unlenited’ ll before t in OIr. (vs. GOI, 74).

Allt Leacachain

13249.
Fraser (Ian A.): ‘The disembowelled horse’: a place-name tale from Gaelic oral tradition.
In ScS 37 (2014), pp. 83–85.
Refers to Allt Leacachain in Ross-shire.

Allt Loch Dhaile Beaga

5033.
Cox (Richard A. V.): Allt Loch Dhaile Beaga: place-name study in the west of Scotland.
In Nomina 14 (1990), pp. 83–96.

allt (ScG)

5033.
Cox (Richard A. V.): Allt Loch Dhaile Beaga: place-name study in the west of Scotland.
In Nomina 14 (1990), pp. 83–96.

Alltraige Caille

723.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Onomata.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 165–180.
1. Dar Óma (related to Ogmios); 2. Tairdelbach; 3. Ó Loith; 4. Uí Chobthaigh and their pedigrees; 5. Ua Carráin, Ó Corráin, (O) Curran(e); 6. Máel Dúin mac Áeda and Brega; 7. Dub Indrecht mac Cathassaich, King of Araid; 8. Corco Auluim (Úlum); 9. The supposed monastery of Alltraige Caille; 10. Cnámraige.

Almhain

18375.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth), Hennessy (Ronan): Finn’s Seat: topographies of power and royal marchlands of Gaelic polities in medieval Ireland.
In LH 38/2 (2017), pp. 29–62.
Investigates hilltop cairns and mounds named Suidhe Finn which were used as boundary landmarks. Includes a case study of the landscape of the hill of Almhain and its summit mound of Suidhe Finn in North Leinster.

Almu

13320.
Parsons (Geraldine): Revisiting Almu in Middle Irish texts.
In Authorities and adaptations (2014), pp. 211–231.
Discusses traditions surrounding the hill at Almu, particularly in fíannaigecht texts.
18375.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth), Hennessy (Ronan): Finn’s Seat: topographies of power and royal marchlands of Gaelic polities in medieval Ireland.
In LH 38/2 (2017), pp. 29–62.
Investigates hilltop cairns and mounds named Suidhe Finn which were used as boundary landmarks. Includes a case study of the landscape of the hill of Almhain and its summit mound of Suidhe Finn in North Leinster.

Alpe

3513.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [4.] Welsh elfydd, elfydden, Scottish Gaelic Alba.
In BBCS 36 (1989), pp. 109–110.

alt

1191.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: IV. Goidelic alt and allt.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 207–209.
1. all ‘rock, cliff’; 2. ail ‘rock’; 3. alt ‘joint, etc’; 4. allt ‘height, cliff’; 5. alt and allt contrasted. Also on the contrast between ‘lenited’ l and ‘unlenited’ ll before t in OIr. (vs. GOI, 74).
8006.
Mac Aongusa (Máire): Seachta frisa toimsiter Gaedhelg: seven things by which Gaedhelg is measured.
In SCF 5 (2008), pp. 54–63.
Discusses the terms fid, deach, réim, forbaid, alt, insce and etargaire as they appear in the Book of Ballymote version of Auraicept na n-éces.

am

12346.
Mag Eacháin (Conchúr): Varia: III. Tá sé an t-am...
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 259–266.
Examples, particularly from Ulster, of the Irish for ‘it is (high) time’.

-am

487.
Kelly (Fergus): A note on Old Irish círmaire.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 231–233.
Argues this form (< cír ‘comb’) contains two agentive suffixes (-am and -aire).

ám mbai > án am bai (recte)

443.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on two biblical glosses.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 108–109.
I. For ám mbai (MS án imbai; Ml. 29c15), read án am bai ‘their band which was’; II. On the 3. pl. acc. fou ‘with reference to them’ (lit. ‘under them’) in Ml. 42b7.

ám [t]hám

1499.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Techt tuidecht.
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), pp. 1–6.
On ‘rhyming jingles’, often consisting of nominalised imperatives, e.g. techt tuidecht, aig thaig, soí toí, áin tháin (ám [t]hám in LL 34840 corrupt); cf. sa(i)n cha(i)n, baí chaí, ócaib tócaib — all denoting `(quick) movement to and fro’. Some discussion of rhyming combinations of two words in ModIr.

amach ach

446.
Stockman (Gearóid): Má go, amach ach.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 130–131.
Má go, maga, maha go ‘if not, unless’. Confusion of prepositions ach and amach ó ‘except’ spread to conjunction ach go, hence amach ó go (= má go), from which Ros Guill preposition amach ach was extracted based on homophony of ach and ó in this dialect as /a/. Cf. B. Ó Buachalla, in Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 143-161.

amach ó go

446.
Stockman (Gearóid): Má go, amach ach.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 130–131.
Má go, maga, maha go ‘if not, unless’. Confusion of prepositions ach and amach ó ‘except’ spread to conjunction ach go, hence amach ó go (= má go), from which Ros Guill preposition amach ach was extracted based on homophony of ach and ó in this dialect as /a/. Cf. B. Ó Buachalla, in Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 143-161.

amach ó (prep.)

446.
Stockman (Gearóid): Má go, amach ach.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 130–131.
Má go, maga, maha go ‘if not, unless’. Confusion of prepositions ach and amach ó ‘except’ spread to conjunction ach go, hence amach ó go (= má go), from which Ros Guill preposition amach ach was extracted based on homophony of ach and ó in this dialect as /a/. Cf. B. Ó Buachalla, in Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 143-161.

amadán

4248.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 4. óinmhid, ónna, amaid, amadán again.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 191–192.
ad T. F. O’Rahilly, in Ériu 13 (1942), pp. 149-152.

amaid

4248.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 4. óinmhid, ónna, amaid, amadán again.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 191–192.
ad T. F. O’Rahilly, in Ériu 13 (1942), pp. 149-152.

Amalgaid mac Fiachrach

1924.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): Aided Nath Í and Uí Fhiachrach genealogies.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 1–27.
Examines the textual tradition of Aided Nath Í and refutes of the historicity of the Amalgaid mac Nath Í in the LU text.

Amalgaid mac Nath Í

1924.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): Aided Nath Í and Uí Fhiachrach genealogies.
In Éigse 25 (1991), pp. 1–27.
Examines the textual tradition of Aided Nath Í and refutes of the historicity of the Amalgaid mac Nath Í in the LU text.

amar (ScG)

7552.
Cheape (Hugh): Logboats in history: West Highland evidence.
In PSAS 129 (1999), pp. 851–860.
Includes discussion of the Gaelic terminology: coit, amar.

*amb (PrIr)

1224.
Schrijver (Peter): On the development of vowels before tautosyllabic nasals in Primitive Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33–52.
1. Introduction; 2. Rise of nasalized allophones of short vowels; 3. The development of *nt, *nk into PrimIr. unlenited *d, *g; 4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’; 5. Loss of a nasal before a voicless fricative; 6. OIr. téit, -tét; 7. The relation of *nt, *nk > *d, *g to the rounding of vowels by a preceding labiovelar; 8. Summary; App.: The development of PrimIr. *and, *amb, *ang.

am-bue

1132.
McCone (Kim): The inflection of OIr. ‘cow’ and the etymology of buchet.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 37–44.
vs.T. F. O’Rahilly, in Ériu 16 (1952), pp. 7-20. Derives buchet from *bu-kanto-s, inverted from *kanto-bu-s ‘possessing a hundred cows’. Derives bue ‘man of property’, am-bue ‘man without property’ from *bow- ‘cow’ (vs. LEIA B-112).

amein

13866.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: I. 2. Ané, aná and an example in Bardic syntactical tracts.
In Ériu 64 (2014), pp. 209–211.

-amh (ScG)

626.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): ‘Siubhadaibh a bhalachaibh! Tha an suirbhidh a-nis ullamh agaibh’: mar a dh’éirich do -bh, -mh gun chudrom ann an Gàidhlig Alba.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 61–74.
The development of unstressed -a(i)bh, -amh to -i and -u in ScG. Fuller version publ. in Scottish Gaelic Studies 21 (2003) 163-219.

amháin

1567.
Breatnach (R. A.): The formant -in.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 232–234.
On the adverbial suffix -in, e.g. feastain, chuigint, choíchin, thoirin, anallain, ScG mu dhéidhinn, amháin, etc.; suggests -in originated in éicin.

amhas (ScG)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

amhasag (ScG)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

amhasan (ScG)

767.
Lockwood (W. B.): Wortgeschichtliche Miszellen.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 154–167.
Discusses the bird-names: ScG gug ‘gannet or solan goose’; Ir. foracha ‘common guillemot’; Gael. gearr (as used in bird-names, different to gearr ‘short’); ScG gearra-glas ‘black guillemot’; ScG craigeach ‘id.'; ScG falcag bhìorach ‘common guillemot’; ScG crosan ‘common guillemot; puffin’; Gael. taboo-replacements of the common guillemot (ScG eun dubh an sgadain, ScG eun a’ chrùbain, Ir. éan áille); ScG gille bog, boganach (as used in bird-names); Ir. droimneach ‘great black-backed gull’; Mx. spyrryd ‘tern’; ScG capull coille ‘capercaillie or Western grouse’; MIr. cerc ‘hen’.

amhlaidh

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.
1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

amhrán

1158.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Processes in nasalization and related issues.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 109–132.
The association of nasality and certain voiceless sounds: 1. Rhinoglottophilia, 2. Glottorhinophilia; 3. The sporadic change mh > m and related changes: (i) mh > m; (ii) amhrán; (iii) ScG siobhag; (iv) bh > b.
1672.
Harrison (Alan): Snéadhbhairdne.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 181–196.
Identifies two different types of snéadhbhairdne in crosántacht texts of the ClModIr period. Argues that the amhrán metre of later crosántacht texts derives from the syllabic snéadhbhairdne of earlier ones. Provides a rearrangment in amhrán form of snéadhbhairdne of the crosántacht beg. Targaire dhearscnaí do rinneadh le Créafann (based on text in NDii 31–33) by Peadar Ó Doirnín.

amlabar

15855.
Ní Chrábhagáin (Ciara): Disease and illness in medieval Ireland: an anthropological examination of some hagiographical material.
In RíM 24 (2013), pp. 115–133.
Examines the usage of names of illnesses and diseases occurring in the text of Bethada náem nÉrenn: 1. amlabar, bacach, bodhar, clamhdall, lobhar; 2. aillse, fiolun fionn, easbadha, cuthach; scamach, lirach, moirtin marbh, bás obann, ifreann; esláinte theinntidhe, galar cos, demhan.

Amlaíb

13689.
Nikolaeva (Natalia A.): On the phonology of the OIr. names Amlaíb, Ímar, Tomrair.
In Language links (2001), pp. 116–118.

amlaid

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.

amles

16179.
Sweetser (Eve): Advantage and disadvantage: cognate formulas for a Welsh and Irish topos of otherworldly ambiguity.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 191–194.
Argues that the use of les and aimles in Tochmarc Étaíne (cf. LU 10822-3) possibly represents an inherited Common Celtic formula.

amm

17446.
Stifter (David): Varia: II. The origin of time.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 219–226.
Discusses the etymology of OIr. amm and aimser.

ammait

6352.
Jørgensen (Anders Richardt): Irish báeth, báes, bés, ammait and Breton boaz, amoed.
In KF 4 (2009), pp. 189–193.

ammys (Mx)

4282.
Breatnach (R. A.): The vagaries of Scottish Gaelic fathamas.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 93–97.
Elucidates the meaning of ScG fathamas, and argues it is identical with Ir. ómós, fómós and Mx. ammys.

amnair

10029.
McCone (Kim): OIr. aub “river’ and amnair “maternal uncle” .
In MSS 53 (1992), pp. 101–111.
3233.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The sister’s son in early Irish literature.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 128–160.
On the significance of the maternal kindred in early Irish literature, as exemplified by Christ’s relationship with the Jews, Bres’s with the Túatha Dé Danann and Cú Chulainn’s with Conchobar.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 65-94.

amné

1159.
Breatnach (Liam): On words ending in a stressed vowel in Early Irish.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 133–142.
Concludes that there are no grounds for postulating a category of words with final short stressed vowel in Old Irish. 1. ‘from her’; 2. ‘from him, it’; 3. (cechtar) ‘each of the two’; 4. imallé ‘together’; 5. illé ‘hither’; 6. ‘hot’; 7. ‘this’; 8. ‘this’; 9. amné ‘thus’; 10. danó ‘then’.
13866.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: I. 2. Ané, aná and an example in Bardic syntactical tracts.
In Ériu 64 (2014), pp. 209–211.

amour courtois

1703.
Ó Tuama (Seán): Traidisiúin iasachta sna dánta grá.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 301–318.
Amour courtois: [1.] A litir ghrá; [2.] Ainm na mná; [3.] An chanson dialoguée; [4.] Narcissus agus an macalla; [5.] An aisling ghrá; [6.] Dánta aoire agus magaidh; [7.] Iarfhocal.

amugha

4275.
Breatnach (R. A.): Varia: 2. mùthadh.
In SGS 14/2 (1986), pp. 143–145.

-án

601.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Forás na ndeirí díspeagtha -ean agus -ein i nGaeilge na hAlban.
In Béalra (2001), pp. 1–43.
Considers the development of diminutive suffixes -én, -ín, -án in Scottish Gaelic.

aN

1130.
Schrijver (Peter): The development of Primitive Irish *aN before voiced stop.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 13–25.
Explains the distribution of aN and iN before voiced stops in Irish.

an-

771.
Ahlqvist (Anders): On adverbs of place in Irish.
In ZCP 35 (1976), pp. 158–168.
Examines the Irish adverbs of place, with particular emphasis on the directional prefixes t-, s-, an-.
4304.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 7. an- ‘very’.
In SGS 16 (1990), p. 194.

án

2841.
Williams (J. E. Caerwyn): Welsh iawn.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 1000–1012.
Posits *yewes- (vel sim.) as etymon of W iawn (cf. L iūs), thus dissociating OIr. án from it.

an aire (ScG)

4285.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Scotticisms in a manuscript of 1467.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 122–139.
Discusses features found in MS NLS, Advocates’ 72.1.1: 1. Preterite passive form; 2. Present passive form; 3. dh’ before vowel sounds; 4. Imperfect/conditional second person singular; 5. Demonstrative relative; 6. Nasalization; 7. Is ann; 8. Plurals in -ann; 9. Caducous vowels; 10. Vowel-lengthening before long liquids; 11. Voicing of -p- in mp-group; 12. Aitte; 13. An aire; 14. Easbaig; 15. Eiphit; 16. Fèill; 17. Glais; 18. Seann-; 19. Teirig; 20. Toir; 21. Thusa.

án am bai (recte) < ám mbai

443.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes on two biblical glosses.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 108–109.
I. For ám mbai (MS án imbai; Ml. 29c15), read án am bai ‘their band which was’; II. On the 3. pl. acc. fou ‘with reference to them’ (lit. ‘under them’) in Ml. 42b7.

an (article)

2657.
de Bernardo Stempel (Patrizia): Indogermanische Demonstrativa und der altirische Artikel.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 259–271.
Traces the development of the Old Irish article from its origin in the Indo-European demonstrative stem *so/to- to its partial substitution by the root *sem- ‘one’.

An Charraic

2299.
Hughes (A. J.): On the Ulster place-names: Glynn, Glenavy, Carrickfergus and Forkill.
In Ainm 5 (1991), pp. 92–107.

An Chlosach

2346.
Ó Ceallaigh (Séamus): BUPNS reprints 11: An Chlosach.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 162–166.
Repr. from BUPNS 1/3 (Summer, 1953), pp. 49–53; (Addendum), BUPNS 1/4 (Autumn 1953) 78; [also repr. as BUPNS 1 (1955), pp. 33-36].

An druimfhionn dubh

1506.
Killeen (J. F.): An Irish song in Smollett?
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), p. 66.
Argues that Drimmendoo in Tobias Smollett’s The Expedition of Humphry Clinker (1771) represents the Irish song An druimfhionn dubh.

An Fheothanach

10632.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): An Fheothanach, Feohanagh.
In Peritia 11 (1997), p. 334.
Feohanagh, Co. Kerry.

An Mhaoil Rua

2243.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): ‘Maoil’ i logainmneacha: focal a chiallaíonn sruth?
In Ainm 1 (1986), pp. 3–13.
An Mhaoil ‘Moyle’, An Mhaoil Rua, Sruth na Maoile, Cúil Mhuine, Rinn Mhaoile, Oitir na Maoile, An Mhaoil ‘The Minch’, Mullach Íde, etc.

Addendum in Ainm 2 (1987), pp. 132-135.

An Mhaoil ‘Moyle’

2243.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): ‘Maoil’ i logainmneacha: focal a chiallaíonn sruth?
In Ainm 1 (1986), pp. 3–13.
An Mhaoil ‘Moyle’, An Mhaoil Rua, Sruth na Maoile, Cúil Mhuine, Rinn Mhaoile, Oitir na Maoile, An Mhaoil ‘The Minch’, Mullach Íde, etc.

Addendum in Ainm 2 (1987), pp. 132-135.

An Mhaoil ‘The Minch’

2243.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): ‘Maoil’ i logainmneacha: focal a chiallaíonn sruth?
In Ainm 1 (1986), pp. 3–13.
An Mhaoil ‘Moyle’, An Mhaoil Rua, Sruth na Maoile, Cúil Mhuine, Rinn Mhaoile, Oitir na Maoile, An Mhaoil ‘The Minch’, Mullach Íde, etc.

Addendum in Ainm 2 (1987), pp. 132-135.

An Mhuiríoch

10630.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Old Norse place names II: Muirbech, Smjǫrvík.
In Peritia 11 (1997), p. 187.
Smerwick, Murreagh, Co. Kerry.

-án- (preceding poss. adjs)

1060.
Mc Gonagle (Noel): Varia: IV. Réamhfhocail agus aidiachtaí sealbhacha a agus ár.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 199–202.
The insertion of -n- before 3 sg. / pl. and 1 pl. possessive adjectives, usually (though not always) following prepositions ending in a vowel. Compare similar insertion of -án- in Cois Fhairrge.

An Sailte Mór

2336.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Ainm Gaeilge ar an Great Saltee?
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 60–64.
Proposes Ir. Éininis.

-an (ScG, pl.)

1162.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Varia: II. A possible internal source for Scottish Gaelic plural -an.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 157–161.
Suggests ScG pl. -an may derive from pl. form -ána of diminutives, based on realisations with final 'geminate’ n.

An Spàin (ScG)

8721.
Cox (Richard A. V.): Scottish Gaelic Sannda and its aliases.
In JSNS 4 (2010), pp. 61–102.

an t- (for an before masc. nouns beg. with vowel when preceded by a preposition)

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

an ts- (nom. sg. masc.)

721.
Ó Siadhail (Mícheál): Roinnt athrúintí suntasacha i gcanúint Chonallach.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 142–147.
Based on the speech of one houselhold in Na Machaireacha, Gaoth Dobhair, Donegal: 1. -/xˊə/ in 3 sg. fem. and -/fə/ in 3 pl. forms of the compound preposition i ndéidh, e.g. ina déidh-che ‘after her’, ina ndéidh-fa ‘after them’; 2. é féin following 3 sg. masc. prepositional pronouns; 3. Generalisation of ina sheasamh, ina shuí, etc. with every person; 4. Variation in article between an and an t- with masc. nouns beg. with s- in the nom. sg. (e.g. an tsiopa) and also with masc. nouns beg. with a vowel in nom. sg. and when preceded by a preposition (e.g. an airgead, ar an t-éadan); 5. ag goil + vn + object pronoun; 6. The direct in place of the indirect relative particle; 7. más mómás fearr.

an (‘when’)

1300.
Ahlqvist (Anders): A line in Líadan and Cuirithir.
In Peritia 1 (1982), p. 334.
Third line of poem beg. Cen áinius should be read and translated as an ro ·carus ro ·cráidius ‘when I have loved, I have tormented’.

-ána

1162.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Varia: II. A possible internal source for Scottish Gaelic plural -an.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 157–161.
Suggests ScG pl. -an may derive from pl. form -ána of diminutives, based on realisations with final 'geminate’ n.

aná

13866.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: I. 2. Ané, aná and an example in Bardic syntactical tracts.
In Ériu 64 (2014), pp. 209–211.

anacal

9207.
Millward (Celia M.): Two Irish loans in English.
In AS 51/3-4 (Autumn/Winter 1976), pp. 281–282.
On the English idioms to cry uncle and to make a poor mouth, relating to Ir. anacal and béal bocht.

anae

14003.
Pyysalo (Jouna Olavi): Ten new etymologies between the Old Anatolian and the Celtic languages.
In SCF 11 (2014), pp. 48–66.
1. Hitt. ḫap- ‘reichlich vorhanden sein’: OIr. ana- ‘richness, property’; 2. Hitt. šinura- ‘mittellos, arm’: OIr. sēna- ‘nier, désavouer, rejeter’; 3. CLu. manai- `(beschreibt Vorratskörbe)': OIr. meinistir- (f.) ‘coffre contenant les ustensiles du culte’, 4. Hitt. mani- ‘Eiter’: OIr. mein·bligi- (pr.) ‘il foisonne, il fourmille’; 5. Hitt. maniti- ‘Wachstum (?)': OIr. muine ‘Berg’; 6. CLu. nani- ‘reinigen’: MIr. cruth·necht ‘roter Weizen’; 7. Hitt. ninga- ‘Regen’: OIr. nin- ‘cloud, wave’; 8. Hitt. KUŠšala- ‘Teil des Zaumzeugs’: OIr. selan- ‘corde, laisse de chien’; 9. Hitt. šant- ‘wertwolles Gegenstand’: OIr. sét- ‘trésor’; 10. Hitt. da- ‘all, ganz, gesamt’: OIr. ‘in full’.

-ánaic

2870.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On a possible Indo-Celtic etymological correspondence.
In ZCP 54 (2004), pp. 133–143.
Discusses the expression isara fie dúnn (Wb. 25c9), and argues it contains the 3rd sg. rel. of the future of ar-icc.
3045.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Notes de linguistique celtique: 1. Vieil-irlandais -ánaic “est allé''.
In ÉtC 23 (1986), p. 57.
On the origin of the deponent inflection found in the singular preterite.
6816.
Campanile (Enrico): Un relitto morfologico in irlandese antico.
In Studi Quattordio Moreschini (1998), pp. 141–144.
luid, -buich, do·cer, , -fuair, -ánaic.

Reprinted in Saggi Campanile, pp. 300-303.

-ánaicc

2810.
Ködderitzsch (Rolf): Indo-iranisch-keltische Übereinstimmungen.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 382–395.
Discusses seven morphological and syntactical features already touched upon by W. Meid (cf. BILL 470, pp. 45-56). With regard to Old Irish, these are: 1. the gaisced type of neuter singular dvandva; 2. the morphology of rígain; 3. the ending *-s of the genitive singular of the neuter n-stems; 4. the feminine forms of the numerals ‘3’ and ‘4’; 5. the reduplicated s-future; 6. the perfect formation -ánaicc; 7. the elliptic construction conráncatar ocus Dubthach.

anaimm

4770.
Remmer (Ulla): Das indogermanische Suffix -mon- im Altirischen (1. Teil).
In Sprache 43/2 (2002–2003), pp. 171–211.
Collects and analyses instances of agent nouns in -em: Prototypen bzw. frühere Bildungen (ainim(m)/anaim(m), talam); Bekannte und gesicherte -amon und -(i)i̯amon-Bildungen (airem, betham, brithem, cairem, dáilem, dúilem, féchem, fethem, flaithem, glaídem, legam, luam, medam, mraithem, orb(b)am, súainem).

Continued in Die Sprache 44 (2004), 26-69.

anair

3215.
Hamp (Eric P.): Nodiadau amrywiol: [4.] Welsh anant, OIr. anair.
In BBCS 26/2 (May 1975), p. 139.
ad LEIA A-73.

anallain

1567.
Breatnach (R. A.): The formant -in.
In Éigse 16/3 (Samhradh 1976), pp. 232–234.
On the adverbial suffix -in, e.g. feastain, chuigint, choíchin, thoirin, anallain, ScG mu dhéidhinn, amháin, etc.; suggests -in originated in éicin.

anart

10995.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Glossary entries on anart ‘a shroud’, the drink of death and the conjunction dath ‘because’.
In SGS 24 (2008), pp. 39–51.
On the anart entries in Sanas Cormaic (Corm. Y §37) and Dúil Dromma Cetta (CIH ii 605.15), focusing on the meaning of the citation dath don dich irt, which is interpreted as ‘because death comes’. In Appendix discusses two further instances of conjunction dath ‘because’ from Dúil Dromma Cetta.

anbal

3336.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 11. anbal.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 282–283.
On the variation anbal/ainfial and stem-initial f- after the privative particle an-.

anchara

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

and

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.
865.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 3. The transparency of *Heen(+ i).
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 180–181.
*Heen ‘therein, thereat’: iN ‘in which’ without surface relative, and its relation to anticipatory use of and / ann in sentences beginning is and / ann.
3718.
Ahlqvist (Anders): On preposed adverbials.
In SGS 13/1 (Autumn 1978), pp. 66–80.
Discusses the syntax of fronted adverbials in Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx.

and- (intensive)

3468.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 2. *Haéndhi and *Hambhí.
In Ériu 28 (1977), p. 145.
ad E. P. Hamp, in Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163-167 [Varia I: 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs]. Argues that OIr. and- and imb- are respectively the old locative and instrumental of a PIE root noun *Haen- ‘top’.

*and (PrIr)

1224.
Schrijver (Peter): On the development of vowels before tautosyllabic nasals in Primitive Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33–52.
1. Introduction; 2. Rise of nasalized allophones of short vowels; 3. The development of *nt, *nk into PrimIr. unlenited *d, *g; 4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’; 5. Loss of a nasal before a voicless fricative; 6. OIr. téit, -tét; 7. The relation of *nt, *nk > *d, *g to the rounding of vowels by a preceding labiovelar; 8. Summary; App.: The development of PrimIr. *and, *amb, *ang.

andee

2748.
Rankin (David): Bendacht dee agus andee fort, a ingen (Táin bó Cúalgne 2111, O’Rahilly).
In ZCP 51 (1999), pp. 116–129.
Discusses in particular the term andee, arguing that it denotes not humans but supernatural beings.

andóit

4453.
MacDonald (Aidan): Annat in Scotland: a provisional review.
In ScS 17 (1973), pp. 135–146.
Argues that the element annaid (< OIr. andóit) in Scottish place names was in the broadened meaning of `(site of an) old church’. Includes a list of occurrences of Annat.
6675.
Clancy (Thomas Owen): Annat in Scotland and the origins of the parish.
In IR 46/2 (Autumn 1995), pp. 91–115.
OIr. andóit.
8319.
Coates (Richard): The name of the island of Annet, Isles of Scilly, Cornwall.
In Ainm 9 (2008), pp. 73–84.
Suggests it derives from OIr. andóit.

ané

13866.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: I. 2. Ané, aná and an example in Bardic syntactical tracts.
In Ériu 64 (2014), pp. 209–211.

Anesus

2264.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): Some bogus Irish saints.
In Ainm 3 (1988), pp. 1–8.
Anesus (Nesus), Bríg, Ciar, Conchliath, Damán, Feilic, Feimme, Medrán, Meic Mochoba, Modiúit (Modút), Ródán, Sénán, Sillán, T’eolas.

anfed

1127.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: V. 2. The flexion of ainb ‘ignorant’.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 140–141.
Gen. sg. and pl. anfed.

*ang (PrIr)

1224.
Schrijver (Peter): On the development of vowels before tautosyllabic nasals in Primitive Irish.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 33–52.
1. Introduction; 2. Rise of nasalized allophones of short vowels; 3. The development of *nt, *nk into PrimIr. unlenited *d, *g; 4. OIr. -icc ‘comes, reaches’; 5. Loss of a nasal before a voicless fricative; 6. OIr. téit, -tét; 7. The relation of *nt, *nk > *d, *g to the rounding of vowels by a preceding labiovelar; 8. Summary; App.: The development of PrimIr. *and, *amb, *ang.

angailt

12344.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Dornán iasachtaí sa Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 246–251.
1. giústa / giúsda / giusda; 2. bolb; 3. corsaicí / cursaicí / cosaicí / cosáicí; 4. (sna) luchógaí; 5. agaill / agailt / agaille / angailt / anglach; 6. pailis / pailís / pálás.

anglach

12344.
Nic Mhaoláin (Máire): Varia: I. Dornán iasachtaí sa Ghaeilge.
In Éigse 38 (2013), pp. 246–251.
1. giústa / giúsda / giusda; 2. bolb; 3. corsaicí / cursaicí / cosaicí / cosáicí; 4. (sna) luchógaí; 5. agaill / agailt / agaille / angailt / anglach; 6. pailis / pailís / pálás.

Anglo-Saxons

1615.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): Gildas and the Anglo-Saxons.
In CMCS 6 (Winter 1983), pp. 1–30.
Includes mention of Irish influences upon and references to De excidio Britanniae.

anim

1194.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: V. 2. anim, on ‘blemish’.
In Ériu 43 (1992), p. 211.

anmaibh

2685.
McManus (Damian): Varia: III. Miscellanea on bardic poetry: 5. Forms of the word ainm.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 159–160.
Dat. pl. anmaibh.

anmaimm

3188.
Byrd (Andrew Miles): Return to dative anmaimm.
In Ériu 56 (2006), pp. 145–155.
Discusses the origin of the ending -(a)im(m) of the dative singular of Old Irish neuter n-stems, providing substantiation for C. Marstrander's suggestion (in Ériu 5 (1911), p. 200) of an assimilation of *-mmVn# to *-mmVm#.

anmchara

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

ann

3750.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid.
In Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188–191.
Traces the West Munster Irish (and Scottish Gaelic) emphasizing use of is ann…‘in (actual) fact’ (= is amhlaidh…) back to Middle Irish.
865.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: VII. 3. The transparency of *Heen(+ i).
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 180–181.
*Heen ‘therein, thereat’: iN ‘in which’ without surface relative, and its relation to anticipatory use of and / ann in sentences beginning is and / ann.
3718.
Ahlqvist (Anders): On preposed adverbials.
In SGS 13/1 (Autumn 1978), pp. 66–80.
Discusses the syntax of fronted adverbials in Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx.

ann coitcheann

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

-ann (gen. pl.)

1079.
McGonagle (Noel): Varia: V. A genitive plural termination.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 187–189.
On the gen. pl. terminations -ann and -ach in dialects of Ulster and north Connacht.

ann (ScG)

3718.
Ahlqvist (Anders): On preposed adverbials.
In SGS 13/1 (Autumn 1978), pp. 66–80.
Discusses the syntax of fronted adverbials in Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx.
3603.
Cram (David): Scottish Gaelic ann as an aspect particle.
In StC 18–19 (1983–1984), pp. 311–326.
13555.
Schreiner (Sylvia L. R.): The creation and interpretation of nominal predicates: bi + ann in Scottish Gaelic.
In Lingua 154 (Jan. 2015), pp. 110–139.
11212.
Adger (David): Clefted situations: a note on expletives in Scottish Gaelic clefts.
In Formal approaches to Celtic linguistics (2011), pp. 3–15.

annaid

6675.
Clancy (Thomas Owen): Annat in Scotland and the origins of the parish.
In IR 46/2 (Autumn 1995), pp. 91–115.
OIr. andóit.

annaid (ScG)

4453.
MacDonald (Aidan): Annat in Scotland: a provisional review.
In ScS 17 (1973), pp. 135–146.
Argues that the element annaid (< OIr. andóit) in Scottish place names was in the broadened meaning of `(site of an) old church’. Includes a list of occurrences of Annat.

annamh

10130.
Acquaviva (Paolo): Negation in Irish and the representation of monotone decreasing quantifiers.
In Syntax of the Celtic languages (1996), pp. 284–313.

annasach (ScG)

4345.
Ní Suaird (Damhnait): Jacobite rhetoric and terminology in the political poems of the Fernaig MS (1688–1693).
In SGS 19 (1999), pp. 93–140.
Focuses on the terms: dual, dualchas; dleasdanach; dligheach; dìlseachd, dìleas; còir; àite, ionad; oighre/éighre, oighreachd/éighreachd; staoighle; Breatunn; ceart, ceartas; fìreantachd; ceann, ceannas; eucoir, eucoireach, eucorach; annasach.

Annat

4453.
MacDonald (Aidan): Annat in Scotland: a provisional review.
In ScS 17 (1973), pp. 135–146.
Argues that the element annaid (< OIr. andóit) in Scottish place names was in the broadened meaning of `(site of an) old church’. Includes a list of occurrences of Annat.

annóit

4453.
MacDonald (Aidan): Annat in Scotland: a provisional review.
In ScS 17 (1973), pp. 135–146.
Argues that the element annaid (< OIr. andóit) in Scottish place names was in the broadened meaning of `(site of an) old church’. Includes a list of occurrences of Annat.

annsa

1181.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Discourse markers in medieval Irish texts: cs̄, cair, nı̄, and similar features.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 1–37.
1. Functional identity of cs̄, ces, cesc, and cair; 2. Origin of cair and ces; 3. ce(a)sc; 4. ní insae, ní ansae, ní hannsa; n’insae; 5. Translation, lento style, stylistic variation; 6. ce(a)st, ceist; 7. Conclusions. Incl. index of texts referred to.

annsae

3334.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 9. asse.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 281–282.
asse < *ad-sād-s-io- (*sād- = W hawdd); anse < *n̥-sād-s-io-.

Annwfyn (MW)

1757.
Carey (John): The location of the Otherworld in the Irish tradition.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 36–43.
Argues that the idea of the overseas Otherworld is not natural to the Irish tradition.

Republ. in The Otherworld voyage in early Irish literature, pp. 113-119.

ánruth

5832.
Ó hAodha (Donncha): An bhairdne i dtús a ré.
In LCC 24 (1994), pp. 9–20.
Discusses the metrical tract entitled Córus bard cona bairdne (Mittelirische Verslehren I, ed. by R. Thurneysen 1891 [Best1, p. 53]). Includes a list of the metres associated with every grade.

ans (Ul)

1858.
Watson (Seosamh): Foirmeacha athdúbailte copaile i gcanúintí Dhún na nGall.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 194–199.

ansae

1181.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Discourse markers in medieval Irish texts: cs̄, cair, nı̄, and similar features.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 1–37.
1. Functional identity of cs̄, ces, cesc, and cair; 2. Origin of cair and ces; 3. ce(a)sc; 4. ní insae, ní ansae, ní hannsa; n’insae; 5. Translation, lento style, stylistic variation; 6. ce(a)st, ceist; 7. Conclusions. Incl. index of texts referred to.

ans(a)e

3334.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 9. asse.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 281–282.
asse < *ad-sād-s-io- (*sād- = W hawdd); anse < *n̥-sād-s-io-.

ante tertiam (Lat.)

1083.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): Welsh anterth, Old Irish anteirt.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 1–11.
< Lat. ante tertiam.

anteirt

1083.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): Welsh anterth, Old Irish anteirt.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 1–11.
< Lat. ante tertiam.

anterth (W)

1083.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): Welsh anterth, Old Irish anteirt.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 1–11.
< Lat. ante tertiam.

Antrobus (Cheshire)

8912.
Breeze (Andrew): The Norse-Irish and Antrobus, Cheshire.
In NHi 46/1 (Mar. 2009), pp. 141–142.
< OIr. an trebthas.

Anu/Anann

1776.
Carey (John): Notes on the Irish war-goddess.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 263–275.
Account of the three Machas: Macha the wife of Nemed mac Agnomain, Macha Mongruad and Macha the wife of Cruinn mac Agnomain.

*ao < *apo

3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

áo (áu)

630.
Uhlich (Jürgen): On the fate of intervocalic *-- in Old Irish, especially between neutral vowels.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 11–48.
Includes discussion of hypercorrect spellings of au for u, which gave rise to áu for ú; unexpected áu (áo) supported by rhyme; some cases of unjustified spellings óu (ou).

aodan (ScG)

3161.
Hughes (Art J.): Un cas d’homonymie: les termes pour “visage” e pour “foie” dans les langues gaéliques.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 217–232.
aghaidh, éadan, aodan.

Aodh Eanghach

2168.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): Aodh Eanghach and the Irish king-hero.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [Fs. Carney] (1989), pp. 200–232.
Examines the bardic poetry motif of the prophesied redeemer king, exemplified by Aodh Eanghach.

Aodh Ruadh Ó Domhnaill (†1602)

1249.
Breatnach (Pádraig A.): A seventeenth-century abridgement of Beatha Aodha Ruaidh Uí Dhomhnaill.
In Éigse 33 (2002), pp. 77–172.
Ed. from MS NLI G 488, with introduction, English translation and notes.

áoi trasgartha (or trasgairthe)

17996.
Hoyne (Mícheál): Early Modern Irish miscellanea: 3. Áoi trasgartha.
In Ériu 67 (2017), pp. 178–183.
On the distinction of words earlier written with ai (which later became oi but did not retain a variant in ai) and also with (later written áoi), responsible for various metrical licences.

Aoibheall mhaol

1442.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): The ingen moel.
In Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 217–227.
Perhaps originally meant ‘servant girl’; cf. Mx inney / inneen-veyl ‘hand-maid, maid-servant’. Also on the use of maol, esp. with women’s names, e.g. Aoibheall mhaol and Gráinne Mhaol in ModIr verse.

aoighe

1951.
Breatnach (R. A.): Focal ar fiarlóid.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 113–117.
aghaidh and oidhe(adh) meaning ‘deserts’ in idiomatic expressions should be written an fhoighe since < OIr. foigde ‘begging’.

Followed by an Addendum to Éigse 7 (1953-55), pp. 265-6.

Aoincheannach

1648.
Meek (Donald E.): The banners of the Fian in Gaelic ballad tradition.
In CMCS 11 (Summer 1986), pp. 29–69.
[1.] Analogues of the banners in Germanic and other cultures; [2.] Banners in Irish tradition outside the fian; [3.] Banners associated with the fian; [4.] The banner quatrains in later tradition (incl. names of banners, e.g. Dealbh Ghréine, Fulang Doghra, Aoincheannach, Dún Naomhtha, Lámh Dhearg, Sguab Ghábhaidh, Lóch Luinneach); [5.] Form and composition of the BDL poem [see [6.]]; [6.] Edition (Poem beg. Naoinear a chuadhm[ar] fá choill, ed. from NLS MS Adv. 72.1.37 (Dean of Lismore’s Bk); with Engl transl. and notes). Figs.

aol(bh)ach

870.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: I. 2. gallúnach, gallaoireach.
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 186–187.
gallúnach < gall- (‘foreign’) + uan(bh)ach (‘foam’) (vs. C. D. Buck, A dictionary of selected synonyms in the principal Indo-European languages (1949), 453 (BILL 1575); gallaoireach < gallaoileach < gall- + aol(bh)ach (‘lime-like’).
Buck (C. D.) (ref.)

aon dath

1673.
Ó Dochartaigh (Cathair): Donegal a dhath ar bith.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 197–202.
Discusses different responses in LASID for the word ‘anything’ in Ulster dialects and their distribution, e.g. a dhath, aon dath, dadaidh, dadamh, rud ar bith, etc. Outlines how a dhath ar bith may have been introduced into Omeath Irish from North-West Donegal.

aonach (ScG)

4519.
Black (Ronald I. M.): Scottish fairs and fair-names.
In ScS 33 (1999), pp. 1–75.
Presents and discusses a corpus of fair-names, including a section on fair-name typology.

aon-tlachd (ScG)

4457.
Cannon (Roderick D.): Gaelic names of pibrochs: a classification.
In ScS 34 (2000–2006), pp. 20–59.

aotrom (ScG)

18300.
Dereza (Oksana): Physical qualities in Goidelic: a corpus study of polysemy and collocability.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 8 (2018), pp. 71–88.
Offers a case-study of adjectives denoting heaviness and lightness in Irish and Scottish Gaelic: trom, éadrom, etc.

ap

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

apartu

8309.
Hamp (Eric P.): Religon and law from Iguvium.
In JIES 1/3 (Fall 1973), pp. 318–323.
Umbrian ařfertur is compared to OIr. ad·opair.

apgitir

2434.
Márkus (Gilbert): What were Patrick’s alphabets?
In CMCS 31 (Summer 1996), pp. 1–15.
Argues that the abgitorias and elementa that St. Patrick is said by Tírechán to have written are best taken as meaning ‘guides to monastic life’, comparable to OIr. aibgitir in Apgitir Chrábaid.

*apo > * ao

3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

apocope

1413.
Garrett (Andrew): On the prosodic phonology of Ogam Irish.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 139–160.
Three stages in PrimIr. apocope: 1. apocope affects word-final short front vowels (final *-n lost before *-h); 2. apocope occurs at end of phonological phrases; 3. generalisation of phrase-final apocope. Some discussion of initial mutations.

Appyn

5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.

ar-

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

ar a’n iúl

2050.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Two notes.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 285–288.
I. Vowel changes in the inflexion of cos, cas; II. The phrases *cuirim in iúl and *ar aoiniúl.

ar aenseol

2050.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Two notes.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 285–288.
I. Vowel changes in the inflexion of cos, cas; II. The phrases *cuirim in iúl and *ar aoiniúl.

ar aghaidh

1711.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ní íosfainn seachtain é.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 371–378.
[1.] On the use of indefinite nouns with time reference as adverbs meaning ‘over a period of …', e.g. seachtain, , bliain, , coicís in negative contexts in the Irish of An Cheathrú Rua; [2.] i leith an bóthar: on the adverbial use of the nominative of definite nouns following certain compound and nominal prepositions preceded by verbs of motion, e.g. ar aghaidh, i ngiorracht, i leith, timpeall, treasna; [3.] Tá sé ag dul Gaillimh: on the ‘elision’ of the preposition go before place-names.

ar aoiniúl

2050.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Two notes.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 285–288.
I. Vowel changes in the inflexion of cos, cas; II. The phrases *cuirim in iúl and *ar aoiniúl.

ar bith

3710.
McCaughey (Terence P.): Scottish Gaelic sam bith.
In SGS 12/1 (Sep. 1971), pp. 30–33.
On the unexpected eclipsis seen in this form.

ar chenn

3463.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. Syntactic comparisons: (c) Welsh erbyn.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 169–170.
is compared to Ir. ar chiunn, ar chenn.

ar chiunn

3463.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. Syntactic comparisons: (c) Welsh erbyn.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 169–170.
is compared to Ir. ar chiunn, ar chenn.

ar chos ar bith

238.
Watson (Seosamh): A note on some adverbial forms in Co. Donegal Irish.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 408–412.
1. Inishowen ar chos ar bith ‘at all’; 2. Inishowen, Glencolmcille ar shúl ‘away, gone’.

ar éigin

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.

-ar (in place names)

2249.
Ó Máille (T. S.): Place-name elements in -ar.
In Ainm 2 (1987), pp. 27–36.

ar ma(i)rb

1068.
Baumgarten (Rolf): The syntax of Irish: ar marb, ar mbeo : ar mairb, ar mbí.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 99–112.

ar mbeo / mbí

1068.
Baumgarten (Rolf): The syntax of Irish: ar marb, ar mbeo : ar mairb, ar mbí.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 99–112.

ar oein sheol

2050.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Two notes.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 285–288.
I. Vowel changes in the inflexion of cos, cas; II. The phrases *cuirim in iúl and *ar aoiniúl.

ár (poss. adj.)

1060.
Mc Gonagle (Noel): Varia: IV. Réamhfhocail agus aidiachtaí sealbhacha a agus ár.
In Ériu 39 (1988), pp. 199–202.
The insertion of -n- before 3 sg. / pl. and 1 pl. possessive adjectives, usually (though not always) following prepositions ending in a vowel. Compare similar insertion of -án- in Cois Fhairrge.

ar shúl

238.
Watson (Seosamh): A note on some adverbial forms in Co. Donegal Irish.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 408–412.
1. Inishowen ar chos ar bith ‘at all’; 2. Inishowen, Glencolmcille ar shúl ‘away, gone’.

ar thús cadhnaíocht

1699.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Ar thús cadhnaíocht.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), p. 266.
cadhnaíocht < codhnach ‘leader’.

ar tinchur

10815.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Ailill and Medb: a marriage of equals.
In Ulidia 2 (2009), pp. 46–53.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 249-258.

Discusses the introductory ‘pillow-talk’ episode in Táin bó Cúailnge rec. II. In Appendix: Addendum on ar/for tinchur.

Ara

13354.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Arran place-names: a fresh look.
In Northern studies 28 (1991), pp. 1–13.

Ára airthir

1953.
Ó Murchú (Séamas): An tainm áite Inis Oírr.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 119–123.
Inis Oírr < Inis Oirthir, with detailed linguistic discussion.

Incl. 3 apps: A. On the Co. Clare version of the name; B. On the doubtful identification of Magh Saíre (in Lebor na Cert) with Inis Oírr; C. The oldest English names.

Arabic

1616.
Burnett (Charles S. F.): Arabic divinatory texts and Celtic folklore: a comment on the theory and practice of scapulimancy in Western Europe.
In CMCS 6 (Winter 1983), pp. 31–42.
The practice of divination from sheep’s shoulder blades (ScG slinneannachd) is traced from seventeenth century Gaelic folk-culture back to medieval Arabic treatises composed in Spain. Incl. plts.

ara-chrin

3146.
Tremblay (Xavier): Études sur le verbe vieil-irlandais: 1. La classe B V de Thurneysen; 2. ro-laë et les parfaits de bases ultimae laryngalis.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 151–165.
1. ara·chrin, at·baill, do·lin, at·gnin, etc. 2. -cuirethar.
475.
Campanile (Enrico): A note on the classification of some Old Irish verbs.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 99–103.
1. do-lin (pl. du-linat) ‘flows’; 2. ara-chrin ‘decays, fails’; 3. ro-cluinethar ‘hears’; 4. at-baill ‘dies’; 5. marnid ‘betrays’; 6. ro-finnadar ‘gets to know’; 7. -gnin ‘knows’.
3144.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Préverbes gaulois suffixes en -io-: ambio, ario-, cantio-.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 115–121.
Examines the Continental Celtic background of nouns derived from prepositions (in particular ar, imm, cét-); also discusses Old Irish compound verbs with petrified neuter infix pronoung (ara-chrin, imme-airic, ceta-bí).
3635.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Studies in Celtic and Indo-European verbal morphology: 1. The Old Irish present type arachrinim.
In StC 26–27 (1991–1992), pp. 1–2.

arae

2698.
Campanile (Enrico): Zur Etymologie von altir. arae und eirr.
In ZCP 43 (1989), pp. 174–178.
arae < are-sed-s ‘who stays’ (cf. ar-said, ar-sissedar); eirr < *en-ret-s ‘who runs against’ (cf. ind-reith).

Reprinted in Saggi Campanile, pp. 267-269.
8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

arafie

2870.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On a possible Indo-Celtic etymological correspondence.
In ZCP 54 (2004), pp. 133–143.
Discusses the expression isara fie dúnn (Wb. 25c9), and argues it contains the 3rd sg. rel. of the future of ar-icc.

Araid

4906.
Mahon (William): Glasraige, Tóecraige, and Araid: evidence from Ogam.
In PHCC 8 (1990), pp. 11–30.
Identifies some of the names in the Dunloe Ogam inscriptions.

Araid (King of)

723.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Onomata.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 165–180.
1. Dar Óma (related to Ogmios); 2. Tairdelbach; 3. Ó Loith; 4. Uí Chobthaigh and their pedigrees; 5. Ua Carráin, Ó Corráin, (O) Curran(e); 6. Máel Dúin mac Áeda and Brega; 7. Dub Indrecht mac Cathassaich, King of Araid; 8. Corco Auluim (Úlum); 9. The supposed monastery of Alltraige Caille; 10. Cnámraige.

Arainn

13354.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Arran place-names: a fresh look.
In Northern studies 28 (1991), pp. 1–13.
4435.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland including Arran, Carmunnock, Gogar and Water of May.
In ScotL 19 (2000), pp. 117–134.
1. The isle of Arran; 2. Carmyle, Glasgow; 3. Carmunnock, near Glasgow; 4. The river Gryfe, near Paisley; 5. Watcarrick, near Lockerbie; 6. ‘Crachoctre’, near Coldingham; 7. Gogar, near Edinburgh; 8. Two Angus place-names: Prosen Water and Aberlemno; 9. Arbirlot, near Arbroath; 10. The Water of May, near Perth.

arasc

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

arbar

3143.
Hamp (Eric P.): Old Irish arbar n. ‘corn’.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 89–90.

Arbirlot

4435.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland including Arran, Carmunnock, Gogar and Water of May.
In ScotL 19 (2000), pp. 117–134.
1. The isle of Arran; 2. Carmyle, Glasgow; 3. Carmunnock, near Glasgow; 4. The river Gryfe, near Paisley; 5. Watcarrick, near Lockerbie; 6. ‘Crachoctre’, near Coldingham; 7. Gogar, near Edinburgh; 8. Two Angus place-names: Prosen Water and Aberlemno; 9. Arbirlot, near Arbroath; 10. The Water of May, near Perth.

Archaic Irish

1447.
Breatnach (Liam): Canon law and secular law in early Ireland: the significance of Bretha nemed.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 439–459.
Discusses Bretha nemed, dated to between 721 and 742, composed in Munster by three kinsmen: Forannán (a bishop), Máel Tuile (a poet) and Báethgalach hua Búirecháin (a judge). Incl. ed. with transl. of six verses of a poem beg. Aimirgin Glungeal tuir teand by Gilla in Choimded Ua Cormaic from RIA MS D ii 1 (Bk of Uí Mhaine). Old Irish version of Collectio Canonum Hibernensis Book XLII, chaps 1-4, ed. with translation and notes from Cotton Nero A 7. Some discussion of rosc and ‘Archaic Irish’.
1718.
Carney (James): Aspects of Archaic Irish.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), pp. 417–435.
Statutory public lecture of the School of Celtic Studies, 1978. On syncope and the ‘trisyllabic factor’ in Archaic Irish verse; includes a discussion of Bergin’s law.

archiunn (‘ahead, further on’)

406.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Notes on Saint Gall glosses.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 77–86.
Based on an examination of the text of Priscian’s Institutiones Grammaticae in Sankt Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, MS 904: 1. Corrections and additions to the text of the Old Irish glosses; 2. Some proposals about the translation or the interpretation of the St. Gall glosses; 3. An additional note on OIr. archiunn ‘a-head, further on’.

ard

5106.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Old Irish heights and word-field potential.
In StH 24 (1984–1988), pp. 29–50.
OIr. ard, ardae, dígas, dígsa, mullach, slíab, tulach.

Árd Ciannachta

13034.
Byrnes (Michael): The Árd Ciannachta in Adomnán’s Vita Columbae: a reflection of Iona’s attitude to the Síl nÁeda Slaine in the late seventh century.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 127–136.
Comments on the inclusion of the anecdote on the Árd Ciannachta in Vita Columbae II.4, suggesting it is motivated by Adomnán’s disapproval of Síl nÁeda Sláine expansion at the expense of Ciannachta territory in Brega.

Ard (IOM)

2122.
Broderick (George): Sprachkontakt und Sprachgeschichte der Insel Man im Rahmen ihrer Ortsnamen.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 57–65.

Ard Macha

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.
7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.
8920.
Ó Mainnín (Mícheál B.): `Saig in Machai fothúaid': on the application and extent of ‘the Macha' in north-west Armagh.
In Ériu 60 (2010), pp. 111–130.
9315.
Ó Mainnín (Mícheál B.): Narrative construction and toponymic exploitation: Ard Macha and related names in medieval Irish texts.
In Aiste 3 (2010), pp. 1–18.
11541.
Dumville (David N.): Emain Macha, Ard Macha.
In Saint Patrick 493-1993 (1993), pp. 147–152.

Ard Macha Bréige

2347.
Ó Ceallaigh (Séamus): BUPNS reprints 12: Queries and suggestions.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 167–168.
1. Ard Macha Bréige; 2. Kilcorway; 3. MacArt’s Fort: Ballymacarret.

Repr. from BUPNS 1/3 (Summer, 1953), pp. 54-56; [also repr. as BUPNS 1 (1955), pp. 36-37].

Ard na Caithne

10630.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Old Norse place names II: Muirbech, Smjǫrvík.
In Peritia 11 (1997), p. 187.
Smerwick, Murreagh, Co. Kerry.

Ard Relic

7391.
Hickey (Elizabeth): Notes on the topography of early monastic Clonard.
In SAM 16/2 (1995), pp. 33–38.
Ard Relic; Less in Memra.

Ard Sailech

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

Ardach

18443.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): An logainm ‘Ardach’.
In Ainm 14 (2018), pp. 69–77.

Ardachadh

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

ardae

5106.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Old Irish heights and word-field potential.
In StH 24 (1984–1988), pp. 29–50.
OIr. ard, ardae, dígas, dígsa, mullach, slíab, tulach.

ardchless co n-ublaib

9598.
Sayers (William): Games, sport and para-military exercise in early Ireland.
In Aethlon 10/1 (Fall 1992), pp. 105–123.
Reviews D. Binchy's discussion (in Celtica 8.144) of the terms for games and sports named in Mellbretha: 1. lúb, líathróit; 2. corthe críche; 3. tochailt trebán; 4. lém; 5. snám; 6. sraenán; 7. brandub; 8. fidchell; 9. buanfach; 10. folach migán; 11. immarchor uanán; 12. ardchless co n-ublaib; 13. bocluasc; 14. echréim; 15. cor cloiche; 16. dréim; 17. léim; 18. díbirciud; 19. uathad fri hilar; 20. crosdibirciud; 21. táithe tuilche; 22. bundsach i n-airecht.

Appendix: A synthetic version of the lists of martial feats (cles) as found in the Ulster cycle of tales.

Arddae Huimnonn

5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.

Ardee

10826.
Ó Flaithearta (Mícheál): The etymologies of (Fer) Diad.
In Ulidia 2 (2009), pp. 218–225.
Suggests diad in personal name (Fer) Diad derives from gen. *dwi-pod-os of PIE *dwi-pod-s ‘two-footed’.

Arden

4553.
Sterckx (Claude): Diane Arduenna: la divine Ardenne.
In Ollodagos 8/1 (1995), pp. 49–83.

ardmaer

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

ardollam

14112.
Pettiau (Hérold): The officials of the church of Armagh in the early and central middle ages, to A.D. 1200.
In Armagh history and society (2001), pp. 121–186.
Lists and discusses the titles of officials of the church of Armagh found in early Irish chronicles: 1. epscop; 2. tánaise epscoip; 3. ap; 4. tánaise abbad: 5. secnap; 6. comarba; 7. airchinnech; 8. fosairchinnech; 9. maer (or ardmaer); 10. maer bachla Ísa; 11. ferthigis; 12. scríbneoir; 13. anchara; 14. fer léiginn; 15. toísech macc léiginn; 16. sacart; 17. anmchara; 18. senchaid; 19. ecnaid; 20. suí; 21. ardollam; 22. cenn bocht; 23. príomhchalladóir; 24. príomhchríochaire; 25. leabhar coimhéadaigh.

ardrach (gen. sg.)

1030.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: VI. 3. ardri as an old compound.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 192–193.
ardri and gen. sg. ardrech, ardrach attested in Old Irish sources, incl. Cáin Ḟuithirbe. Brief discussion of tríath as being of higher status than a king.

ardrech (gen. sg.)

1030.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: VI. 3. ardri as an old compound.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 192–193.
ardri and gen. sg. ardrech, ardrach attested in Old Irish sources, incl. Cáin Ḟuithirbe. Brief discussion of tríath as being of higher status than a king.

ardri

1030.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: VI. 3. ardri as an old compound.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 192–193.
ardri and gen. sg. ardrech, ardrach attested in Old Irish sources, incl. Cáin Ḟuithirbe. Brief discussion of tríath as being of higher status than a king.

Ardroil

2997.
Oftedal (Magne): “Ardroil” .
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 111–125.
Criticises and corrects W. J. Watson and G. Henderson’s methodology for reconstructing underlying Old Norse place-names in (especially Outer Hebrides) Scottish Gaelic.

Ards

5414.
Broderick (George): Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man.
In 4. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2007), pp. 67–81.
I. Pre-Scandinavian place-names in Man: Man, Douglas, Rushen, Hentre, Ards (Arddae Huimnonn), Appyn, Nappin, Balthane, Begoade, Bemaccan, Bemahague, Bibaloe, Bollown, etc. II. Pre-Scandinavian place-name elements in Man: slieau (Ir. sliabh), carrick (Ir. carraig, kil- (Mx keeil, Ir. cill), balla- (Mx balley, Ir. baile, magher (Ir. machaire, ScG machair); 3. Pre-Scandinavian place-names without toponymical attestation in Man.

Ardsenlis

8695.
Nicholls (K. W.): Some Patrician sites of Eastern Connacht.
In Dinnseanchas 5 (1972–1973), pp. 114–118.
Senchell Dumaigi; Sendomnach; Ardsenlis; Druime.

arg

3333.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 8. On snow in Ireland.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 280–281.
arg develops semantically from ‘snow’ to ‘drop’; cf. snechta ‘snow’ related to snigid ‘drips’.

argad

640.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Varia: III. Roinnt míbhríonna a d’eascair ó fhoclóir Uí Chléirigh.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 171–177.
On some of the incorrect and misleading meanings in Irish and Scottish dictionaries derived from glosses in Míchéal Ó Cléirigh’s dictionary, Focloir no Sanasan Nua (1643). 1. acht ‘danger’; 2. ailcith ‘a strand stone’; 3. aincheas ‘danger’; 4. aineach ‘horsemanship’; 5. airmid ‘a swan’; 6. aitheallach ‘a second proof’; 7. aithréos ‘manure’; 8. ala(dh) ‘a trout’; 9. argad ‘a hindrance’; 10. bacat ‘a captive’; 11. béim ‘a nation’; 12. coibhchiogh ‘ravenous, fierce’; 13. coichmhe ‘an udder’; 14. díchealtair ‘a park’; 15. fé fiadha ‘a park’; 16. fec ‘a weakness’; 17. feothán ‘a dormouse’; 18. glinn, grinn ‘a fort’, ‘a garrison’; 19. meirceann ‘a finger’; 20. rae ‘a salmon’; 21. rear ‘provision’; 22. samhlat ‘active’; 23. sithbhe ‘a city’; 24. soma ‘a flock of swans’; 25. talchara ‘a generous lover’; 26. tealgadh ‘eating, consuming’; 27. urghais ‘suppression of antiquities’.

argamaint

11411.
Thomsett (Harriet): Meeting on whose terms? The equation of Latin and vernacular literary terminology in the Old Irish glosses.
In Quaestio insularis 3 (2002), pp. 107–120.
On the association of OIr. stoir, argamaint, scél, with L historia, argumentum, fabula in the Old Irish glosses.

argat

4792.
Mallory (James P.): Silver in the Ulster cycle of tales.
In 7th ICCS, Oxford 1983 (1986), pp. 31–78.
Argues that the role attached to silver in the UIster cycle of narratives reflects a material culture of the 6th-9th centuries A.D.

argib

1165.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Varia: IV. 2. On the 2pl. imperative in Scottish Gaelic.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 174–178.
ScG -ibh derives from 2pl. prep. prons used as imperatives, the seeds of which can be traced to OIr. suppletive airci(u)b, argib, ercib ‘go’.
673.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: II. 1. Syntactic comparisons: (a) airci(u)bargibercib.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 168–169.
ad J. Carney, in Ériu 18 (1958), pp. 1-43 (BILL 5527). Discusses forms of the 2 pl. ipv.

arís

1694.
Ó hUrmoltaigh (Nollaig): Arís.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), p. 114.
Arís can have future indefinite time reference ‘later on, sometime later’.

Arlecdon

12782.
James (Alan G.): Varia: A note on the two Barloccos KCB, with Arlecdon CMB.
In JSNS 5 (2011), pp. 169–174.

ar-léici

3294.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 3. airlicud.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 167–169.
air- intensifies or specifies the sense of ‘lending’.

ármag

2531.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Continuity and change in early Irish words for ‘plain’: exploring narrative text and place-name divergence.
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 149–170.
mag, machaire, róe, clár, réid, réide.

Armagh

1394.
Lambkin (B. K.): Patrick, Armagh and Emain Macha.
In Emania 2 (1987), pp. 29–31.
Discusses the episode of Patrick and Dáire and suggests that Armagh was chosen as primatial see because of its importance as druidic centre. vs. R. Sharpe, St. Patrick and the See of Armagh, in CMCS 4 (Winter, 1982), pp. 33–59.
1606.
Sharpe (Richard): St. Patrick and the See of Armagh.
In CMCS 4 (Winter 1982), pp. 33–59.
Explores the chronological gap between Patrick’s death and 7th c. texts relating to the church at Armagh.
2328.
Arthurs (J. B.): BUPNS reprints 7: Macha and Armagh.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 152–157.
Repr. from BUPNS 1/2 (Spring 1953), pp. 37-43; [also repr. as BUPNS 1 (1955), pp. 25-29].

Armaghbrague

2350.
Mooney (B. J.): BUPNS reprints 15: The element ‘brague’ in certain place-names.
In Ainm 8 (1998), pp. 172–174.
Dromorebrague, Lisnabrague, Armaghbrague. [Continued in p. 179.]

Repr. from BUPNS 4/2 (Autumn 1956), pp. 25-27.

ar-muinethar

3027.
Henry (Patrick L.): Interpreting the Gaulish inscription of Chamalières.
In ÉtC 21 (1984), pp. 141–150.
Contains an excursus on OIr. fíad ‘honour; presence’.

ar-neget

740.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 1. Old Irish ar-neget.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 164–167.
ad J. H. W. Penny, Varia: III. Weak and Strong i-verbs in Old Irish, in Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 149-154.

árosc

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

Arran

13354.
Nicolaisen (W. F. H.): Arran place-names: a fresh look.
In Northern studies 28 (1991), pp. 1–13.
4435.
Breeze (Andrew): Some Celtic place-names of Scotland including Arran, Carmunnock, Gogar and Water of May.
In ScotL 19 (2000), pp. 117–134.
1. The isle of Arran; 2. Carmyle, Glasgow; 3. Carmunnock, near Glasgow; 4. The river Gryfe, near Paisley; 5. Watcarrick, near Lockerbie; 6. ‘Crachoctre’, near Coldingham; 7. Gogar, near Edinburgh; 8. Two Angus place-names: Prosen Water and Aberlemno; 9. Arbirlot, near Arbroath; 10. The Water of May, near Perth.
13794.
Breeze (Andrew): Scottish place-names: the way ahead.
In Doonsin’ emerauds (2004), pp. 18–23.
Discusses the following Scottish place-names: 1. Noss Head, Piltanton Burn, Bennachie, and Dunscanby Head; 2. Arran, Cumnock, Girvan, and Irvine; 3. Loquhariot; 4. Pennango and Soutra.

arsé ar

839.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Varia: V. A note on the use of direct speech in Saltair na Rann.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 206–208.
On the use of arsé ar, arsí ar to mark direct speech, and some modern equivalents.

arsí ar

839.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Varia: V. A note on the use of direct speech in Saltair na Rann.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 206–208.
On the use of arsé ar, arsí ar to mark direct speech, and some modern equivalents.

arsie (Umbrian)

900.
Joseph (Lionel S.): A survival from the Italo-Celtic legal vocabulary.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 119–125.
OIr. líthech ‘accused person’ (cf. liïd ‘accuses’) and Lat. lı̄s, lı̄tis ‘lawsuit’; also OIr. ad ‘law’, adae ‘due, fitting, proper’, adas ‘suitable, appropriate to’ and Umbrian arsie ‘sancte’, etc; OIr. coll ‘injury, violation’ and Lat. culpa ‘blame’; cf. *-din- in trédenus ‘three days’ and Lat. nundinum ‘nine days’.

Arthur

1597.
Gillies (William): Arthur in Gaelic tradition. Part I: Folktales and ballads.
In CMCS 2 (Winter 1981), pp. 47–72.
Analyses the content and transmission of Arthurian characters and motifs in Gaelic folktales and ballads.

For part II, see CMCS 3 (Summer, 1982), pp. 41-75.
1601.
Gillies (William): Arthur in Gaelic tradition. Part II: Romances and learned lore.
In CMCS 3 (Summer 1982), pp. 41–75.
Discusses early modern Gaelic prose romances, e.g. Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha, Céilidhe Iosgaide Léithe, Eachtra Mhelóra agus Orlando, Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil, Eachtra Mhacaoimh an Iolair, Caithréim Chonghail Chláiringnigh, Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir; some discussion of associations with Arthur in local legend.

For part I, see CMCS 2 (Winter, 1981), pp. 47-72.
2498.
Smelik (Bernadette): The structure of the Irish Arthurian romance Eachtra mhacaoimh an iolair.
In CMCS 45 (Summer 2003), pp. 43–57.
Analyses the portrayal of King Arthur and the structure of the plot, and concludes that the author did not use an English original but fused a late French Arthurian romance with native Irish elements in a conscious attempt to please an Irish audience.

Artrí

9342.
Zimmer (Stefan): The name of Arthur: a new etymology.
In JCeltL 13 (Mar. 2009), pp. 131–136.
Suggests it is from Celtic *Arto-rı̄g-i̯os, a derivative of *Arto-rı̄χs (= OIr. Artrí).

Artúr

4605.
Jaski (Bart): Early Irish examples of the name ‘Arthur’.
In ZCP 56 (2008), pp. 89–105.
Focuses on the adoption of the name by Irish dinasties in both Britain and Ireland in the 6th to 10th centuries.
15336.
Breeze (Andrew): The name of king Arthur.
In Mediaevistik 28 (2015), pp. 23–35.

áru

4226.
Hamp (Eric P.): áru, áirne.
In Lochlann 6 (1974), pp. 122–123.
Postulates a Celtic etymon *agrēn-.

arudgair (< for-dingair)

369.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Mid. Ir. arudgair.
In Celtica 16 (1984), p. 62.
In a gloss in Mellbretha (see CIH iv 1338.8), from for-dingair.

ás

3017.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 10. Zur Etymologie von irisch ás, fás ‘wachsen’, und der Name der Osseten.
In ZCP 32 (1972), pp. 77–78.
11709.
Watson (Seosamh): ‘Dada’ i nGaeilge na hÉireann agus na hAlban.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 983–1008.
1. , nithinn, a bheag, cineál; 2. dada, tada, rud, neamhní, náit, puinn, se(o)id, pioc, bit, fríd, giob, luid, heat, pingin, ás, bonn, sciúrtóg, screapall; 3. dath, , ceo, seó, leus, poidhs, scaile, steama; 4. sian, seinm, guth, dùrd, focal, puth, diog, cneadadh; 5. blas, gráinne, greim, smailc, deoir; 6. cáil, cruthaitheachd, tarbha, faic(e), tap, car, fionna-feanna, folt.

as

11247.
Watkins (Calvert): Language, culture or history?
In Papers from the parasession on language and behavior (1981), pp. 238–248.
Discusses the Celtic background of the OIr. term nemed and the phrase fear an ais óir occurring in Classical Bardic poetry).

Repr. in Watkins selected writings II, pp. 663-673.
15999.
Bayda (Viktor): Irish constructions with bain.
In Studia Celto-Slavica 7 (2015), pp. 213–227.
Focuses on light-verb constructions consisting of bain with the prepositions as or de.

-as (abstract)

694.
Greene (David): Varia: IV. 1. feras, banas, and some related abstracts.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 155–167.
Studies the formation and meaning of abstract in -as.
4276.
Breatnach (R. A.): Varia: 3. connsaich, v. n. connsachadh.
In SGS 14/2 (1986), pp. 145–146.
Argues that OIr. conas ‘quarrel, fight’ (whence ScG connsaich) is an abstract noun derived from by means of the suffix -as, originally meaning ‘characteristic qualities of a hound’ and therefore an example of semantic shift. Cf. D. Greene, in Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 155-167.

as coitcheann

1877.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Ann coitcheann, as coitcheann.
In Éigse 22 (1987), pp. 135–140.
On the adverbial/impersonal use of the 3sg. m./n. of conjugated prepositions referred to in Bardical syntactical tracts.

as dèidh (ScG)

11231.
Reed (Sylvia L.): Multiple perfects in Scottish Gaelic.
In WCCFL 29 (2012), pp. 389–397.
Investigates the aspectual semantics of the ScG particles air, as dèidh, gu.

as éadan

7462.
Ó Máille (T. S.): Seacht sanasáin Nua-Ghaeilge.
In Fs. de Bhaldraithe (1986), pp. 36–47.
1. as éadan; 2. bosca/boiscín; 3. carca, cargadh; 4.criss cross; 5. dristiúirí; 6. fiúigil, -ín; 7. scread maidne.

-as (in place names)

2278.
Ó Máille (T. S.): Irish place-names in -as, -es, -is, -os, -us.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 125–143.

-as (senchas)

629.
McCone (Kim): OIr. senchae, senchaid and preliminaries on agent noun formation in Celtic.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 1–10.
ad F. Kelly, in Peritia 5 (1986), 74-106. Senchae derives from a compound *seno-kwois(y?)os, meaning ‘old witness’. Senchas represents senchae + abstract suffix -as.
Kelly (Fergus) (ref.)

ásaid

889.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: VII. 3. LU 3161.
In Ériu 36 (1985), pp. 193–194.
Reads ro ás gnóe móir in n-ingin (LU 3161) as *roás gnóe móir, ind ingin (with dative of apposition) and translates as ‘she grew with great beauty, the girl’, thus dismissing the claim that ásaid ‘grows’ is impersonal with two accusatives.
14954.
Pyysalo (Jouna): Ten new Indo-European etymologies for the Celtic languages.
In SCF 12 (2015), pp. 62–79.
1. OIr. oenach- ‘an injury/wound’: OSax. ēndago- ‘day of death’: Hitt. ḫingan- ‘Seuche, Pest, Todesfall’; 2. OIr. airecht- ‘assembly, meeting, conversation’: LAv. vyāxa- ‘Versammlung’; 3. OIr. cumachtae- ‘pouvoir, puissance’: TochB. ekaññe ‘possession, equipment’, AV aṣṭi- ‘Erreichung’; 4. OIr. ás- ‘croissance, fait de grandir/grossir’: Maced. ἄξο- ‘ὑλή'; 5. OBret. iolent ‘precentur’: Lat. hariolā- ‘wahrsagen’; 6. MidIr. cīch- (f.) ‘weibliche Brust’: RV. kı̄́kasā- ‘Brust·bein’; 7. OIr. nái- ‘human being, person’: TochA. napen- ‘Mensch’; 8. OIr. tol- ‘Wille’: RV. turá- ‘Willfährig’; 9. OIr. nūadat- ‘hand, wrist or arm’: RV. nodhā- ‘Elefant’; 10. OIr. aiged ‘visage’: OHG agsiunî- ‘species: Aussehen, Angesicht’.

asaileag (ScG)

3713.
Lockwood (W. B.): Ptarmigan and other Gaelic names.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn 1976), pp. 271–278.
Bird-names: Engl. ptarmigan (< ScG tarmachan), tairmid, stearnal, amhas, asaileag, buigeir, dìrid.

as-beir

1815.
Hamp (Eric P.): Barnu brawd.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 68–75.
Discusses semantically differentiated set of reflexes for PIE *med- ‘announce, pronounce’ (cf. OIr. midithur ‘judge’); also PIE root *bherH- ‘dicere, medd', which yielded OIr. as-beir ‘says’, and the phrase *brneHti brHtun ‘pronounce a pronouncement’ > ‘judge (a judgement)', which gave in Irish berid breith and Welsh barnu brawd.

ascalt

15229.
Peters (Cherie N.): Translating food shortages in the Irish chronicles, A.D. 500–1170.
In CMCS 71 (Summer 2016), pp. 29–58.
Investigates the precise meaning of OIr. ascalt and tercae in annalistic sources.

asse

3334.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 9. asse.
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 281–282.
asse < *ad-sād-s-io- (*sād- = W hawdd); anse < *n̥-sād-s-io-.

Association for the Improvement of Prisons

1714.
de Brún (Pádraig): Irish in the prisons.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), p. 392.
Discussion of statistics for Irish-speaking prisoners in 21 counties contained in an account (dated 21 January 1821) by R. J. T. Orpen, secretary to the Association for the Improvement of Prisons, contained in MS TCD 7644.

Assylin, Co. Roscommon

3411.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth): The inauguration of Tairdelbach Ó Conchobair at Áth an Termoinn.
In Peritia 12 (1998), pp. 351–358.
Identifies Áth an Termoinn with Áth Carpait, in the termonland of Es mac nEirc, at Boyle (Co. Roscommon).

astal

2419.
Brown (Alan K.): Old Irish astal, Old English æstel: the common etymology.
In CMCS 24 (Winter 1992), pp. 75–92.
Both < Lat. (h)astella, originally meaning ‘plectrum’, based on the evidence from an episode of the Irish Life of St. Brendan.

astol

2419.
Brown (Alan K.): Old Irish astal, Old English æstel: the common etymology.
In CMCS 24 (Winter 1992), pp. 75–92.
Both < Lat. (h)astella, originally meaning ‘plectrum’, based on the evidence from an episode of the Irish Life of St. Brendan.

ā-subjunctive

792.
Bammesberger (Alfred): The origin of the ā-subjunctive in Irish.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 65–72.

a[t] tarisi-siu limm

535.
Baumgarten (Rolf): Varia: IV. A crux in Táin bó Fraích.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 235–241.
Discusses the grammar, idiom and contents of the dialogue in TBF lines 361-362 (as ed. by W. Meid 1967 [BILL 4991]).

a-t:baill

12815.
Vernet (Mariona): Gr. βάλλω ‘I throw’, OIr. a-t:baill ‘he/she dies’, Lat. ualleō ‘to die’: some considerations on the reconstruction of the PIE verbal root *gwelh1- ‘to pass away, to die; to throw’.
11805.
Hill (Eugen): Silbische Liquiden vor Nasalen im Inselkeltischen und das Problem der Nasalpräntien vom Typ air. sernaid, kymr. -sarnu.
In KF 5 (2010–2012), pp. 157–184.
Discusses the continuation in Insular Celtic of the PIE nasal presents made to roots in final laryngeal (exemplified by OIr. sernaid, ernaid, marnaid, ·cella, ·ella, -t·baill, ·gnin).

a-tá

8763.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): On the origin of the present subjunctive of the substantive verb in Old Irish.
In Fs. Watkins (1998), pp. 405–412.
11634.
Broderick (George): Latin and Celtic: the substantive verb.
In Ilteangach, ilseiftiúil [Fs. N. J. A. Williams] (2012), pp. 29–47.
Suggests PCelt. *tā-ije/o- (> OIr. a-tá) developed as the unmarked substantive verb in Insular Celtic due to Latin influence.

Republ. in Glotta 91 (2015), pp. 3-14.

atá … ó

765.
Greene (David): A recent semantic shift in Insular Celtic.
In ZCP 34 (1975), pp. 43–59.
Discusses the semantic change (need >) lack > desire in (II) Irish (díth, dígbál (> mod. díobháil), feidhm, do-esta (> mod. teastuighidh), atá …ó, oireann …do, (III) Manx (laccal, feme), and (IV) Scottish Gaelic (tha …a dhìth air …, is e a tha bho …).

atá (responsive)

317.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 1. d’fhóbair dom tuitim.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 120–123.
Discusses is ed mod, is ing, is ar éigin ‘scarcely, hardly’, and is obair ‘it is hard, difficult’. Suggests that ModIr. fhóbair, (fh)obair ‘almost’ represents a confusion of impersonal verb fóbair and use of obair replacing earlier mod.
3770.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Notes on Irish idioms: 2. atá (), introducing an answer.
In Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 123–124.
Supplies an example of this construction from LL. Cf. Celtica 12 (1977), pp. 188-191 [Varia: 2. is ann : is amlaid].

at-baill

475.
Campanile (Enrico): A note on the classification of some Old Irish verbs.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 99–103.
1. do-lin (pl. du-linat) ‘flows’; 2. ara-chrin ‘decays, fails’; 3. ro-cluinethar ‘hears’; 4. at-baill ‘dies’; 5. marnid ‘betrays’; 6. ro-finnadar ‘gets to know’; 7. -gnin ‘knows’.
2764.
Mikhailova (Tatiana), Nikolaeva (Natalia): The denotations of death in Goidelic: to the question of Celtic eschatological conceptions.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 93–115.
Studies the etymology and semantics of Irish expressions denoting ‘death’ as occurring in the texts, with the aim of retrieving the Celtic attitudes towards death.
12815.
Vernet (Mariona): Gr. βάλλω ‘I throw’, OIr. a-t:baill ‘he/she dies’, Lat. ualleō ‘to die’: some considerations on the reconstruction of the PIE verbal root *gwelh1- ‘to pass away, to die; to throw’.

at-ballat a beóil

3755.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge zur vergleichenden Erforschung des Irischen: 5. Altir. at-ballat a beóil ‘er stirbt’.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 267–268.
Finds parallels in Ugaritic and in the Balkan Sprachbund.

ate

2995.
Greene (David): The responsive in Irish and Welsh.
In Fs. Sommerfelt (1972), pp. 59–72.
pp. 60-65: surveys the system of responsive in Early and Modern Irish (including Scottish Gaelic), and argues it continues an archaic state of affairs.

áth

5020.
Mac Aodha (Breandán S.): The element Ath/Ford in Irish place-names.
In Nomina 11 (1987), pp. 115–122.
Discusses in particular the collocation béal an átha.
11966.
Blažek (Václav), Dočkalová (Lenka): On Indo-European roads.
In JIES 39/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2011), pp. 299–341.
Includes a discussion of the etymology of the Old Irish terms áth, belach, bóthar, casán, conar, drochet, éol, rith, sét, séol, slige.

ath-

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

Áth an Mhoilc

16272.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): Teorainneacha, áthanna agus iomáin.
In THJ (2008), pp. 164–174.
Examines placenames containing references to hurling: Áth an Mhoilc (Ahawilk); Drom Cromáin (Appletown); Droichead na gCamán, Tobar na gCamán (Commaun Bridge, Tobernagommaun); Áth na gCamán (Aughnagommaun); Áth na nUrlainn (Urlingford).

Áth an Termoinn

3411.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth): The inauguration of Tairdelbach Ó Conchobair at Áth an Termoinn.
In Peritia 12 (1998), pp. 351–358.
Identifies Áth an Termoinn with Áth Carpait, in the termonland of Es mac nEirc, at Boyle (Co. Roscommon).

Áth Carpait

3411.
FitzPatrick (Elizabeth): The inauguration of Tairdelbach Ó Conchobair at Áth an Termoinn.
In Peritia 12 (1998), pp. 351–358.
Identifies Áth an Termoinn with Áth Carpait, in the termonland of Es mac nEirc, at Boyle (Co. Roscommon).

Áth Carpat

15324.
Gosling (Paul): Placing names in Táin bó Cúailnge: the river ‘Níth’ and the ford `Áth Carpat’.
In JCLAHS 27/3 (2011), pp. 366–378.
Identified with Castletown river and the ford at Toberona, respectively.

Áth Chind Chon

18379.
Hicks (Ronald): The rout of Ailill and Medb: myth on the landscape.
In Emania 24 (2018), pp. 19–34.
Analyses the itinerary of retreat described in Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó §§19-20 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1935): Mag Ailbe, Roiriu, Áth Midbine, Maistiu, Druim Criaig, Ráith Imgain, Fid nGaible, Áth mac Lúgnai, Druim Dá Maige, Áth Chind Chon.

Áth Cliath

3934.
Clarke (Howard B.): The topographical development of Early Medieval Dublin.
In JRSAI 107 (1977), pp. 29–51.

Áth Clíath

18407.
Simpson (Linzi): Pre-Viking and early Viking-age Dublin: some research questions.
In Medieval Dublin 10 (2010), pp. 49–92.
Also comments on the place-names Dubhlinn and Áth Clíath.

Áth Fhada

3408.
Manning (Conleth): Daire Mór identified.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 359–369.
Longfordpass (alias Durrihy), Co. Tipperary.

Addenda in Peritia 12 (1998), p. 270.

Áth Fir Diad

10826.
Ó Flaithearta (Mícheál): The etymologies of (Fer) Diad.
In Ulidia 2 (2009), pp. 218–225.
Suggests diad in personal name (Fer) Diad derives from gen. *dwi-pod-os of PIE *dwi-pod-s ‘two-footed’.

Áth Gablae

3058.
Fleuriot (Léon): Brittonica et Gallica: 27. Rith er Gabail et Áth Gablae.
In ÉtC 24 (1987), pp. 200–201.
Draws attention to a “gué de la fourche” attested in both British and Irish.

Áth Liac Find

18292.
Soverino (Tiziana): ‘Here, Finn… take this and give him a lick of it’: two place-lore stories about Fi(o)nn Mac Cum(h)aill in medieval irish literature and modern oral tradition.
In Landscape and myth in North-Western Europe (2019), pp. 147–161.
Compares and contrasts the onomastic lore connected to two fords: Ballyleague, Co. Roscommon [OIr. Áth Líac Find ], and ‘The Steps’ at Cullentragh, Co. Longford.

Áth Luain

794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.

Áth mac Lúgnai

18379.
Hicks (Ronald): The rout of Ailill and Medb: myth on the landscape.
In Emania 24 (2018), pp. 19–34.
Analyses the itinerary of retreat described in Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó §§19-20 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1935): Mag Ailbe, Roiriu, Áth Midbine, Maistiu, Druim Criaig, Ráith Imgain, Fid nGaible, Áth mac Lúgnai, Druim Dá Maige, Áth Chind Chon.

Áth Midbine

18379.
Hicks (Ronald): The rout of Ailill and Medb: myth on the landscape.
In Emania 24 (2018), pp. 19–34.
Analyses the itinerary of retreat described in Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó §§19-20 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1935): Mag Ailbe, Roiriu, Áth Midbine, Maistiu, Druim Criaig, Ráith Imgain, Fid nGaible, Áth mac Lúgnai, Druim Dá Maige, Áth Chind Chon.

Áth na Foraire

7405.
Muhr (Kay): The early place-names of County Armagh.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 1–54.
Part I (Secular): (A) Armagh plain: Macha, Emain Macha, Oenach Macha, Drumconwell, Creeveroe and divisions; Loughnashade, Kings Stables, Ráth Cimbaíth, Tullyworgle, Bull’s Track; (B) South Armagh: Slieve Gullion, Sliab Monduirn, Sliab Fuait, Áth na Foraire, Béal Átha an Airgid, Dorsey, Loch Echtra, Nemed, Callan, Ardachadh, Cloenloch, Forkill, Midluachair, Fiodh Conaille, Fathom, Carnbane, Búrach Ulad. Part II (Lives of St. Patrick): Ind Fherta, Ard Macha, Ard Sailech, Telach na Licce, Tamlachta Bó, Cenngoba, Oenach Macha, Nemed.

Áth na gCamán

16272.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): Teorainneacha, áthanna agus iomáin.
In THJ (2008), pp. 164–174.
Examines placenames containing references to hurling: Áth an Mhoilc (Ahawilk); Drom Cromáin (Appletown); Droichead na gCamán, Tobar na gCamán (Commaun Bridge, Tobernagommaun); Áth na gCamán (Aughnagommaun); Áth na nUrlainn (Urlingford).

Áth na gCarbad

2282.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): Áth na gCarbad.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 194–199.
Carbine Bridge, Co. Tipperary.

Áth na nUrlainn

16272.
Ó Maolfabhail (Art): Teorainneacha, áthanna agus iomáin.
In THJ (2008), pp. 164–174.
Examines placenames containing references to hurling: Áth an Mhoilc (Ahawilk); Drom Cromáin (Appletown); Droichead na gCamán, Tobar na gCamán (Commaun Bridge, Tobernagommaun); Áth na gCamán (Aughnagommaun); Áth na nUrlainn (Urlingford).

Áth Uí Chanannáin

5539.
Ó Canann (Tomás G.): Áth Uí Chanannáin and the toponymy of medieval Mide.
In RíM 8/4 (1992–1993), pp. 78–83.

athach

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

athaig

8150.
Uhlich (Jürgen): Altirisch arae ‚Wagenlenker‘, aithesc ‚Antwort‘, keltische Präverbien auf *-i und die frühe Apokope von *-i.
In ZCP 57 (2009–2010), pp. 141–160.
On the auslaut of the Proto-Irish form of Celtic preverbs originally ending in *-i, with special reference to OIr. a(i)r- and a(i)th-. Includes a criticism of P. Schrijver's revision (in Ériu 45 (1995), pp. 151-189) of K. McCone's early apocope of *-i.

athair

2934.
Schmidt (Karl Horst): Zur Entwicklung einiger indogermanischer Verwandtschaftsnamen im Keltischen.
In ÉtC 16 (1979), pp. 117–122.
OIr. athair, máthair, aite, muimme, macc, auë.

atharrach

506.
Ní Dhomhnaill (Cáit): Focail i saothar Dháibhidh Uí Bhruadair.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 461–464.
1. atharrach; 2. feidheal; 3. gail; 4. saltair; 5. scaradh; 6. suim.

athchomarc

3773.
Carey (John): Three notes: 3. ad Celtica 18, 97-100.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 128–129.
On the rendering of Lat. thalamus and frons by Ir. athchomarc and togairm respectively in Saltair na Rann.

Athfhotla

9463.
Clancy (Thomas Owen): Atholl, Banff, Earn and Elgin: ‘new Irelands’ in the east revisited.
In Bile ós chrannaibh [Fs. Gillies] (2010), pp. 79–102.
Appendix: Early forms of main names discussed (with references).

athgabáil

254.
Binchy (D. A.): Distraint in Irish law.
In Celtica 10 (1973), pp. 22–71.
On athgabáil, etc. in Cethairṡlicht athgabálae, etc.

athir

1214.
Schrijver (Peter): On the nature and origin of word-initial h- in the Würzburg glosses.
In Ériu 48 (1997), pp. 205–227.
1. Introduction; 2. The Würzburg Glosses: material; 3.Evaluation: The status of h-; 4. The origins of h-; 5. The Ogam letter húath; 6. Counter-evidence: athir; 7. Conclusions. Concludes that OIr. h- of composite origin is phonemic rather than orthographic in many instances.

Athirne

802.
Lubotsky (Alexander): Varia: IV. On the alliteration in The guesting of Athirne.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 170–171.
Restores ‘linking alliteration’ by transposing lines 6 and 7 in poem beg. Glass úar errach aigide (as ed. by K. Meyer, in Ériu 7 (1914), p. 4 (Best2 1173), thus rendering D. Greene's emendations unnecessary (in A golden treasury of Irish poetry (1967), p. 141 [BILL 5542]).
Greene (D.) (ref.), Meyer (K.) (ref.)

athláech

1984.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): Caillech and other terms for veiled women in medieval Irish texts.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 71–96.
Discusses terms in Old Irish and Latin caillech, cétmuinter, caillech aithrige, ailithir, fedb; clientella, mulier, uxor, vidua.

Atholl

9463.
Clancy (Thomas Owen): Atholl, Banff, Earn and Elgin: ‘new Irelands’ in the east revisited.
In Bile ós chrannaibh [Fs. Gillies] (2010), pp. 79–102.
Appendix: Early forms of main names discussed (with references).

Atholl brose (Engl.)

13626.
Sayers (William): Brose, Atholl brose, spurtle and thivel.
In ScotL 31–32 (2012–2013), pp. 59–63.
Also considers the possibility of a correspondence between unattested early Gaelic *brot athóla and‘Atholl brose’.

attá

5809.
Roma (Elisa): Brevi note sull’etimologia di irlandese antico attá.
In SC 2 (2003), pp. 77–87.

at(t)ba

1421.
Murray (Kevin): Varia: VII. at(t)ba / éc at(t)bai.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 185–187.
att-ba is a compound of att ‘swelling’ and ba ‘death’; éc at(t)bai ‘death by tumour’; other compounds with bath ‘death, destruction’ or ba ‘death’ as second elements.

atúd

3056.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: 28. Terms for ‘torch’ and stems for ‘kindle’: 1. OIr. a(i)thinne and atúd.
In ÉtC 24 (1987), p. 186.

at·baill

3146.
Tremblay (Xavier): Études sur le verbe vieil-irlandais: 1. La classe B V de Thurneysen; 2. ro-laë et les parfaits de bases ultimae laryngalis.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 151–165.
1. ara·chrin, at·baill, do·lin, at·gnin, etc. 2. -cuirethar.
3292.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 10. at·bail(l), (gaé) bulga.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 179–182.
bulga is an old compound *balu-gaisos ‘spear of mortal pain’, containing the same root as the verb at·bail(l).

at·gnin

3146.
Tremblay (Xavier): Études sur le verbe vieil-irlandais: 1. La classe B V de Thurneysen; 2. ro-laë et les parfaits de bases ultimae laryngalis.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 151–165.
1. ara·chrin, at·baill, do·lin, at·gnin, etc. 2. -cuirethar.

at·tá

3172.
Kortlandt (Frederik): Three notes on the Old Irish verb: 1. , boí ‘was’.
In ÉtC 34 (1998–2000), pp. 143–144.

*au

3293.
Hamp (Eric P.): Varia: I. 2. Notes on some Indo-European preverbs.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 163–167.
*e(p)i- in é(i)thech (with same base as díthech and fre(i)tech); *eti- in e(i)tech; óL < *au and *apo > *ao; OIr. ind-, imbL, íar(m-), ol, sech, coh, doL, ro (idiosyncratic) related to L pro-sum.

áu (áo)

630.
Uhlich (Jürgen): On the fate of intervocalic *-- in Old Irish, especially between neutral vowels.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 11–48.
Includes discussion of hypercorrect spellings of au for u, which gave rise to áu for ú; unexpected áu (áo) supported by rhyme; some cases of unjustified spellings óu (ou).

áu (‘away’)

482.
Hamp (Eric P.): Two etymologies.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 173–177.
1. áu ‘away’ [On adverbs deriving from (conjugated) prepositions]; 2. `(any)thing’.

au (for u)

630.
Uhlich (Jürgen): On the fate of intervocalic *-- in Old Irish, especially between neutral vowels.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 11–48.
Includes discussion of hypercorrect spellings of au for u, which gave rise to áu for ú; unexpected áu (áo) supported by rhyme; some cases of unjustified spellings óu (ou).

áu (for ú)

630.
Uhlich (Jürgen): On the fate of intervocalic *-- in Old Irish, especially between neutral vowels.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 11–48.
Includes discussion of hypercorrect spellings of au for u, which gave rise to áu for ú; unexpected áu (áo) supported by rhyme; some cases of unjustified spellings óu (ou).

aub

542.
Watkins (Calvert): ‘River’ in Celtic and Indo-European.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 80–89.
Argues that the comparison with Anatolian proves the antiquity of Celtic n-stem paradigm *abō *abens.
752.
Wagner (H.): Zu ‘indogermanischen’ Wörtern für ‘Fluss’ bzw. ‘Wasser’.
In ZCP 33 (1974), pp. 1–5.
Discussion of words for ‘river’ and ‘water’ in Indo-European languages. Some discussion of Ir. aub, Monand, Manannán, mac lir, Min (gen. Mena; name of river in Co. Antrim).
3211.
Hamp (Eric P.): Celtica Indogermanica: 3. *Haap-(Xon-) ‘river’.
In ZCP 37 (1979), pp. 169–170.
Comments on the Indo-European background of OIr. ab.
10029.
McCone (Kim): OIr. aub “river’ and amnair “maternal uncle” .
In MSS 53 (1992), pp. 101–111.
18030.
Schrijver (Peter): Apes, dwarfs, rivers and Indo-European derivation.
In Per aspera ad asteriscos [Fs. Rasmussen] (2004), pp. 507–511.
Discusses the etym. of OIr. abacc and its relationship to aub.

auchaide

10760.
Corthals (Johan): Altirisch *auchaidir und griechisch ἀκούω.
In HS 103 (1990), pp. 269–271.

audacht

2620.
Henry (P. L.): The cruces of Audacht Morainn.
In ZCP 39 (1982), pp. 33–53.
Criticism of the translation by F. Kelly in Audacht Morainn (Dublin, 1976), especially with regard to the Old Irish terms fír, flaith, fírinne, fír flathemon and to the terminal phrases at the end of §§21, 52-53 and 63.

auë

2934.
Schmidt (Karl Horst): Zur Entwicklung einiger indogermanischer Verwandtschaftsnamen im Keltischen.
In ÉtC 16 (1979), pp. 117–122.
OIr. athair, máthair, aite, muimme, macc, auë.
3233.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The sister’s son in early Irish literature.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 128–160.
On the significance of the maternal kindred in early Irish literature, as exemplified by Christ’s relationship with the Jews, Bres’s with the Túatha Dé Danann and Cú Chulainn’s with Conchobar.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 65-94.

áuë

14978.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Áui, Úi, : a palaeographical problem?
In Early medieval Ireland and Europe [Fs. Ó Cróinín] (2015), pp. 301–309.
Argues that the abbreviation h. for úa etc. derives from Tironian a.

áugaire

822.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: IV. 1. On the agent suffix -e in Irish.
In Ériu 34 (1983), p. 194.
áugaire, úgaire, óegaire, Bóguine, ráthbuige, sedguine, corrguine, cuthchaire, cáinte.

Aughagrany

16116.
Quinn (John): The identification of Aughagrany and its correlation with Achadh Gréine in Betha Beraigh (The life of Saint Barry).
In Ainm 12 (2014), pp. 117–144.
ad C. Plummer, BNÉ ii, p. 23 (identified with Aughagrany, bar. Mohill, Co. Leitrim).

Aughrim, Battle of (1691)

1514.
Ó Buachalla (Breandán): Dán ar Chath Eachroma.
In Éigse 15/2 (Geimhreadh 1973), pp. 117–123.
Two versions of the same song on the Battle of Aughrim [1691] edited with notes in Irish. Version 1, beg. A dhaoine tá líonta dhen daonnacht, ed. from MS QUL Bunting 7 (no. 68), normalised. Version 2, beg. 'S a dhaoine a bhfuil maoineadh nó spré agaibh, reproduced from Seán Ó Fionnagáin’s ed. in An Stoc (Eanáir 1928) 3; with notes.
Ó Fionnagáin (Seán) (ref.)

áui

14978.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Áui, Úi, : a palaeographical problem?
In Early medieval Ireland and Europe [Fs. Ó Cróinín] (2015), pp. 301–309.
Argues that the abbreviation h. for úa etc. derives from Tironian a.

Áulomm (Ailill)

16528.
Downey (Clodagh): Who was Ailill Moṡaulum?
In Celtica 29 (2017), pp. 38–54.
Suggests the possibility of a Ciarraige origin for Moṡaulum, Ailill (Áulomm)'s alias in Scéla Moṡauluim.

Auluim (Corco)

723.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Onomata.
In Ériu 30 (1979), pp. 165–180.
1. Dar Óma (related to Ogmios); 2. Tairdelbach; 3. Ó Loith; 4. Uí Chobthaigh and their pedigrees; 5. Ua Carráin, Ó Corráin, (O) Curran(e); 6. Máel Dúin mac Áeda and Brega; 7. Dub Indrecht mac Cathassaich, King of Araid; 8. Corco Auluim (Úlum); 9. The supposed monastery of Alltraige Caille; 10. Cnámraige.

aur-

1163.
Ó Maolalaigh (Roibeard): Varia: III. Vocalic variation in air-, aur-.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 163–169.

Ausaile

11536.
Dumville (David N.): Auxilius, Iserninus, Secundinus, and Benignus.
In Saint Patrick 493-1993 (1993), pp. 89–105.

awin (Mx)

2122.
Broderick (George): Sprachkontakt und Sprachgeschichte der Insel Man im Rahmen ihrer Ortsnamen.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 57–65.

æal

8533.
Kelly (Fergus): Cauldron imagery in a legal passage on judges (CIH IV 1307.38-1308.7).
In Celtica 26 (2010), pp. 31–43.
From Egerton 88; edition, with English translation and linguistic discussion (particulary of the terms tellach, grísach, æal, drolam, innber).