Authors and Textual Sources

Saighdiúir, Seán

14740.
Ó Fiannachta (Pádraig) (ed.): I humbly beg pardon, ná trácht a thuilleadh im’ bhearta-sa, by Seán Saighdiúir.
In An barántas (1978), pp. 206–207, [no. 66 (ii)].
In a mixture of Irish and English; from Maynooth M9.

Saignén teintide

14610.
Carey (John): The lore of the fiery arrow.
In End and beyond (2014), pp. 705–713.
Text from RIA D iv 2 with variants from Leabhar Breac; with English translation. Includes a poem beg. A Dhe mhair, co n-agbainn mo dí erail (7 qq.), atributed to Moling (cf. Eugene O’Curry, Best1, p. 121 [Scuip a Fanat]).

Sáirséal, Pádraig

1483.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): Slán chum Pádraic Sáirséal.
In Éigse 14/3 (Samhradh 1972), pp. 215–236.
Song beg. A Phádraig Sáirséal, slán go dtí thú. [1.] Seán Ó Dálaigh [ob. 1878] agus an “Nation” ; [2.] An t-aistriúchán a rinne Mangan; [3.] Leagan Uí Dhálaigh curtha go Luimneach; [4.] An rann nár aistrigh Mangan; [5.] An leagan den amhrán a fuair Ó Comhraí [beg. Is baintreabhach bhocht misi, a d’fhág Dia breóidhte; ed. from MS UCD O’Curry 14]; [6.] Macalla dáin ó aimsir Shéamuis; [7.] An tagairt d’Eachraim; [8.] Dhá rann bhunúsacha; [9.] Na leaganacha Ultacha; [10.] Suim ag Ó Dálaigh i nDán Dhiarmada mhic Sheáin Bhuí; [11.] Lorg an Bhéarla.

Sall, Andrew FitzBennet (1612–1686)

1327.
Breeze (Andrew): Two Irish Jesuits: Andrew Sall (1612–86) and Andrew Sall (1624–82).
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 175–178.
ad A. Breeze, in Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 100-102. On the cousins Andrew FitzBennet Sall and Andrew FitzJohn Sall, based on Fr Francis Finegan’s unpublished A biographical dictionary of Irish Jesuits in the time of the Society’s third Irish mission 1598-1773.

Sall, Andrew FitzJohn (1624–1682)

1327.
Breeze (Andrew): Two Irish Jesuits: Andrew Sall (1612–86) and Andrew Sall (1624–82).
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 175–178.
ad A. Breeze, in Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 100-102. On the cousins Andrew FitzBennet Sall and Andrew FitzJohn Sall, based on Fr Francis Finegan’s unpublished A biographical dictionary of Irish Jesuits in the time of the Society’s third Irish mission 1598-1773.
5905.
McCaughey (Terence): Andrew Sall (1624–82): textual editor and facilitator of the Irish translation of the Old Testament.
In Unity in diversity (2004), pp. 153–171.

Saltair Chaisil

1888.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): The Psalter of Cashel: a provisional list of contents.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 107–130.

Saltair na rann

407.
Carey (John): The Heavenly City in Saltair na Rann.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 87–104.
The architectural scheme of the ríched has as sources Adomnán’s De locis sanctis, a ‘Long Latin’ text of Visio Sancti Pauli, and an ‘Old Latin’ translation of Ezekiel.
12580.
Ó Dochartaigh (Caitríona): Poems 138-41 in Saltair na rann.
In Saltair saíochta [Fs. Mac Eoin] (2013), pp. 297–310.
385.
Carey (John): Cosmology in Saltair na Rann.
In Celtica 17 (1985), pp. 33–52.
SR 21-280 is based on a lost eighth-century cosmological tract drawing on: De ordine creaturarum (Pseudo-Isidore); Pliny’s Historia naturalis, ii; Isidore of Seville; etc.
11037.
Mathis (Kate Louise): Gaelic gemina opera: the verse and prose texts of Saltair na rann and Scél saltrach na rann.
In SGS 28 (2011), pp. 1–20.
Explores the hypothesis that Scél saltrach na rann and Saltair na rann should be regarded as a medieval Irish example of opus geminatum (a work consisting of twinned prose and verse texts).
416.
Carey (John): Angelology in Saltair na Rann.
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 1–8.
The angelology of Pseudo-Dionysius, as transmitted by Gregory the Great (Homiliae in evangelium); fantastic names with distant origin in 1 Enoch; a counting system based on Latin military nomenclature.
12797.
Murdoch (Brian): An early Irish Adam and Eve: Saltair na rann and the traditions of the fall.
In Mediaeval studies 35 (1973), pp. 146–177.
635.
Murdoch (Brian): Saltair na Rann XXV-XXXIV: from Abraham to Joseph.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 93–119.
Continues commentary on SR, following the author’s The Irish Adam and Eve Story from Saltair na Rann: Volume II, commentary (Dublin, 1976) and From the Flood to the Tower of Babel, in Ériu 40 (1989), 69-92.
12799.
Ericksen (Janet Schrunk): Legalizing the Fall of man.
In Medium ævum 74/2 (2005), pp. 205–220.
1066.
Murdoch (Brian): From the Flood to the Tower of Babel: some notes on Saltair na Rann XIII-XXIV.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 69–92.
13573.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The creation of the world in Saltair na rann.
In Celtic cosmology (2014), pp. 144–164.
794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.
14657.
Greene (David), Kelly (Fergus), Murdoch (Brian): The Irish Adam and Eve story from Saltair na rann.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1976.
Vol. 1: Text and translation, by David Greene and Fegus Kelly. 113 pp.
Vol. 2: Commentary, by Brian Murdoch. 162 pp.

Edition of Cantos 4-12 (lines 833-2240, 2385-8). Text from Rawl. B 502 with variants from RIA 24 P 27 and Leabhar Breac.

Rev. by
Máire Herbert, in Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh, 1978), pp. 411-413.
Pierre-Yves Lambert, in ÉtC 18 (1981), p. 374.
Gearóid Mac Eoin, in StH 19 (1979), pp. 194-200.
J. E. Caerwyn Williams, in StC 12-13 (1977-1978), p. 506 (Vol. 1).
839.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Varia: V. A note on the use of direct speech in Saltair na Rann.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 206–208.
On the use of arsé ar, arsí ar to mark direct speech, and some modern equivalents.
15009.
Murdoch (Brian): The apocryphal Adam and Eve in medieval Europe: vernacular translations and adaptations of the Vita Adae et Evae.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. x + 292 pp.
Chap. 2: Ireland.

Rev. by
John Carey, in Peritia 21 (2010), pp. 346-348.
Zbigniew Izydorczyk, in Speculum 86/4 (Oct., 2011), pp. 1100-1103.
Sarah Rowles, in CMCS 59 (Summer, 2010), pp. 87-89.
3773.
Carey (John): Three notes: 3. ad Celtica 18, 97-100.
In Celtica 20 (1988), pp. 128–129.
On the rendering of Lat. thalamus and frons by Ir. athchomarc and togairm respectively in Saltair na Rann.
15590.
McNamara (Martin), Wright (Charles D.) (app. auth.): The (fifteen) signs before Doomsday in Irish tradition.
In WST 20/2 (2007), pp. 223–254.
Examines Irish and Latin texts containing the legend of the XV Signs. In Appendix: Catechetical text containing some parallels with the Apocalypse of Thomas, edited by Charles D. Wright.
1773.
Carney (James): The dating of early Irish verse texts, 500-1100.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 177–216.
I. Chronological list of poems (with references). II. Historical anchorage. III. Metrical and linguistic phenomena (includes: normalized version of poem beg. Nibu chroíb chrínḟredo with Engl. translation; discussion of poem beg. Ní car Brigit buadach bith).

Incl. Addendum on the authorship of Saltair na Rann and on the term céli Dé.

1846.
Carey (John): A tract on the Creation.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 1–9.
Entitled De operibus Dei; edited from Egerton 92, Egerton 1782 and Harley 432, with apparatus criticus and translation.
1882.
Carey (John): Visio Sancti Pauli and the Saltair's hell.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 39–44.
Argues that Canto V is influenced by Latin Redactions of the Apocalypse.
2019.
Breatnach (P. A.): More on Ware’s Psalter Narann.
In Éigse 31 (1999), pp. 133–134.
More evidence to support C. Breatnach's view (in Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 109-32) that it is the old name of the second vellum section of Rawlinson B 502.
2001.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Rawlinson B 502, Lebar Glinne Dá Locha and Saltair na Rann.
In Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 109–132.
Argues that Saltair na Rann is the old name for the second vellum part of MS Rawlinson B 502, against P. Ó Riain's identification of this MS with the lost Book of Glendalough (in Éigse 18 (1981), pp. 161-76). Also on the textual history of the Pedigrees of the Saints, and the poems Druim Ceta Céte na Náem, Colum Cille co Dia domerail, Tánic sam slán sóer, Fuitt co bráth and Cia lín don rígraid ráin ruaid.
2618.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): Observations on Saltair na Rann.
In ZCP 39 (1982), pp. 1–28.
Argues that it was composed by Airbertach mac Cosse who ceased work on the poem not earlier than 990. Appendix includes translation of Canto 152, with notes.
4604.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): The Book of Glendalough: a continuing investigation.
In ZCP 56 (2008), pp. 71–88.
Addresses the issues raised by C. Breatnach (in Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 109-132, Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 40-45, Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 9-26) and B. Ó Cuív (in Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Bodleian Library at Oxford and Oxford College Libraries I, 2003) with respect to the view that MS Rawlinson B 502 is to be identified with the Book of Glendalough.
4897.
Carey (John): Questions of interpolation in the opening cantos of Saltair na Rann.
In PHCC 6 (1986), pp. 69–82.
Studies the structure of cantos I-III.

Sanas Cormaic

10549.
Moran (Pádraic): ‘A living speech’? The pronunciation of Greek in early medieval Ireland.
In Ériu 61 (2011), pp. 29–57.
Investigates the pronunciation of Greek in medieval Ireland based on a examination of Greek words in early Irish glossaries (O’Mulconry’s Glossary, Sanas Cormaic, Dúil Dromma Cetta).
2961.
Isaac (G. R.): A note on Cormac’s Pictish brooch.
In JCeltL 9 (Nov. 2005), pp. 73–82.
Argues, through comparison of OIr. catait, cartait with W cathet, that the original form of the borrowed Pictish word was *kazdet-.
737.
Mac an Bhaird (Alan): Varia: II. Tadhg mac Céin and the badgers.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 150–155.
Earliest recension of story of Cormac son of Tadhg mac Céin and the badgers (occurring under the lemma Gaileng in Sanas Cormaic), ed. with Engl. transl. and notes from MSS RIA D ii 1 (Book of Uí Mhaine), TCD 1318 (H 2.16; YBL), RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac). Story reflects a dietary taboo based on older original meaning of tadhg ‘badger’.
8847.
Russell (Paul): Poets, power and possessions in medieval Ireland: some stories from Sanas Cormaic.
In Law, literature and society (2008), pp. 9–45.
2233.
Russell (Paul): The sounds of a silence: the growth of Cormac’s glossary.
In CMCS 15 (Summer 1988), pp. 1–30.
Incl. survey of extant native glossaries and their MS versions.
12215.
Arbuthnot (Sharon J.): Finn, Ferchess and the rincne: versions compared.
In The Gaelic Finn tradition (2012), pp. 62–80.
Explains the reference to number five in the entry on rincne in Cormac’s glossary (Corm. Y 1084).
3474.
Watkins (Calvert): Varia: III. 2. In essar dam do ā?.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 161–165.
On the word á ‘wagon, cart’ and the verse which glosses it in Cormac’s Glossary, beg. In essar dam do ā.
4676.
Rodway (Simon): ‘Gaulish’ megaliths in Ireland? Gall in Sanas Cormaic.
In CMCS 55 (Summer 2008), pp. 41–50.
Argues that Cormac’s derivation of OIr. gall ‘standing stone’ (Corm. Y 683) < Gall (= L Gallus) is unfounded and criticises the view that this entry provides evidence for an Irish tradition of Gaulish settlement in Ireland.
3668.
Falileyev (Alexander): Father of muse and son of inspiration.
In StC 32 (1998), pp. 277–278.
Discusses OIr. mac uad (Corm. Y 599) and its relationship to W tad awen (in Talhaearn’s epithet Tat Aguen).
12600.
Arbuthnot (Sharon J.): Only fools and horses: dá n-ó bill and dá n-ó pill in medieval Irish texts.
In CMCS 65 (Summer 2013), pp. 49–56.
Suggests the phrase dá n-ó bill (in the glosses to Félire Óengusso 3 July and Sanas Cormaic Y §179) represents phonetic spelling for dá n-ó pill ‘two ears of a horse’, and was mistakenly associated with OIr. bill, bell by early Irish glossators.
2747.
Russell (Paul): Laws, glossaries and legal glossaries in early Ireland.
In ZCP 51 (1999), pp. 85–115.
Considers the legal material attested in early Irish glossaries, and studies in particular the citations from Senchas már and Bretha nemed extant in Cormac’s Glossary, arguing that groups of glossae collectae extracted from the manuscripts containing these texts intervened in its compilation.
14037.
Russell (Paul): Fern do frestol na .u. consaine: perceptions of sound laws, sound change, and linguistic borrowing among the medieval Irish.
In Laws and rules in Indo-European (2012), pp. 17–30.
Particularly on the correspondence between Irish f- and Latin u-/v-, as expounded in Corm. Y §576 and §606.
3048.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Les gloses celtiques aux commentaires de Virgile.
In ÉtC 23 (1986), pp. 81–128.
1. ECLOGA dans le Glossaire de Cormac [gloss. elada]. 3. Les gloses irlandaises à Philargyrius [Explanatio A and B (cf. Thes. II, pp. 46-48 and 360-363), edited from MSS Paris, BNF Latin 11308 and Latin 7960, and MS Firenze, Laurentian Pluteus 45, 14; with commentary].

Addendum in ÉtC 24 (1987), pp. 327-328.

16341.
Pettit (Edward): Three variations on the theme of the dog-headed spear in medieval Irish: Celtchar’s lúin, Conall Cernach’s Derg Drúchtach, Lugaid’s flesc.
In StH 42 (2016), pp. 65–96.
5351.
Williams (Éimear): Bealtaine and Imbolg (oimelc) in Cormac’s Glossary.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 123–143.
Examines the definitions of bel, belltaine and oimelc in Cormac’s Glossary and criticises the received assumptions concerning the festivals of Beltaine and Imbolg which derive from a wrong interpretation of these particular glosses.
7454.
Rodway (Simon): Two notes on Sanas Cormaic.
In SC 7 (2008–2009), pp. 177–189.
7310.
De Jong (Frida), Draak (Maartje): De lastige schare; gevolgd door vijf anekdoten over dichtergeleerden; vertaald uit het middeleeuws Iers en van toelichting voorzien door M[aartje] D[raak] en F[rida] de J[ong].
Amsterdam: Meulenhoff, 1990. 118 pp.
(Meulenhoff editie, 1106).

Dutch translations with annotations of Tromdámh Guaire (Best2 1246); Mug Éme, Lethech and Gaire from Sanas Cormaic; the introductory part of Immacallam in dá thuarad (§§ I-IX as ed. by W. Stokes, in RC 26 (1905), pp. 4-64); Yellow Book of Lecan, col. 800, inc. Eochaid Rígéiges ardfili na Herend (as ed. by E. Knott, in Ériu 8 (1916), pp. 156-157).

8933.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Further to the drink of death.
In Éigse 37 (2010), pp. 134–141.
On lathirt (Corm. LB 27.8-9). Proposes that in this version of ‘Cormac’s glossary’ the lemma was reinterpreted as either ‘milk of death’ (laith irt) or ‘death of a warrior’ (láithirt).
5358.
Russell (Paul): Welsh *Cynnwgl and related matters.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 181–188.
OIr. (Cormac’s Glossary) ceinticul, cennticul, etc.
9797.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): The prull narrative in Sanas Cormaic.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 163–177.
Argues for an ambiguous sense of mac in the half-quatrain in the Prull narrative (ed. R. Thurneysen, v. Best2 1308).
8658.
Driessen (C. Michiel), Wiel (Caroline aan de): British *sʉ̄ðiklo- and *kentunklo-, two loans from Latin.
In StC 37 (2003), pp. 17–34.
Also on OIr. ceinticul (Corm. Y 239).
3386.
Russell (Paul): Graece …Latine: Graeco-Latin glossaries in early medieval Ireland.
In Peritia 14 (2000), pp. 406–420.
Investigates the sources of Greek material in Irish vernacular glossaries (particularly Sanas Cormaic).
10995.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Glossary entries on anart ‘a shroud’, the drink of death and the conjunction dath ‘because’.
In SGS 24 (2008), pp. 39–51.
On the anart entries in Sanas Cormaic (Corm. Y §37) and Dúil Dromma Cetta (CIH ii 605.15), focusing on the meaning of the citation dath don dich irt, which is interpreted as ‘because death comes’. In Appendix discusses two further instances of conjunction dath ‘because’ from Dúil Dromma Cetta.

Sancti Rumoldi acta

2006.
Breatnach (Pádraig A.): An Irish Bollandus: Fr Hugh Ward and the Louvain hagiographical enterprise.
In Éigse 31 (1999), pp. 1–30.
Reappraisal of the work of Irish hagiologist in Louvain Fr Hugh Ward. Includes a facsimile of MS Brussels 5095-96 f. 1r (containing Ward’s signature).

Sayers, Peig (1873–1958)

2670.
McGonagle (Noel), Wagner (Heinrich): Phonetische Texte aus Dunquin, County Kerry (Punkt 20 des Linguistic atlas and survey of Irish dialects).
In ZCP 42 (1987), pp. 219–241.
Contains 15 texts with phonetic transcription recorded in situ from storytellers Peig Sayers and Máire Ruiséal. Complements Oral literature from Dunquin, County Kerry, ed. by H. Wagner and N. Mac Congail, Belfast 1983.

Continues in ZCP 44 (1991), 200-235.

Scáthán shacramuinte na haithridhe (Mac Aingil)

1712.
de Brún (Pádraig): Two additions to the Franciscan collection.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 379–384.
Description of Franciscan MSS A 59 (containing tales and other materials) and A 60 (containing Sgáthán Shacramainte na hAithrighe).
1719.
Williams (N. J. A.): A note on Scáthán shacramuinte na haithridhe.
In Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh 1978–1979), p. 436.
Illustrates that Aodh Mac Aingil probably knew about and used archbishop William Daniel’s translation (dated to 1602 or 1603) of the New Testament into Irish.
1782.
Ó Fachtna (Anselm): Varia.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 373–378.
I. An tráchtas ar Teampoll Mhuire Loreto in Teagasg Críosdaidhe Uí Eodhasa; II. An t-aithríoch ríoga (ad P. Ó Súilleabháin, An t-aithríoch ríoga [BILL 2794]); III. Nóta eile ar Scáthán Shacramuinte na hAithridhe (ad N. J. A. Williams, in Éigse 17 (1979), p. 436); IV. Pointí éagsúla as Párliament na mBan (ad B. Ó Cuív, Párliament na mBan [BILL 2793]).
3418.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Three notes: 3. Inflexion of the objective predicative adjective.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 4–5.
ad Aodh Mac Aingil’s Scáthán shacramuinte na haithridhe line 4940 (as ed. by C. Ó Maonaigh 1952; see BILL 8150). Argues that in do-gheibh aibche iomchuibhghe sinn the adjectives are not plural forms, but rather spellings, after phonological convergence, for singular (classical and older) do-gheibh abaigh iomchubhaidh sinn.
5869.
Mac Craith (Mícheál): Scáthán shacramuinte na haithridhe: scáthán na sacraiminte céanna.
In LCC 30 (2000), pp. 28–64.
6328.
O’Reilly (Mary): Seventeenth-century Irish catechisms: European or not?
In ArH 50 (1996), pp. 102–112.
7430.
Ó Dúshláine (Tadhg): Athléamh ar Aodh Mac Aingil.
In IMN (1975–1976), pp. 9–25.
Identifies the characteristic features of European Baroque literary style in Scáthán shacramuinte na haithridhe.
7505.
Mac Craith (Mícheál): Scáthán shacramuinte na haithridhe: saothar reiligiúnda nó saothar polaitíochta?
In IMN (1993), pp. 144–154.
14471.
Ó Dúshláine (Tadhg): An Eoraip agus litríocht na Gaeilge, 1600-1650: gnéithe den Bharócachas Eorpach i litríocht na Gaeilge.
LT, 55. Baile Átha Cliath: An Clóchomhar, 1987. 234 pp.
Investigates contemporary continental influence on 17th-c. Irish literature. Includes a literary analysis of Keating’s Trí biorghaoithe an bháis (chap. 2) and Mac Aingil’s Scáthán shacramuinte na haithridhe (chap. 3).
18543.
Ó Dúshláine (Tadhg): Beannacht ar Nama Éireann: Scáthán Mhic Aingil mar leigheas ANAMA nó ceannaireacht nó langaracht? Féach sa scáthán.
In Súgán an dúchais (2018), pp. 57–68.

Scél ar Chairbre Cinn Cait

3187.
O’Connor (Ralph): Searching for the moral in Bruiden Meic Da Réo.
In Ériu 56 (2006), pp. 117–143.
Discusses the textual relationship of the various versions of the story concerning the revolt by the aithechthuatha (or ‘vassal peoples’), and analyses the recension known as Bruiden Meic Da Réo (providing comparisons with the alternative recension Scél ar Chairbre Cinn Cait throughout), offering an interpretation of this narrative as a developed exemplum principis in which the conflicting elements of the kingship ideology are scrutinized.

Scél asa mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán

634.
Carey (John): On the interrelationships of some Cín Dromma Snechtai texts.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 71–92.
1. The Mongán tales (Argues that all four tales are are the work of a single author: (a) Scél asa mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán; (b) Tucait Baile Mongáin; (c) Compert Mongáín; (d) Scél Mongáin); 2. Tucait Baile Mongáin and Baile Chuinn Chétchathaig [and Baile in Scáil] (Concludes that TBM and Scél asa mberar represent texts in which southern traditions are appropriated by a northern author ); 3. The Imacallam texts, Immram Brain, and the Mongán tales (Immacallam Choluim Chille 7 ind Óclaig and Immacallam in Druad Brain 7 inna Banḟátho Febuil); 4. Echtrae Chonlai and Immram Brain; 5. ‘The Midland group’ (Claims these date from the reign of Fínnechta Fledach mac Dúnchada, perhaps from the years 688-9); 6. Tochmarc Étaíne.
2235.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A Connacht medieval literary heritage: texts derived from Cín Dromma Snechtai through Leabhar na hUidhre.
In CMCS 16 (Winter 1988), pp. 1–40.
Argues that LU stands closer to the original Cín Dromma Snechtai texts than MSS Egerton 88 and Dublin, RIA 23 N 10, as it was the direct source of Gilla Commáin Ó Congaláin’s (†1135) selection whence the Connacht MS tradition comes.
2978.
White (Nora): Compert Mongáin and three other early Mongán tales: a critical edition with introduction, translation, textual notes, bibliography and vocabulary.
MMIT, 5. Maynooth: Department of Old and Middle Irish, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, 2006. iv + 227 pp.
Also incl. Scél as-a:mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán, Scél Mongáin and Tucait baile Mongáin.

Scel Choirpri Chruim 7 Móelsechlaind meic Móelrúanaid

12206.
Wiley (Dan M.): A medieval Irish ghost story.
In ZCP 60 (2013), pp. 239–274.
A discussion of the Middle Irish narrative entitled Scél Choirpri Chruim 7 Móelsechlaind meic Móelrúanaid. In Appendix: an edition of the first recension, beg. Epscop úasal ro-buí hi Clúain meic Nóis), based on RIA 23 P 16 with variants from Egerton 92 and Brussels 5100–04; with English translation and notes.

Scel Coirpre Chruim 7 Moel Sechnaill meic Moel Ruanaid

14598.
Carey (John): The story of Cairpre Cromm and Mael Ṡechnaill son of Mael Ruanaid.
In End and beyond (2014), pp. 465–473.
Edition of a tale entitled Scel Coirpre Chruim 7 Moel Sechnaill meic Moel Ruanaid. Text from Egerton 92 with missing text supplied from An Leabhar Breac; with English translation.

Scél Mongáin

634.
Carey (John): On the interrelationships of some Cín Dromma Snechtai texts.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 71–92.
1. The Mongán tales (Argues that all four tales are are the work of a single author: (a) Scél asa mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán; (b) Tucait Baile Mongáin; (c) Compert Mongáín; (d) Scél Mongáin); 2. Tucait Baile Mongáin and Baile Chuinn Chétchathaig [and Baile in Scáil] (Concludes that TBM and Scél asa mberar represent texts in which southern traditions are appropriated by a northern author ); 3. The Imacallam texts, Immram Brain, and the Mongán tales (Immacallam Choluim Chille 7 ind Óclaig and Immacallam in Druad Brain 7 inna Banḟátho Febuil); 4. Echtrae Chonlai and Immram Brain; 5. ‘The Midland group’ (Claims these date from the reign of Fínnechta Fledach mac Dúnchada, perhaps from the years 688-9); 6. Tochmarc Étaíne.
2978.
White (Nora): Compert Mongáin and three other early Mongán tales: a critical edition with introduction, translation, textual notes, bibliography and vocabulary.
MMIT, 5. Maynooth: Department of Old and Middle Irish, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, 2006. iv + 227 pp.
Also incl. Scél as-a:mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán, Scél Mongáin and Tucait baile Mongáin.

Scél na Fír Flatha

1942.
Carey (John): The testimony of the dead.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 1–12.
Legal interpretation of the episode of Cormac’s sword in Scél na Fír Flatha (= IT 3/1, 183–229).

App. (a) contains Cert Claidib Chormaic, from TCD MS H 2. 15B with variant readings from Scél na Fír Flatha (cf. supra) 201-202 and O’Davoren’s glossary (W. Stokes 1903-1904 [Best1, p. 7]) and English translation. App. (b) contains Gúbretha Caratniad §46, from MS Rawlinson B 502, with English translation. App. (c) contains commentary to Findṡruth Fíthail from TCD MS H 5. 15 (= CIH vi 2143.18-40, with corrections to D. A. Binchy's text), with English translation.

Scél na Fír Flatha 7 Echtra Cormaic a Tír Tharrṅgiri 7 Claideb Cormaic

1942.
Carey (John): The testimony of the dead.
In Éigse 26 (1992), pp. 1–12.
Legal interpretation of the episode of Cormac’s sword in Scél na Fír Flatha (= IT 3/1, 183–229).

App. (a) contains Cert Claidib Chormaic, from TCD MS H 2. 15B with variant readings from Scél na Fír Flatha (cf. supra) 201-202 and O’Davoren’s glossary (W. Stokes 1903-1904 [Best1, p. 7]) and English translation. App. (b) contains Gúbretha Caratniad §46, from MS Rawlinson B 502, with English translation. App. (c) contains commentary to Findṡruth Fíthail from TCD MS H 5. 15 (= CIH vi 2143.18-40, with corrections to D. A. Binchy's text), with English translation.

Scél saltrach na rann

1846.
Carey (John): A tract on the Creation.
In Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 1–9.
Entitled De operibus Dei; edited from Egerton 92, Egerton 1782 and Harley 432, with apparatus criticus and translation.
11037.
Mathis (Kate Louise): Gaelic gemina opera: the verse and prose texts of Saltair na rann and Scél saltrach na rann.
In SGS 28 (2011), pp. 1–20.
Explores the hypothesis that Scél saltrach na rann and Saltair na rann should be regarded as a medieval Irish example of opus geminatum (a work consisting of twinned prose and verse texts).

Scél Tuáin meic Chairill al. Immacallam Tuáin fri Finnio

828.
Carey (John): Scél Tuáin meic Chairill.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 93–111.
Edited from MSS RIA 23 E 25 (Lebor na hUidre), RIA 23 E 29 (Book of Fermoy), TCD H 3. 18, Laud Misc. 610, and Rawlinson B 512. With translation and notes.
1791.
Carey (John): Suibne Geilt and Tuán mac Cairill.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 93–105.
17047.
Nic Cárthaigh (Emma): Surviving the flood: revenants and antediluvian lore in medieval Irish texts.
In Transmission and transformation in the Middle Ages (2007), pp. 40–64.
Analyses characters in early Irish literature who embody the theme of transmission and transformation through surviving as repositories of antediluvian lore in the form of shape-shifters and mythic visionaries (exemplified by Tuán mac Cairill and Fintan mac Bóchra).

Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin

351.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The theme of ainmne in Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin.
In Celtica 15 (1983), pp. 78–87.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 342-351.
780.
Ó Coileáin (Seán): Some problems of story and history.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 115–136.
The relationship of story to history as exemplified in a number of texts relating to Guaire Aidni: [1.] Introduction; [2.] Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin; [3.] The question of Dínertach.
12319.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Inis Moccu Chéin.
In SGS 12/2 (Autumn 1976), pp. 267–270.
Is identified with Raasay.
10998.
Breeze (Andrew): Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin, Fiachna son of Báitán and Bamburgh.
In SGS 24 (2008), pp. 87–95.
ad ll. 482-485–3 (ed. D. A. Binchy, 1963); on the place-name Inber in Ríg.
2169.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The rhetoric of Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [Fs. Carney] (1989), pp. 233–250.
A commentary of the tale, focusing on lines 1-149 (as ed. by D. A. Binchy, 1963).

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 352-375.

Scéla Conchobuir meic Nessa

2798.
Edel (Doris): Caught between history and myth? The figures of Fergus and Medb in the Táin bó Cúailnge and related matter.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 143–169.
Studies the evolution of the figures of Medb and Fergus through the various stages of revision of the Táin, focusing on the progressive marginalization in the narrative of their love triangle with Ailill.

Addendum in ZCP 51 (1999), p. 211.
16674.
Mikhailova (T.): Саги об уладах [Sagi ob uladakh].
Москва [Moskva]: Аграф [Agraf], 2004. 640 pp.
[(In Russian:) Sagas from Ulster.]

Contains Russian transls. of: Noínden Ulad; Compert Conchobuir; Scéla Conchobuir meic Nessa; Longes mac nUislenn; Talland Étair; Tochmarc Lúaine ocus aided Athairne; Compert Con Culainn; Tochmarc Emire; Mesca Ulad; Fled Bricrenn; Serglige Con Culainn ocus óenét Emire; Aided Óenḟir Aífe; Echtra Nerai; De chophur in dá muccida; Aislinge Óenguso; Táin bó Dartada; Táin bó Flidais; Táin bó Regamain; Táin bó Regamna; Táin bó Fraích; Táin bó Cúailnge; Aided Derbḟorgaill; Aided Chon Culainn (A); Scéla mucce Meic Dathó; Bruiden Da Choca; Aided Fergusa meic Róich; Aided Lóegaire Búadaig; Aided Chon Roí; Aided Cheltchair maic Uithechair; Aided Chonchobair; Aided Ailella ocus Chonaill Chernaig; Aided Cheit meic Mágach; Aided Meidbe; Síaburcharpat Con Culainn.

Scéla Éogain 7 Cormaic

8064.
O Daly (Máirín) (ed.): Cath Maige Mucrama. The Battle of Mag Mucrama / edited by Máirín O Daly.
ITS, 50. London: Irish Texts Society, 1975. viii + 157 pp.
[1.] Cath Maige Mucrama, from LL; [2.] Scéla Éogain, from Laud Misc. 610; [3.] Scéla Moṡauluim, from Laud Misc. 610; [4.] Cath Cinn Abrad from Lecan. With English translation and notes. Appendix: Text of Cath Maige Mucrama from NLI G 7.

Rev. by
J. E. Caerwyn Williams, in StC 14-15 (1979-1980), pp. 451-455.
7311.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The heroic biography of Cormac mac Airt.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1977. xiii + 138 pp.
I. The heroic biography; II. Cormac mac Airt; III. Scéla Éogain 7 Cormaic [critical edition based on Laud Misc. 610 with readings from TCD H 3. 17; normalized text, with English translation and notes].

Rev. by
Édouard Bachellery, in ÉtC 21 (1984), pp. 360-361.
Patrick K. Ford, in Speculum 54/4 (Oct., 1979), pp 836-839.
Pádraig Ó Riain, in Éigse 17/4 (Geimhreadh, 1978-1979), p. 557-562.
J. E. Caerwyn Williams, in StC 14-15 (1979-1980), pp. 451-455.
14800.
McManus (Damian): Cormac mac Airt in classical Irish poetry: young in age but old in wisdom, and not entirely flawless.
In Ollam [Fs. Ó Cathasaigh] (2016), pp. 117–139.
On the reception of Cormac’s heroic biography in Irish classical poetry.
14801.
Hillers (Barbara): “Bhí an saol aoibhinn ait” : Cormac mac Airt in oral folk tradition.
In Ollam [Fs. Ó Cathasaigh] (2016), pp. 141–159.

Scéla lái brátha

1541.
Dumville (David N.): Scéla lái brátha and the collation of Leabhar na hUidhre.
In Éigse 16/1 (Samhradh 1975), pp. 24–28.
On the missing folio y.
11682.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Deilbhíocht Scéla laí brátha agus scríobhaithe LU.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 277–315.
In Aguisín: Córas briathartha Scéla laí brátha.
8670.
Boyle (Elizabeth): Eschatological justice in Scéla laí brátha.
In CMCS 59 (Summer 2010), pp. 39–54.
14028.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): The Middle Irish homily Scéla laí brátha.
In Apocrypha 20 (2009), pp. 83–114.

Scéla Moṡauluim

16528.
Downey (Clodagh): Who was Ailill Moṡaulum?
In Celtica 29 (2017), pp. 38–54.
Suggests the possibility of a Ciarraige origin for Moṡaulum, Ailill (Áulomm)'s alias in Scéla Moṡauluim.

Scéla Moṡauluim 7 Maic Con 7 Luigdech

2767.
Murray (Kevin): A reading from Scéla Moṡauluim.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 198–201.
ad lines 686-693 (as ed. by Maureen O Daly, 1975). Argues that tigernmas is to be taken as a proper name.
8064.
O Daly (Máirín) (ed.): Cath Maige Mucrama. The Battle of Mag Mucrama / edited by Máirín O Daly.
ITS, 50. London: Irish Texts Society, 1975. viii + 157 pp.
[1.] Cath Maige Mucrama, from LL; [2.] Scéla Éogain, from Laud Misc. 610; [3.] Scéla Moṡauluim, from Laud Misc. 610; [4.] Cath Cinn Abrad from Lecan. With English translation and notes. Appendix: Text of Cath Maige Mucrama from NLI G 7.

Rev. by
J. E. Caerwyn Williams, in StC 14-15 (1979-1980), pp. 451-455.
12215.
Arbuthnot (Sharon J.): Finn, Ferchess and the rincne: versions compared.
In The Gaelic Finn tradition (2012), pp. 62–80.
Explains the reference to number five in the entry on rincne in Cormac’s glossary (Corm. Y 1084).

Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó

4842.
Buttimer (Cornelius G.): Scéla mucce meic Dathó: a reappraisal.
In PHCC 2 (1982), pp. 61–73.
Includes comparison with Talland Étair.
18379.
Hicks (Ronald): The rout of Ailill and Medb: myth on the landscape.
In Emania 24 (2018), pp. 19–34.
Analyses the itinerary of retreat described in Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó §§19-20 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1935): Mag Ailbe, Roiriu, Áth Midbine, Maistiu, Druim Criaig, Ráith Imgain, Fid nGaible, Áth mac Lúgnai, Druim Dá Maige, Áth Chind Chon.
1086.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): The early modern version of Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó: tempus, locus, persona et causa scribendi.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 37–60.
1. The manuscripts; 2. Relationship of [MSS] P [RIA 24 P 12], G [NLI G 448] and H [TCD 1412 (H 6.8)]; 3. Scribes and MSS; 4. Possible date and scribe of P [wr. between 1638 and 1648 by Giolla Pádraig Ó Luinín]; 5. Rawlinson B 512 and the Early Modern version; 6. Additional topographical material; 7. Purpose of additional topographical material; 8. The significance of the Conall Cearnach episode; 9. The significance of further changes in the Early Modern version; 10. The relevance of the Early Modern version [tale reworked between 1567-90, and was written for the MacDonnells of Antrim to justify the murder of Seaán Ó Néill (1567) by the MacDonnells]; 11. The redactor of the Early Modern version [a member of the Ó Duibhgeannáin family or Brian Ó Gnímh]. App.: The Edinburgh version (E [NLS Advocates’ Library 72.1.36]) of SMMD. Cf. C. Breatnach, in Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 119-138; 43 (1992), pp. 159-176.
18480.
Sheehan (Sarah): Losing face: heroic discourse and inscription in flesh in Scéla Mucce Meic Dathó.
In The ends of the body (2013), pp. 132–135.
1416.
Poppe (Erich): Varia: II. King Ahab, Boia, Mac Da Thó and Ailill.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 169–171.
The beginning of the biblical story of Ahab and Jezebel concerning wives’ advice (1 Kings, 21.4-5) served as a model in Wales and in Ireland (e.g. Scéla muicce Meic Da Thó, Fled Bricrenn).
3739.
McCone (Kim): Die Spottwettkämpfe in der Geschichte von Mac Da Thós Schwein.
In KF 1 (2006), pp. 149–161.
Argues that Scéla mucce meic Dathó is an elaborated, Christian-oriented satire composed in a monastic milieu, whose author makes use of the boasting contest with the aim of ridiculising the warlike lifestyle of Early Ireland. Furthermore argues that Cú Chulainn is the unnamed subject of a parody at the anticlimatic end of the narrative.
3768.
Quin (E. G.): Textual notes: [3] Scéla mucce Meic Dathó.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 95–97.
ad R. Thurneysen 1935 (Best2 1134).
3805.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 4. On Scéla mucce Meic Dathó §16, 9 f.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 167.
nad ·fil for nand ·fil.
740.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 1. Old Irish ar-neget.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 164–167.
ad J. H. W. Penny, Varia: III. Weak and Strong i-verbs in Old Irish, in Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 149-154.
4314.
Gleasure (James W.): The Rawlinson B 512 version of Scéla mucce Meic Dathó revisited.
In SGS 17 (1996), pp. 143–145.
Additional corrections to SMMD2 (cf. Robert T. Meyer, in Trivium 1 (1966), pp. 183-184 [BILL 4964].
4592.
Corthals (Johan) (trans.): Altirische Erzählkunst.
ForCelt, 1. Hamburg: Lit, 1996. 96 pp.
Contains German transls. of Orgain Denna Ríg, Tochmarc Étaíne, Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó, Aided Crimthainn meic Fhidaig, Tochmarc Becfhola, Síaburcharpat Con Culainn, Immram Snédgusa ocus maic Ríagla, Acallam na senórach (excerpt).

2nd rev. ed., North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2016.

Rev. by
Helen Imhoff, in Celtica 30 (2018), pp. 217-222 (2nd ed.).
5779.
McCone (K. R.): Scéla muicce Meicc Da Thó.
In LCC 14 (1983), pp. 5–38.
8160.
Sayers (William): Serial defamation in two medieval tales: the Icelandic Ölkofra Þáttr and the Irish Scéla mucce Meic Datho.
In OT 6/1 (1991), pp. 35–57.
Compares the flyting passages in the two narratives.
8291.
Sayers (William): Conall’s welcome to Cet in Scéla mucce Meic Dathó.
In Florilegium 4 (1982), pp. 100–108.
Read fer menoc in §15, 16-20 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1935).
8937.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): Historical context and literary meaning: another reading of Scéla muicce Meic Da Thó.
In JCS 5 (2005), pp. 1–16.
8943.
Boll (Sheila): Structural symmetry and the representation of kinship in mediaeval Gaelic narrative literature: Cath Maige Mucrama and Scéla muicce Meic Dáthó.
In JCS 5 (2005), pp. 127–139.
4619.
Gantz (Jeffrey) (trans.): Early Irish myths and sagas / translated with an introduction and notes by Jeffrey Gantz.
Penguin Classics. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1981. vi + 280 pp.
Contains: The wooing of Étaín; The destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel; The dream of Óengus; The cattle raid of Fróech; The labour pains of the Ulaid & the twins of Macha; The birth of Cú Chulaind; The boyhood deeds of Cú Chulaind; The death of Aífe’s only son; The wasting sickness of Cú Chulaind & the only jealousy of Emer; The tale of Macc Da Thó's pig; The intoxication of the Ulaid; Bricriu’s feast; The exile of the sons of Uisliu.
16674.
Mikhailova (T.): Саги об уладах [Sagi ob uladakh].
Москва [Moskva]: Аграф [Agraf], 2004. 640 pp.
[(In Russian:) Sagas from Ulster.]

Contains Russian transls. of: Noínden Ulad; Compert Conchobuir; Scéla Conchobuir meic Nessa; Longes mac nUislenn; Talland Étair; Tochmarc Lúaine ocus aided Athairne; Compert Con Culainn; Tochmarc Emire; Mesca Ulad; Fled Bricrenn; Serglige Con Culainn ocus óenét Emire; Aided Óenḟir Aífe; Echtra Nerai; De chophur in dá muccida; Aislinge Óenguso; Táin bó Dartada; Táin bó Flidais; Táin bó Regamain; Táin bó Regamna; Táin bó Fraích; Táin bó Cúailnge; Aided Derbḟorgaill; Aided Chon Culainn (A); Scéla mucce Meic Dathó; Bruiden Da Choca; Aided Fergusa meic Róich; Aided Lóegaire Búadaig; Aided Chon Roí; Aided Cheltchair maic Uithechair; Aided Chonchobair; Aided Ailella ocus Chonaill Chernaig; Aided Cheit meic Mágach; Aided Meidbe; Síaburcharpat Con Culainn.

Scéla na esérgi

10807.
Boyle (Elizabeth): Neoplatonic thought in medieval Ireland: the evidence of Scéla na esérgi.
In Medium ævum 78/2 (2009), pp. 216–230.
With a study of the author’s philosophical vocabulary, focusing on the terms dliged, folud, aicned, umallóit, teorfegad.

Scéla Néill Ḟrossaig

2569.
Wiley (Dan M.): Niall Frossach’s true judgement.
In Ériu 55 (2005), pp. 19–36.
Argues that reddening (imdergad) and eruption of steam () are connected with an Irish hagiographical motif, and that their attribution to Niall is politically motivated.
5148.
McManus (Damian): Niall Frosach’s ‘act of truth’: a Bardic apologue in a poem for Sir Nicholas Walsh, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas (†1615).
In Ériu 58 (2008), pp. 133–168.
Labhram ar iongnaibh Éireann (43 qq.), attributed to Tuileagna Ó Maoil Chonaire. Text from RIA 23 L 17; with English translation and notes. Appendix I: Diplomatic edition of the two copies of the Middle Irish story of Niall Frosach’s judgement, from the Book of Leinster and the Liber flavus Fergusiorum. Appendix II: A shorter version of the same story from the Leabhar Eoghanach (Book of the O’Neills).
7671.
Greene (David): The ‘act of truth’ in a Middle Irish story.
In Saga och Sed (1976), pp. 30–37.
English translation from LL 35670-35710.
11684.
McManus (Damian): Naomhú Néill Fhrosaigh Uí Néill.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 347–378.
Examines literature concerning Niall Frossach, arguing that his depiction as an exemplary, peaceful and pious ruler who had a special sympathy with God and the church is the result of a deliberate process of ‘sanctification’.

Sciathlúireach Mhuire

10440.
Ó Madagáin (Breandán): Ceol a chanadh Eoghan Mór Ó Comhraí.
In Béaloideas 51 (1983), pp. 71–86.
Edition of a hymn entitled Sciathlúireach Mhuire, arguably taken down by George Petrie from the singing of O’Curry. Text based on RIA 23 C 20, with variants.

Scottish chronicle

12357.
Hudson (B. T.): Elech and the Scots in Strathclyde.
In SGS 15 (1988), pp. 145–149.
4336.
Hudson (Benjamin T.): The language of the Scottish Chronicle and its European context.
In SGS 18 (1998), pp. 57–73.
6656.
Cowan (Edward J.): The Scottish chronicle in the Poppleton manuscript.
In IR 32/1 (Spring 1981), pp. 3–21.
Paris, BNF, latin 4126.
13228.
Dumville (David N.): The chronicle of the kings of Alba.
In Kings, clerics and chronicles in Scotland [M. O. Anderson essays] (2000), pp. 73–86.
Discusses the Scottish chronicle in MS Paris, BNF, Latin 4126.
4484.
Miller (Molly): The last century of Pictish succession.
In ScS 23 (1979), pp. 39–67.

Scúap a Fánait

14608.
Fogarty (Hugh): The broom out of Fánat.
In End and beyond (2014), pp. 685–696.
From NLI G 10; diplomatic and normalized texts, with English translation and notes.
14610.
Carey (John): The lore of the fiery arrow.
In End and beyond (2014), pp. 705–713.
Text from RIA D iv 2 with variants from Leabhar Breac; with English translation. Includes a poem beg. A Dhe mhair, co n-agbainn mo dí erail (7 qq.), atributed to Moling (cf. Eugene O’Curry, Best1, p. 121 [Scuip a Fanat]).

Scúap chrábaid

8727.
O’Sullivan (Tomás): Texts and transmissions of the Scúap chrábaid: an Old-Irish litany in its manuscript context.
In SCF 7 (2010), pp. 26–47.
18677.
Ó Maidín (Uinseann): The Celtic monk: rules and writings of early Irish monks / translated and annotated by Uinseann Ó Maidín.
Kalamazoo, MI: , 1996. 215 pp. (Cistercian Studies series, 162).
Contains various rules and other texts in English translation. 1. Rules: The Rule of Ailbe; The Rule of Comgall; The Rule of Colum Cille; The Rule of Ciarán; The Rule of the Grey Monks; The Rule of Cormac Mac Cuilennáin; The Rule of Carthage; An incomplete fragment [= Cid is dech do clerech, from An Leabhar Breac 260b); The Rule of the Céli Dé; The Rule of Tallaght, or The teaching of Maelruain. 2. Writings, litanies and hymns: Testimony to the Monastery of Sinchell The Younger; The Homily of Cambrai Fragment; A treatise on The Eucharist; The Alphabet of Devotion [= Apgitir chrábaid]; Litany of the Trinity; Litany of Jesus Christ [= Scúap chrábaid]; Litany of Our Lady; Invocation of Saint Michael; Poems [Engl. transls. repr. from various sources]; Latin Hymns.

Rev. by
Réamonn Ó Muirí, in SAM 17/2 (1998), pp. 221-222.

Scurry, James al. Ó Scoireadh, Séamus (c. 1790–1828)

5623.
Laffan (Kathleen): James Scurry (1790-1828): a South Kilkenny scholar.
In Decies 50 (Autumn 1994), pp. 60–66.
15414.
Ua Cearnaigh (Barra): Amhail fuaim chogair bhig: teangeolas Shéamais Uí Scoireadh.
Dán agus tallann, 17. An Daingean: An Sagart, 2011. x + 403 pp.
Rev. by
Aodán Ó Duibh, in SAM 24/2 (2013), pp. 371-372.
Seán Ua Súilleabháin, in CMCS 66 (Winter, 2013), pp. 97-98.

Seacht mBua an Éirí Amach

1732.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Geilt sa chiall duine lomnocht.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 39–42.
Includes the paradigm of geilt in both Early and Modern Irish.

Seafarer, The

221.
Jacobs (Nicolas): The seafarer and the birds: a possible Irish parallel.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 125–131.
Makes some comparisons with two verse passages from Buile Suibhne.

Seán Bán

1526.
Ó hUrmoltaigh (Nollaig): Amhráin as Toraigh.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), pp. 224–234.
Seven songs (with phonetic transcription) recorded from Jimmy (Shéamais Bháin) Ó Mianáin, Tory Island: [1.] Pádraig 'ac Ruaidhrí beg. A Phádraig 'ic Ruaidhrí, is tú corp an duine uasail; [2.] Na Buachaillí in Albain beg. Mo bheannacht leis na buachaillí a d’imthigh uaim thar sáile; [3.] Conall Ó Baoighill beg. Tháinig an bás go fáilthidhe 'ugam ar cuairt; [4.] Brighid Óg Ní Mháille beg. A Bhrighid Óg Ní Mháille, is tú d’fhág mo chroidhe cráidhte; [5.] Seán Bán beg. Mo chosa, mo lámha, mo chnámha, is tá mé uilig tinn; [6.] Béal Buidhe Uaighe beg. Is iomdhaidh lasta préataí a thug mé féin is mo dhearbhráthair; [7.] Péarla an Bhrollaigh Ghil Bháin beg. Tharlaidh dom péarla an bhrollaigh ghil bháin.

Seán Gabha

1785.
Williams (N. J. A.): Seán Gabha.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 395–397.
Song beg. Ceist agam orraibh, a bhfuil i láthair, ed. from MS NLI G 251.

Séanadh Saighre

1795.
Harrison (Alan): Séanadh Saighre.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 136–148.
Edited from MS RIA D iv 2, with variant readings from MS RIA 23 O 48 (Liber flavus Fergusiorum) and UCD Add. Ir. MS 14 (Mac Firbisigh’s Book of Genealogies); with translation and notes.

Secht n-aisdir do-ghní an anuim tar éis an chuirp d’fhágbháil

1580.
Herbert (Máire): The seven journeys of the soul.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 1–11.
[1.] Poem beg. Cétna laithe tair[ir]aith by Moelmoedóc Ua Mongair, ed. from MS RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), with English translation and notes; [2.] Poem beg. Anum ó téid as a corp, ed. from Laud Misc. 615, with English translation and notes; [3.] Brief prose text beg. Secht n-aisdir do-ghní an anuim tar éis an chuirp d’fhágbháil, ed. from MS NLI G 1, with English translation. Includes an appendix with 4 additional interpolated stanzas from Laud.

Sechtae

4718.
McLaughlin (Roisin): Early Irish satire.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2008. xi + 300 pp.
Texts include: (chap. 2) An Old Irish tract on satire [beg. Cis lir fodlai aíre, reconstructed from Book of Ballymote, Book of Uí Maine and NLS Gaelic 1; with English translation, manuscript readings and notes, and including the text of a shorter version found in TCD H 3. 18]; (chap. 3) The Old Irish heptad on satire [no. 33, beg. A-táat secht cenéla aíre le Féniu; restored text based on Rawl. B 487 and TCD H 3. 18, followed by diplomatic text of the glosses and commentary in Rawl. B 487; with English translation and notes]; (chap. 4) A miscellany of medieval Irish satires [an edition of the satires cited in Mittelirische Verslehren III (ed. by R. Thurneysen 1891 [Best1, p. 53]); 86 poems, normalized from the six extant witnesses, with linguistic and metrical analysis, manuscript readings, English translation and notes].

Rev. by
Johan Corthals, in Éigse 37 (2010), pp 174-178.
G. R. Isaac, in JGAHS 62 (2010), pp. 215-216.
Riita Latvio, in SCF 6 (2009), pp. 83-86.
Gerald Manning, in StH 36 (2009-2010), pp. 211-215.
Feargal Ó Béarra, in Béaloideas 77 (2009), pp. 132-134.
S. Ó D., in Clogher record 20/1 (2009), pp. 160-164.
Simon Rodway, in CMCS 62 (Winter, 2011), pp. 94-97.
Paul Russell, in ÉtC 38 (2012), pp. 324-326.
Robin Chapman Stacey, in Speculum 86/3 (Jul., 2011), pp. 785-786.

Second vision of Adamnán

14607.
Volmering (Nicole): The Second vision of Adamnán.
In End and beyond (2014), pp. 647–681.
Text based on Leabhar Breac with variants from Liber flavus Fergusiorum; with English translation and notes.

Secundinus, St.

11542.
Orchard (Andy): Audite omnes amantes: a hymn in Patrick’s praise.
In Saint Patrick 493-1993 (1993), pp. 153–173.
In Appendix: Text, translation, sources and parallels.
14918.
Herren (Michael W.): An early Irish precursor of the ‘Offiziendichtung’ of the Carolingian and Ottonian periods.
In Euphrosyne 22 (1994), pp. 291–300.
Repr. in Latin letters in early christian Ireland, nº VI.

Sedulius Scottus

2409.
Law (Vivien): Fragments from the lost portions of the Epitomae of Virgilius Maro Grammaticus.
In CMCS 21 (Summer 1991), pp. 113–125.
identified in the Florilegium Frisingense (MS München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6433) and Sedulius Scottus’ Collectaneum Miscellaneum.
3642.
Davies (Luned M.): Sedulius Scottus: Liber de Rectoribus Christianis, a Carolingian or Hibernian mirror for princes?
In StC 26–27 (1991–1992), pp. 34–50.
14985.
Herren (Michael W.): Sedulius Scottus and the knowledge of Greek.
18422.
Simpson (Dean): Sedulius Scottus and the Latin Classics.
In Crossed paths (1991), pp. 27–38.

Segneri, Paolo

6096.
Fennessy (Ignatius): Some Cork subscribers conned in 1795?
In JCHAS 111 (2006), pp. 51–58.
On the production and publication of the bilingual True wisdom/Eagna fhirinneach, by P. Segnary (Cork 1795).

Select Irish poems translated into English (1782)

6538.
Mac Craith (Mícheál): Charles Wilson (c. 1756-1808): réamhtheachtaí Charlotte Brooke.
In ECI 17 (2002), pp. 57–78.

Sénadh Saigri

12690.
Harrison (Alan): Athchuairt ar Shéanadh Saighre.
In Téada dúchais (2002), pp. 59–70.

Senán, abbot of Inis Cathaig

2154.
Breatnach (Liam): An edition of Amra Senáin.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [Fs. Carney] (1989), pp. 7–31.
Suggested authorship: Cormac mac Cuilennáin (†908). Text from MS Dublin RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), and reconstructed text. First line Senán soer sídathair. With English translation, notes and metrical analysis.

Senchán Torpéist

2403.
Ford (Patrick K.): The blind, the dumb and the ugly: aspects of poets and their craft in early Ireland and Wales.
In CMCS 19 (Summer 1990), pp. 27–40.
Expands on J. F. Nagy's discussion (in The wisdom of the outlaw: the boyhood deeds of Finn in Gaelic tradition, Berkeley 1985) of the marginal fili and examines in detail two Irish narratives concerning Amairgen, son of Ecet Salach and Senchán Torpéist.
13831.
Campanile (Enrico) (ed.): Find, Taulcha –tuath cuire–, Caīlte.
In Die älteste Hofdichtung von Leinster (1988), pp. 29–30 [8. Die Enkel von Baíscne].
Ascr. to Senchán Torpéist. With German translation.
13832.
Campanile (Enrico) (ed.): Tri maic Ruaid, ruirig flaind.
In Die älteste Hofdichtung von Leinster (1988), p. 30 [9. Die Söhne von Ross Ruad].
Ascr. to Senchán Torpéist. With German translation.

Senchas fagbála Caisil

3449.
Kelly (Fergus) (ed.): Audacht Morainn / edited by Fergus Kelly.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1976. xlv + 83 pp.
An Old Irish speculum principum. Critical edition, restored, of recension B from MSS RIA 23 N 10, Edinburgh Advocates’ Library 72.1.42, Egerton 88, and RIA 23 N 27; with English translation, notes and vocabulary; linguistic analysis. Appendix 1: conflation, with variant readings, of seven later versions; Appendix 2: passages used in a rosc in Senchas fagbála Caisil (cf BILL 5108).

Rev. by
Édouard Bachellery, in ÉtC 15 (1976-1978), pp. 358-360.
P. L. Henry, in StH 17-18 (1977-1978), pp. 203-210.
Pádraig Ó Riain, in Éigse 16/4 (Geimhreadh, 1976), pp. 345-348.
N. J. A. Williams, in StC 12-13 (1977-1978), pp. 467-470.
12764.
Stone (Brian J.): Rhetorical re-tellings: Senchas fagbála Caisil and twelfth-century church reform in Ireland.
In Quaestio insularis 12 (2011), pp. 109–125.
On the context of the version of this tale found in Acallam na senórach.

Senchas már

613.
Breatnach (Liam): On the original extent of the Senchas Már.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 1–43.
Discusses texts belonging to SM, the tripartite division of the collection; proposes original order of texts and provides a brief discussion of the titles and contents of 47 individual tracts.
1160.
Scowcroft (R. Mark): Recht fáide and its gloss in the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchus már.
In Ériu 53 (2003), pp. 143–150.
ad §7.4-8 (as ed. by. J. Carey, in Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 1-32); discusses the term recht fáide ‘the law of prophets’, and concludes that the story of the origins of Senchus már implicitly compares native Irish learning with traditional divisions of the Old Testament as set forth by St. Jerome and Isidore of Seville among others.
Carey (J.) (ref.)
1256.
Carey (John): An edition of the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas Már.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 1–32.
Edition, with translation and notes, from TCD H 3. 18, H 3. 17, Harley 432, and Lebor na hUidre. Appendix 1 contains an edition from MS TCD H 3. 17 of a passage concerning Dubthach’s judgement (with translation and notes); Appendix 2 contains an edition from MS Harley 432 of the retelling of a story concerning the killing of Patrick’s charioteer, Odrán (with translation and notes). Cf. J. Carey, in CMCS 19 (Summer, 1990), pp. 1-18.
2401.
Carey (John): The two laws in Dubthach’s judgment.
In CMCS 19 (Summer 1990), pp. 1–18.
Discusses the terms recht litre and recht aicnid as used in the ‘pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már' and interprets the episode as an allegory of the transition from pagan to Christian in Irish culture. Criticises K. McCone, in Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 1-35.
3797.
Murray (Kevin): Catṡlechta and other medieval legal material relating to cats.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 143–159.
Edits and translates the surviving fragments of cat law from the Senchas már and elsewhere.
2747.
Russell (Paul): Laws, glossaries and legal glossaries in early Ireland.
In ZCP 51 (1999), pp. 85–115.
Considers the legal material attested in early Irish glossaries, and studies in particular the citations from Senchas már and Bretha nemed extant in Cormac’s Glossary, arguing that groups of glossae collectae extracted from the manuscripts containing these texts intervened in its compilation.
4900.
Patterson (Nerys): The O’Doran legal family and the sixteenth-century recensions of the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas Már.
In PHCC 6 (1986), pp. 131–149.
Emphasises the role of the O’Doran legal family in the transmission of the Prologue on the grounds of their association with the main text in MS Harley 432.
3547.
Binchy (D. A.): The pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már.
In StC 10–11 (1975–1976), pp. 15–28.
Specially on the interrelationship of the three extant recensions.
3228.
McCone (Kim): Dubthach maccu Lugair and a matter of life and death in the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 1–35.
Studies the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már, discussing in particular its literary background, its dating, and the relationship between Dubthach’s poem and the narrative framework which surrounds it. Includes an edition of the poem, reconstructed from Harley 432 (= CIH ii 340.28-341.23); with textual notes and English translation.
3423.
Bracken (Damian): Immortality and capital punishment: patristic concepts in Irish law.
In Peritia 9 (1995), pp. 167–186.
On the use of biblical theology in Dubthach’s poem to justify recourse to capital punishment.
10566.
Breatnach (Liam): The early Irish law text Senchas már and the question of its date.
Quiggin memorial lectures, 13. Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 2011. ii + 48 pp.
Includes an edition of the canonical text of the introductory tract to the Senchas már. Normalized from Harley 432, etc. (cf. R. Thurneysen, in ZCP 16 (1927), pp. 167-196 [6. Zu den bisherigen ausgaben der irischen Rechtstexte: i. Ancient laws of Ireland und Senchas mār]); with English translation and notes.

In appendix: text of SM 1. Introduction, from CIH ii 344.24-352.12, together with variant readings.
12214.
Hollo (Kaarina): ‘Finn and the man in the tree’ as a verbal icon.
In The Gaelic Finn tradition (2012), pp. 50–61.
Discusses the second part of the tale cited in the OIr. glossing on the Senchas már as an explanation for imbas forosnai (CIH iii 879.23-880.14), suggesting a possible Christian interpretation of the forest scene with Derg Corra and the latter’s recognition by Finn.
12364.
McLaughlin (Roisin): A second source for the text on judges and poets in the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már.
In Celtica 27 (2013), pp. 18–37.
Draws attention to a previously unpublished Middle Irish text on pre-Patrician judges and poets in UCD-OFM MS A 9 (transcription and translation provided), and compares it with a version in TCD MS H 3. 17.
16892.
Breatnach (Liam): The glossing of the early Irish law tracts.
In Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg (2016), pp. 113–132.
Examines the various types of glossing and commentary found in early Irish legal texts and discusses how these were read, interpreted and analysed, with particular attention to etymological glossing, the use of glosses in conjunction to the main text, and the compilation of digests.

Senchas na relec

15854.
Imhoff (Helen): The tradition of Art mac Cuind’s burial at Treóit (Trevet, Co. Meath).
In RíM 24 (2013), pp. 73–114.

Senchus fer nAlban

2063.
Dumville (David N.): Ireland and North Britain in the earlier Middle Ages: contexts for Míniugud senchusa fher nAlban.
In Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 1 (2002), pp. 185–212.
With a genealogical chart. Incl. ed. based on Bannerman’s own from MS TCD 1298 and commentary.
2065.
Bannerman (John): Studies in the history of Dalriada.
Edinburgh and London: Scottish Academic Press, 1974. x + 178 pp.
Edition and study of Senchus fer nAlban; text based on TCD MS H 2. 7, with variant readings from RIA MSS 23 P 12 (Book of Ballymote) and 23 P 2 (Book of Lecan). Incl. text from UCD Add. Ir. MS 14 (Mac Firbisigh’s Book of Genealogies). Cf. J. Bannerman 1966 (BILL 8863). Follows an account of the Convention of Druim Cett (575).

Rev. by
T. M. Charles-Edwards, in StH 15 (1975), pp. 194-196.
Donald Macaulay, in The Scottish historical review 58/1 (Apr., 1979), pp. 92-93.
Donnchadh Ó Corráin, in Celtica 13 (1980), pp. 169-182.
4353.
Dumville (David N.): Cethri prímchenéla Dáil Riata.
In SGS 20 (2000), pp. 170–191.
A discussion of this genealogical treatise; includes transcripts from the six extant manuscript witnesses.
13226.
Sharpe (Richard): The thriving of Dalriada.
4817.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Irish genealogical collections: the Scottish dimension.
In 10th ICCS, Edinburgh 1995 (1999), pp. 251–264.

Septuagint

1461.
O’Loughlin (Thomas): The Latin version of the Scriptures in Iona in the late seventh century: the evidence from Adomnán’s De Locis Sanctis.
In Peritia 8 (1994), pp. 18–26.
De Locis Sanctis provides no evidence for the presence of a text of the Vetus Latina or the Septuagint in the library of Iona in the last quarter of the seventh century; quotations from these texts may have been drawn from an intermediate source.

Serc Duibhe Lacha do Mhongán

1034.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): In defence of rómánsaíocht.
In Ériu 38 (1987), pp. 9–26.
Preliminary re-evaluation of origins, form and content of romantic tales. Discussion based on story of Serc Duibhe Lacha do Mhongán, known in scribal tradition as Tóruigheacht Duibhe Lacha Láimh-Ghile.

Serglige Con Culainn 7 óenét Emire

884.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia: IV. 2. A note on Serglige Con Culainn.
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 204–205.
Takes -da- as an infixed pronoun in conda rucus ‘and I brought him’; vs. M. Dillon, SCC line 677.
Dillon (M.) (ref.)
18384.
Findon (Joanne): Gender and power in Serglige Con Culainn and The only jealousy of Emer.
In Language and tradition in Ireland (2003), pp. 47–61.
1274.
Hollo (Kaarina): Cú Chulainn and Síd Truim.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 13–22.
[1.] Introduction: reference to Síd Truim in poem in Serglige Con Culainn; [2.] Síd Truim and the Tuatha Dé Danann; [3.] Síd Truim as the place of Cú Chulainn’s birth: in first version of tale Compert Con Culainn contained in MS RIA D iv 2 (1223); [4.] Síd Truim as the place of Cú Chulainn’s burial: in poem A Oisín fuirigh ar Dhia; [5.] The location of Síd Truim; [6.] Conclusions.
18388.
Findon (Joanne): A woman’s words: Emer and female speech in the Ulster cycle.
Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. 211 pp.
1992.
Carey (John): Eithne in Gubai.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 160–164.
Argues that the figure underlying Eithne in Gubai wife of Cú Chulainn in recension B of Serglige Con Chulainn is the goddess Bóand (also surfacing as Ben in Gobann associated with the Boyne tumuli).
18483.
Harbers (Marianne) (trans.), Draak (Maartje) (forw. auth.): De slopende slaap van Cú Chulainn / vertaling uit het Oud-Iers Marianne Harbers; voorwoord Prof. Maartje Draak.
Amsterdam: Tabula, 1983. 67 pp.
2722.
Salberg (Trond Kruke): The question of the main interpolation of H into M’s part of the Serglige Con Culainn in the Book of the Dun Cow and some related problems.
In ZCP 45 (1992), pp. 161–181.
Examines the interpolation at 48b11-49a16, and argues that the erased space could not have accommodated section x (48b12-49a5), thought by R. Thurneysen (in Best2 1030) to come from recension A, if written in M’s hand, therefore concluding with M. Dillon (in Best2 1138a) that x is from recension B.
5663.
Carey (John): The uses of tradition in Serglige Con Culainn.
In Ulidia 1 (1994), pp. 77–84.
Also on the status of the Briatharthecosc Con Culainn.
5664.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Reflections on Compert Conchobuir and Serglige Con Culainn.
In Ulidia 1 (1994), pp. 85–89.
Includes a discussion of the Briatharthecosc Con Culainn.

Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 271-279.
7904.
Enright (Michael J.): The warband context of the Unferth episode.
In Speculum 73 (1998), pp. 297–337.
3396.
Borsje (Jacqueline): Omens, ordeals and oracles: on demons and weapons in early Irish texts.
In Peritia 13 (1999), pp. 224–248.
Discusses the sword ritual described in Serglige Con Culainn §2.15-17, and argues that the background for the demons mentioned in this and other texts in connection with the delivery of an oracular message about fights in the past is to be found in the Irish war goddesses (particularly the Morrígan).
12230.
Findon (Joanne): Dangerous siren or abandoned wife? Gloss versus text on an early Irish manuscript page.
In Signs on the edge (2007), pp. 187–202.
On the marginal quatrain in LU p. 124, fn. a (first line: Mían mná Tethrach a tenid). In Appendix: Marginal poem, RIA MS 23 E 25, fo. 50 [text with English translation].
14908.
Egeler (Matthias): Vom Land der Frauen und keltischen Helden. Irische Erzählungen von den Inseln der Unsterblichkeit: Brans Seereise, Connles Fahrt in die Anderwelt und Cú Chulainns Krankenlager / übertragen und mit einem Nachwort von Matthias Egeler.
PTB, 11. Wien: Praesens, 2016. 106 pp. (Praesens TextBibliothek, 11).
Contains German transls. of Echtrae Chonnlai, Immram Brain maic Febuil, and Serglige Con Culainn. Epilogue: Keltischer Mythos und christliche Theologie in den Erzählungen vom Land der Frauen.
13541.
Fomin (Maxim): Paradigms of polity in Serglige Con Culainn.
In Ulidia 3 (2013), pp. 181–191.
4619.
Gantz (Jeffrey) (trans.): Early Irish myths and sagas / translated with an introduction and notes by Jeffrey Gantz.
Penguin Classics. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1981. vi + 280 pp.
Contains: The wooing of Étaín; The destruction of Da Derga’s Hostel; The dream of Óengus; The cattle raid of Fróech; The labour pains of the Ulaid & the twins of Macha; The birth of Cú Chulaind; The boyhood deeds of Cú Chulaind; The death of Aífe’s only son; The wasting sickness of Cú Chulaind & the only jealousy of Emer; The tale of Macc Da Thó's pig; The intoxication of the Ulaid; Bricriu’s feast; The exile of the sons of Uisliu.
10836.
Ní Bhrolcháin (Muireann): Serglige Con Culainn: a possible re-interpretation.
In Ulidia 2 (2009), pp. 344–355.
16674.
Mikhailova (T.): Саги об уладах [Sagi ob uladakh].
Москва [Moskva]: Аграф [Agraf], 2004. 640 pp.
[(In Russian:) Sagas from Ulster.]

Contains Russian transls. of: Noínden Ulad; Compert Conchobuir; Scéla Conchobuir meic Nessa; Longes mac nUislenn; Talland Étair; Tochmarc Lúaine ocus aided Athairne; Compert Con Culainn; Tochmarc Emire; Mesca Ulad; Fled Bricrenn; Serglige Con Culainn ocus óenét Emire; Aided Óenḟir Aífe; Echtra Nerai; De chophur in dá muccida; Aislinge Óenguso; Táin bó Dartada; Táin bó Flidais; Táin bó Regamain; Táin bó Regamna; Táin bó Fraích; Táin bó Cúailnge; Aided Derbḟorgaill; Aided Chon Culainn (A); Scéla mucce Meic Dathó; Bruiden Da Choca; Aided Fergusa meic Róich; Aided Lóegaire Búadaig; Aided Chon Roí; Aided Cheltchair maic Uithechair; Aided Chonchobair; Aided Ailella ocus Chonaill Chernaig; Aided Cheit meic Mágach; Aided Meidbe; Síaburcharpat Con Culainn.
15918.
Toner (Gregory): Desire and divorce in Serglige Con Culainn.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 135–166.
4585.
Hily (Gaël): Lleu et Cúchulainn: destins croisés.
In Ollodagos 16/2 (2002), pp. 231–254.
Irish material used in this study is based on Serglige Con Culainn.

Sermo ad reges

13317.
Miles (Brent): The Sermo ad reges from the Leabhar Breac and Hiberno-Latin tradition.
In Authorities and adaptations (2014), pp. 141–158.
Studies the reutilization of earlier materials (particularly the Collectio canonum Hibernensis) for the composition of this bilingual homily on the duties of kings.

Sermons (Bishop Gallagher)

1676.
Ó Néill (Séamus): Bishop Gallagher’s Sermons.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 209–213.
Spelling and pronunciation of James Gallagher’s (bishop of Raphoe 1725–37) sermons.
7598.
Mac Murchaidh (Ciarán): Text and translation of James Gallagher’s ‘A sermon on the assumption of Our Blessed Lady’ (1736).
In ArH 62 (2009), pp. 154–182.
7617.
Mac Murchaidh (Ciarán): Oiliúint na cléire san 18ú haois agus an Dochtúir Séamas Ó Gallchóir.
In Taighde agus teagasc 1 (2001), pp. 11–25.
11687.
Mac Murchaidh (Ciarán): Seanmóirí an Easpaig Séamas Ó Gallchóir: eagráin, aistriúcháin agus aidhmeanna.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 417–444.

Seven journeys of the soul

1580.
Herbert (Máire): The seven journeys of the soul.
In Éigse 17/1 (Samhradh 1977), pp. 1–11.
[1.] Poem beg. Cétna laithe tair[ir]aith by Moelmoedóc Ua Mongair, ed. from MS RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), with English translation and notes; [2.] Poem beg. Anum ó téid as a corp, ed. from Laud Misc. 615, with English translation and notes; [3.] Brief prose text beg. Secht n-aisdir do-ghní an anuim tar éis an chuirp d’fhágbháil, ed. from MS NLI G 1, with English translation. Includes an appendix with 4 additional interpolated stanzas from Laud.
14599.
Wright (Charles D.): Latin analogues for The seven journeys of the soul.
In End and beyond (2014), pp. 475–481.
Edition of six Latin analogues, with English translation.

Seven wise masters

11029.
Koehler (Axel): Bàillidh Lunnainn agus Seachd saoidh na Ròimhe.
In SGS 26 (Summer 2010), pp. 7–22.

Seventeen wonders of the night of Christ’s birth

1100.
Beyers (Rita) (app. auth.), Breatnach (Caoimhín) (ed.), Carey (John) (ed.), Herbert (Máire) (ed.), Kaestli (Jean-Daniel) (ed.), McNamara (Martin) (ed.), Ó Cuív (Brian) (ed.), Ó Fiannachta (Pádraig) (ed.), Ó Laoghaire (Diarmuid) (ed.): Apocrypha Hiberniae: I. Evangelia infantiae / ediderunt et commentariis instruxerunt Martin McNamara, Caoimhín Breatnach, John Carey, Máire Herbert, Jean-Daniel Kaestli, Brian Ó Cuív (†), Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire (†); appendices adiunxerunt Jean-Daniel Kaestli, Rita Beyers, Martin McNamara; iuvante The Irish Biblical Association.
CCSA, 13–14. Turnhout: Brepols, 2001. xvi + 1203 pp.
Vol. 13: [1.] General introduction, by M. McN.; [2.] The Irish infancy narratives and their relationship with latin sources, by M. McN. and J.-D. K.; [3.] The Liber flavus Fergusiorum infancy narrative: introduction by M. McN., edition by D. Ó L. and C. B., translation by D. Ó L., M. H. and C. B., notes to the translation by M. McN. and J.-D. K.; [4.] The infancy narrative of the Leabhar Breac and related manuscripts: introduction by M. McN., text by P. Ó F., B. Ó C. and C. B., apparatus criticus by B. Ó C. and C. B., translation by P. Ó F., M. H. and C. B., notes to the translation by M. McN. and J.-D. K.; [5.] A versified narrative of the childhood deeds of the Lord Jesus [from MS NLI G 50]: introduction by M. H. and M. McN., edition and translation by M. H., notes to the translation by M. McN.

Vol. 14: [6.] A thirteenth-century Irish poem containing elements from infancy narratives: introduction, edition, translation and notes by B. Ó C. [Sa ráith-se rugadh Muire, ascribed to Giolla Brighde Albanach; based on RIA D ii 1, with readings from Rawlinson B 486; normalized to Early Modern Irish]; [7.] Hiberno-Latin texts on the wonders at Christ’s birth: introduction, edition, translation and notes by M. McN.; [8.] Short texts relating to the Nativity of Christ: introduction, edition and translation by B. Ó C. and C. B., notes to the translation by M. McN. [1. A narrative of the Caesarean tax and the birth of Christ (a. Irish version, beg. Ochtauín Auguist ba hairdríg; text based on Leabhar Breac); 2. The seventeen wonders of the night of Christ’s birth (a. Prose, entitled Do secht n-ingantaib déc in domain in adaig ro génir Críst; b. Verse, beg. In n-aidchi geini Críst cain; c. Additional wonder); 3. The marvels of the birth of the Saviour (a. Text from Paris, Fonds celtique 1, and Maynooth R 73; b. Variant version from Liber flavus Fergusiorum)]; [9.] Appendix [(1.) Latin infancy Gospels. The J Compilation: introduction and edition by J.-D. K. and M. McN.; (2.) Latin translation of the protoevangelium of James in MS. Paris, Sainte-Geneviève, 2787: introduction and edition by R. B.].

Rev. by

J.-Cl. Haelewyck, in Revue théologique de Louvain 35/2 (2004), pp. 244-245.
Pierre-Yves Lambert, in ÉtC 36 (2008), pp. 214-215.
Brendan McConvery, in Irish theological quarterly 70/1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 86-89.
Uáitéar Mac Gearailt, in StH 35 (2008-2009), pp. 229-235.
Stephen D. Moore, in Catholic Biblical quarterly 66/1 (2004), pp. 155-156.
Thomas O’Loughlin, in Analecta Bollandiana 122/1 (2004), pp. 196-199.
Pádraig P. Ó Néill, in Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 133-136.
P. Ó Riain, in ZCP 55 (2006), pp. 275-276.
Erich Poppe, in CMCS 49 (Summer, 2005), pp. 74-77.
Clare Stancliffe, in Journal of theological studies 59 (2008), pp. 820-827.

11864.
Ivanov (Sergey): On the later development of the legend of portents at Christ’s birth.
In CMCS 63 (Summer 2012), pp. 71–89.

Sex aetates mundi

1650.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): The Irish Sex aetates mundi.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1983. xi + 188 pp.
Composed c. 1090 by Dublittir ua hUathgaile, including his poem Rédig dam a Dé do nim. Edition based on Rawlinson B 502; with English translation and notes.

Rev. by
Enrico Campanile, in ZCP 41 (1986), p. 330.
John Carey, in StH 24 (1984-1988), pp. 160-163.
Máire Herbert, in CMCS 11 (1986), pp. 97-112.
Pierre-Yves Lambert, in ÉtC 23 (1986), pp. 346-347.
Pádraig Ó Néill, in Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 437-445.
1651.
Tristram (Hildegard L. C.): Sex aetates mundi: Die Weltzeitalter bei den Angelsachsen und den Iren. Untersuchungen und Texte.
AF, 165. Heidelberg: Winter, 1985. 368 pp.
Rev. by
Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel, in ZCP 43 (1989), pp. 254-257.
Máire Herbert, in CMCS 11 (1986), pp. 97-112.
2464.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Aspects of the textual transmission of Sex aetates mundi and Druimm Cetta Céte na noem.
In Éigse 35 (2005), pp. 9–26.
Criticises D. Ó Cróinín's stemmatic representation of MS witnesses to his recension I of Sex aetates mundi and contends against P. Ó Riain's view that MS Rawlinson B 502 is to be identified as the Book of Glendalough.
3183.
Glaeske (Keith): The children of Adam and Eve in medieval Irish literature.
In Ériu 56 (2006), pp. 1–11.
Examines Irish extra-biblical traditions concerning the number and names of Adam and Eve’s children, concluding that these are native for the most part and bear no relation to other Christian and Jewish expansions of the Genesis.
11863.
Clarke (Michael): The lore of the monstrous races in the developing text of the Irish Sex aetates mundi.
In CMCS 63 (Summer 2012), pp. 15–49.
Examines evidence from versions of a variant recension found in the Book of Ballymote and the Book of Lecan, particularly concerning the account of the descent of Cain and Noah’s son Cham.
15760.
Sims-Williams (Patrick): Leprechauns and Luperci, Aldhelm and Augustine.
In Sacred histories [Fs. Herbert] (2015), pp. 409–418.
Adds to the discussion by J. Bisagni (in CMCS 64.47ff) and cites a further passage from Augustine’s De civitate Dei (xviii.10) that provides evidence for the misunderstanding of the Luperci by Irish scholars.
15919.
Wadden (Patrick): Prímchenéla and fochenéla in the Irish Sex aetates mundi.
In Ériu 66 (2016), pp. 167–178.
Argues that the distinction between between primary and subordinate nations was developed by the author of the Irish Sex aetates mundi in order to account for the existence of more than the canonical seventy-two nations mentioned in Genesis, prímchenéla (or cenéla écsamla) being those created at the Tower of Babel, and fochenéla those created afterwards from the older ones and not possessing their own language.

Sgáthán an chrábhaidh al. Desiderius (Flaithrí Ó Maolchonaire)

1898.
Ua Súilleabháin (Seán): Sgáthán an chrábhaidh: foinsí an aistriúcháin.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 26–36.
7116.
Ua Súilleabháin (Seán): Údar Sgáthán an chrábhaidh.
In MaynR 14 (Dec. 1989), pp. 42–50.
On the authorship of the original Catalan text Spill de la vida religiosa.
7407.
O’Connor (Thomas): ‘Perfidious machiavellian friar’: Florence Conry’s campaign for a Catholic restoration in Ireland, 1592-1616.
In SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 91–105.
15104.
Ryan (Salvador): A wooden key to open Heaven’s door: lessons in practical Catholicism from St. Anthony’s College, Louvain.
In Irish Franciscans 1534–1990 (2009), pp. 221–232.

Sgéala muice Meic Dha Thó

1141.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Patronage, politics and prose: Ceasacht Inghine Guile, Sgéala muice Meic Dha Thó, Oidheadh Chuinn Chéadchathaigh.
MM, 5. Maynooth: An Sagart, 1996. viii + 180 pp. (Maynooth monographs, 5).
Edition with transl. and notes of three tales from MSS RIA 24 P 12, NLI G 448, and TCD H 6. 8. Contains section on language of texts (pp. 142-67).

Rev. by
Tomás Ó Concheanainn, in CMCS 32 (Winter, 1996), p. 122.
Máirín Ní Dhonnchadha, in Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 216-229.
1086.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): The early modern version of Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó: tempus, locus, persona et causa scribendi.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 37–60.
1. The manuscripts; 2. Relationship of [MSS] P [RIA 24 P 12], G [NLI G 448] and H [TCD 1412 (H 6.8)]; 3. Scribes and MSS; 4. Possible date and scribe of P [wr. between 1638 and 1648 by Giolla Pádraig Ó Luinín]; 5. Rawlinson B 512 and the Early Modern version; 6. Additional topographical material; 7. Purpose of additional topographical material; 8. The significance of the Conall Cearnach episode; 9. The significance of further changes in the Early Modern version; 10. The relevance of the Early Modern version [tale reworked between 1567-90, and was written for the MacDonnells of Antrim to justify the murder of Seaán Ó Néill (1567) by the MacDonnells]; 11. The redactor of the Early Modern version [a member of the Ó Duibhgeannáin family or Brian Ó Gnímh]. App.: The Edinburgh version (E [NLS Advocates’ Library 72.1.36]) of SMMD. Cf. C. Breatnach, in Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 119-138; 43 (1992), pp. 159-176.

Sgél in Mínaduir

10588.
Hillers (Barbara): Sgél in Mínaduir: Dädalus und der Minotaurus in Irland.
In Übersetzung, Adaptation und Akkulturation im insularen Mittelalter (1999), pp. 131–144.
Text from RIA D iv 2; with textual notes, German translation, and a discussion of the classical sources for this story.

Shakespeare, William

2528.
Ó Háinle (Cathal): Múin aithrighe dhamh, a Dhé revised.
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 103–123.
New edition of the poem (supersedes L. McKenna 1919 [Best2 1759], 65-68), based on Book of O’Conor Don 50r-51r (33 qq.); now attributed to Tadhg Óg Ó hUiginn. With a selection of variant readings from other MSS, translation, commentary and textual notes. Also includes a discussion of the motif of the blood-spotted hand, shown to differ in its structure from that in Gesta Romanorum but analogous to that used by Shakespeare for his Lady Macbeth. Provides an appendix with the translation of the Gesta Romanorum version of De amore inordinato.
12547.
MacQuarrie (Charles W.): Celticity in the works of William Shakespeare: ‘Heavens defend me from that Welsh fairy, lest he transform me to a piece of cheese!'.

Shaw, William (1749–1831)

1317.
de Bhaldraithe (Tomás): Nótaí ar fhocail.
In Éigse 29 (1996), pp. 51–55.
1. conús [also conuas, conas, both < canós]; 2. froisín [< fras + ín]; 3. priompallán [also pr(o)impeallán, prompalán < Engl ‘bumble’ (= ‘bumblebee’; prombarlán, plumbarlán, primpearlán, plimpearlán, prumparlán < Engl ‘bumbler’ (= ‘bumblebee’); variants with tr(i)omp-, trump-, treamp- influenced by trompa ‘jew’s harp’; ‘etymological’ spelling proimpsheilleán derives from W. Shaw’s form priompsheillain]; 4. rumpall [< Engl ‘rumble’; cf. ‘etymological’ spelling rumptholl]; 5. *alfat ‘a cause’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707), who copied two consecutive words (al, fáth) in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662) as one word; gives rise to other variants: alfad, álfath, alfáth]; 6. *alfhalach ‘hide’ [an error traceable to E. Lhuyd (1707) for a bhfalach in R. Plunkett’s dictionary (1662); gives rise to alfalach ‘thoroughly hid’].
10648.
MacDonald (Kenneth D.): The Rev. William Shaw: pioneer Gaelic lexicographer.
In TGSI 50 (1976–1978), pp. 1–19.
4426.
Falileyev (Alexander): Irish references in early Scottish Gaelic grammars: a typological parallel.
In ScotL 16 (1997), pp. 74–81.
Refers to An analysis of the Gaelic language (1778) by William Shaw, and Elements of Gaelic grammar (1812) by Alexander Stewart.

Shea, Rev. James (1870–1959)

5161.
Ó Coigligh (Ciarán): Aspects of language and religion in the late nineteenth century: Rev. James Shea (1870-1959), itinerant preacher, diarist and poet of the Revival.
In StH 31 (2000–2001), pp. 139–146.

Sheehy, Nicholas

11688.
Mac Peaircín (Liam): Marbhna an Athar Nioclás Mac Síthigh.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 445–466.
Ag taisteal liom fá smúit im aonar, by Seán (or Seaghán) Cundún. 70 qq.; text based on RIA 23 B 4 (with variants from RIA 23 C 5, etc.).

Shorter Catechism (1659)

3763.
Thomson (R. L.): The language of the Shorter Catechism.
In SGS 12/1 (Sep. 1971), pp. 34–51.

Síabhradh sí agus innéirí Mhic na Míchomhairle

14405.
Watson (Seosamh): Mac na Míchomhairle.
LT, 31. Baile Átha Cliath: An Clóchomhar, 1979. 208 pp.
Edition of an early 18th c. folk-tale entitled Síabhradh sí agus innéirí Mhic na Míchomhairle, based on UCD Morris 8 (and Morris 7 where this is incomplete). Réamhrá, Téacs, Modh eagarthóireachta, Canúint na lámhscríbhinne, Malairtí, Foclóir. In Aguisín: Leagan béil den scéal [from MS UCC T. 37].

Síaburcharpat Con Culainn

2413.
Corthals (Johan): A reference to the listener to early Irish prose tales?
In CMCS 23 (Summer 1992), pp. 25–28.
ad LU, lines 9259-9260 (broga forfuil ina díaid inétside).
4532.
Corthals (Johan): Waartoe dienden de Vroeg-Ierse verhalen?
In Ollodagos 3/4 (1992), pp. 197–202.
ad LU lines 9259-9260 (broga forfuil ina díaid in étside). Cf. J. Corthals, in CMCS 23 (Summer, 1992), pp. 25-28. Draws conclusions concerning the transmission of Síaburcharpat Con Culainn.
4592.
Corthals (Johan) (trans.): Altirische Erzählkunst.
ForCelt, 1. Hamburg: Lit, 1996. 96 pp.
Contains German transls. of Orgain Denna Ríg, Tochmarc Étaíne, Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó, Aided Crimthainn meic Fhidaig, Tochmarc Becfhola, Síaburcharpat Con Culainn, Immram Snédgusa ocus maic Ríagla, Acallam na senórach (excerpt).

2nd rev. ed., North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2016.

Rev. by
Helen Imhoff, in Celtica 30 (2018), pp. 217-222 (2nd ed.).
8864.
Ó Béarra (Feargal): The otherworld realm of Tír scáith.
In Fs. Tristram (2009), pp. 81–100.
16674.
Mikhailova (T.): Саги об уладах [Sagi ob uladakh].
Москва [Moskva]: Аграф [Agraf], 2004. 640 pp.
[(In Russian:) Sagas from Ulster.]

Contains Russian transls. of: Noínden Ulad; Compert Conchobuir; Scéla Conchobuir meic Nessa; Longes mac nUislenn; Talland Étair; Tochmarc Lúaine ocus aided Athairne; Compert Con Culainn; Tochmarc Emire; Mesca Ulad; Fled Bricrenn; Serglige Con Culainn ocus óenét Emire; Aided Óenḟir Aífe; Echtra Nerai; De chophur in dá muccida; Aislinge Óenguso; Táin bó Dartada; Táin bó Flidais; Táin bó Regamain; Táin bó Regamna; Táin bó Fraích; Táin bó Cúailnge; Aided Derbḟorgaill; Aided Chon Culainn (A); Scéla mucce Meic Dathó; Bruiden Da Choca; Aided Fergusa meic Róich; Aided Lóegaire Búadaig; Aided Chon Roí; Aided Cheltchair maic Uithechair; Aided Chonchobair; Aided Ailella ocus Chonaill Chernaig; Aided Cheit meic Mágach; Aided Meidbe; Síaburcharpat Con Culainn.

Sibbald, Sir Robert (1641–1722)

1811.
Campbell (John L.): Unpublished letters by Edward Lhuyd in the National Library of Scotland.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 34–42.
Transcripts of four letters or extracts of letters: 1. from Lhuyd to Sir Robert Sibbald (1641-1722); 2. from Lhuyd to Dr Richard Richardson; 3. and 4. from Lhuyd to Archdeacon Nicolson (of Carlisle). Edited from MS NLS Advocates’ Library 33.3.19, with notes.

Sìleas na Ceapaich, al. Silis of Keppoch

9468.
Hillers (Barbara): Cleas a’ choin sholair: Aesop’s dog fable in the poetry of Sìleas na Ceapaich.
In Bile ós chrannaibh [Fs. Gillies] (2010), pp. 195–210.
12142.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Sìleas na Ceapaich.
In EHSL 1 (2007), pp. 305–314.

Sinnu moccu Min

1294.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): Mo-Sinnu Moccu Min and the Computus of Bangor.
In Peritia 1 (1982), pp. 281–295.
Edition and translation of a note on an intercalated slip in Würzburg MS M. p. th. f. 61 (incomplete in Thes ii 285). The computus which Mo-Sinnu (ob. 610) ‘learned by heart from a certain learned Greek’, and which Mo-Chuoróc maccu Neth Sémon wrote down, was a computus digitorum (a treatise on finger-reckoning), or Graecorum computus, not a method for reckoning time (viz. the Dionysiac cycle).

Sionáin, Uilliam

14709.
Ó Fiannachta (Pádraig) (ed.): Whereas cuntas, by Uilliam Sionáin.
In An barántas (1978), pp. 129–130, [no. 39].
From RIA 23 L 24.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

1605.
Jacobs (Nicolas): The Green Knight: an unexplored Irish parallel.
In CMCS 4 (Winter 1982), pp. 1–4.
The green knight in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is compared with the three red horsemen in Togail bruidne Da Derga.

Sir Generides

1702.
Williams (N. J. A.): The source of Imthechta Ghenerodeis.
In Éigse 17/3 (Samhradh 1978), pp. 297–300.
ad P. Ó Fiannachta, in IER 109 (Jan.-Jun., 1968), pp. 166–181 and N. J. Williams, in ZCP 33 (1974), pp. 128–39. Imthechta Ghenerodeis has the same source (though based on a Latin translation) as two Middle English metrical romances, Sir Generides and Generydes.
Ó Fiannachta (P.) (ref.), Williams (N. J. A.) (ref.)

Sírrabad Súaltaim

9517.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Sírrabad Súaltaim and the order of speaking among the Ulaid.
In A companion in linguistics [Fs. Ahlqvist] (2005), pp. 80–91.
Repr. in Coire sois, pp. 238-248.

Smollett, Tobias George (1721–1771)

1506.
Killeen (J. F.): An Irish song in Smollett?
In Éigse 15/1 (Samhradh 1973), p. 66.
Argues that Drimmendoo in Tobias Smollett’s The Expedition of Humphry Clinker (1771) represents the Irish song An druimfhionn dubh.

Solomon and Saturn

1084.
Wright (Charles D.): The three ‘victories’ of the wind: a Hibernicism in the Hisperica famina, Collectanea Bedae, and the Old English prose Solomon and Saturn Pater Noster dialogue.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 13–25.

Songs of the Irish (1843)

10240.
Ó Drisceoil (Proinsias): Conchúr Mac Suibhne.
In Bliainiris 4 (2003), pp. 130–153.

Spenser, Edmund (1552?–1599),

7947.
Carroll (Clare): Spenser and the Irish language: the Sons of Milesio in A view of the present state of Ireland, The faerie queene, book v, and the Leabhar gabhála.
In IUR 26/2 (Autumn 1996), pp. 281–290.
9232.
Carroll (Clare): Representations of women in some early modern English tracts on the colonization of Ireland.
In Albion 25/3 (Autumn 1993), pp. 379–393.
8196.
Maley (Willy): Spenser’s Irish English: language and identity in early modern Ireland.
In SP 91/4 (Autumn 1994), pp. 417–431.
On the influence of Middle English surviving in Elizabethan Ireland on Spencer’s literary language.
8197.
Forste-Grupp (Sheryl F.): A possible Irish source for the giant Coulin of Spenser’s Faerie Queene.
In SP 96/1 (Winter 1999), pp. 42–50.
13424.
Bradshaw (Brendan): Edmund Spenser on justice and mercy.
In HSt, 16 (1987), pp. 76–89.
17098.
Maley (Willy): Salvaging Spenser: colonialism, culture and identity.
LDS. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: The Macmillan Press, 1997. viii + 251 pp. (Language, discourse, society).

Spiritual rose, The (Mathew Kennedy)

492.
McKenna (Malachy): Historically-long stressed vowels in a South-East Ulster text.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 265–272.
As in The spiritual rose by Mathew Kennedy, first printed Monaghan 1800.
945.
McKenna (Malachy): The spiritual rose: prayers and meditations in Irish / edited by Malachy McKenna.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2001. lxxxiii + 424 pp.
Normalised ed. of Mathew Kennedy’s SR, published in Monaghan (1825), with original on facing pages. Incl. notes and glossary, and notes on language of the text.

Rev. by
Charlie Dillon, in StH 34 (2006-2007), pp. 244-245.
Anraí Mac Giolla Chomhaill, in SAM 19/1 (2002), pp. 280-281.
Pádraig Ó Riain, in ZCP 55 (2006), p. 279.
Seosamh Watson, in Béaloideas 71 (2003), pp. 287-289.
N. J. A. Williams, in Éigse 34 (2004), pp. 197-211.
1010.
McKenna (Malachy): Grammatical gender in a nineteenth-century Ulster text.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 182–204.
Based on M. McKenna (ed.), The spiritual rose (Dublin 2001).
364.
McKenna (Malachy): A note on E. Ulster nar and Old Irish náthar, nár.
In Celtica 16 (1984), p. 52.
Examples from The spiritual rose.
5382.
McKenna (Malachy): A textual history of The spiritual rose.
In Clogher record 14/1 (1991), pp. 52–73.

Springmount Bog tablets

3680.
Charles-Edwards (Gifford): The Springmount Bog tablets: their implications for insular epigraphy and palaeography.
In StC 36 (2002), pp. 27–45.

St. Beineán

1888.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): The Psalter of Cashel: a provisional list of contents.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 107–130.

St. Gall Glosses

816.
Feuth (Els): Gemination: an Old Irish mutation rule?
In Ériu 34 (1983), pp. 143–156.
Appendix: An inventory of word-initial gemination including nasalization by means of gemination in Würzburg, Milan and St Gall.
14880.
Ahlqvist (Anders): Notes on the Greek materials in the St. Gall Priscian (Codex 904).
In Sacred nectar of the Greeks (1988), pp. 195–214.

Stair Éamuinn Uí Chléire

12833.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Corrghliceas ainmníochta: idir Bhéarla agus Ghaeilge in ainmneacha dílse Stair Éamuinn Uí Chléire.
In Séimhfhear suairc [Fs. B. Ó Conchúir] (2013), pp. 110–123.
14861.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Béarla sa Ghaeilge. Cabhair choigríche: an códmheascadh Gaeilge/Béarla i litríocht na Gaeilge, 1600-1900.
LT, 98. Baile Átha Cliath: An Clóchomhar, 2007. xv + 367 pp.
Rev. by
Ciarán Mac Murchaidh, in StH 35 (2008-2009), pp. 258-261.
Nancy Stenson, in Celtica 28 (2016), pp. 254-259.

Stair Ercuil ocus a bás

2832.
Poppe (Erich): Stair Nuadat Find Femin: eine irische Romanze?
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 749–759.
Compares the concept of the hero in this narrative with that of its likely English models, and argues in favour of considering it an example of medieval romance, purposely composed by Uilliam Mac an Leagha as an Irish answer to the pagan Greece-set Stair Ercuil ocus a bás.
5132.
Ross (Bianca): The transformation of non-Irish narratives into an Irish context: Uilliam Mac an Lega’s early modern Irish adaptation of the story of Hercules.
In StH 29 (1995–1997), pp. 185–193.
Examines the differences between Stair Ercuil ocus a bás and its source, William Caxton’s Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye, especially with regard to the portrayal of the hero.
8127.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The Greek background to Stair Ercuil ocus a bás.
In Translations from classical literature (2006), pp. 20–36.
8128.
Poppe (Erich): Stair Ercuil ocus a bás: rewriting Hercules in Ireland.
In Translations from classical literature (2006), pp. 37–68.
14356.
Ross (Bianca): Bildungsidol, Ritter, Held: Herkules bei William Caxton und Uilliam Mac an Lega.
Heidelberg: Winter, 1989. 271 pp. (Britannica et Americana; 3. Folge, Bd. 10.)
Rev. by
P.-Y. Lambert, in ÉtC 30 (1994), pp. 329-330.
Erich Poppe, in Celtica 22 (1991), pp. 184-185.

Stair Nicoméid

8070.
Hughes (Ian) (ed.): Stair Nicoméid. The Irish Gospel of Nicodemus / edited and translated by Ian Hughes.
ITS, 55. London: Irish Texts Society, 1991. xlvi + 138 pp.
An Irish translation of the Latin apocrypha Gesta Pilati and Descensus Christi ad Inferos. Edition based on YBL; with English translation, apparatus criticus, comparison with original Latin text and textual notes. Also includes two divergent versions from the Leabhar Breac (fols. 170a-172b and 223a-227a); with English translation, commentary and textual notes.

Rev. by
Caoimhín Breatnach, in Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 162-167.
Uáitéar Mac Gearailt, in CMCS 24 (Winter, 1992), pp. 105-108.
Anraí Mac Giolla Chomhaill, in SAM 14/2 (1991), pp. 261-262.
Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, in StH 26 (1992), pp. 239-243.
Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire, in Studies 81/321 (Spring, 1992), pp. 108-110.

Stair Nuadat Find Femin

2832.
Poppe (Erich): Stair Nuadat Find Femin: eine irische Romanze?
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 749–759.
Compares the concept of the hero in this narrative with that of its likely English models, and argues in favour of considering it an example of medieval romance, purposely composed by Uilliam Mac an Leagha as an Irish answer to the pagan Greece-set Stair Ercuil ocus a bás.
5692.
Barron (Thomas J.): Stair Nuadat Find Fenim, and Sliabh nDee, alias Sliabh na Trí nDee, alias Sliabh Guaire.
In Breifne 5/17 (1976), pp. 158–173.
Attempts to identify place names mentioned in Uilliam Mac an Leagha’s Stair Nuadat, arguing some of these can be related to the Corleck Hill area (tld. of Drumeague) in Co. Cavan.

Stanihurst, Richard (1552–1618)

2056.
Harrison (Alan): The Shower of Hell.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 304.
Etym. of Ir. ceithearn.

Stapleton, Theobald (c.1589–1647)

6328.
O’Reilly (Mary): Seventeenth-century Irish catechisms: European or not?
In ArH 50 (1996), pp. 102–112.
16327.
Ryan (Salvador): Continental catechisms and their Irish imitators in Spanish Habsburg lands, c. 1550–c. 1650.
In Irish Europe, 1600–1650 (2013), pp. 163–182.
Examines five Irish-language catechisms: Ó hEodhasa’s, Stapleton’s, Gearnon’s, Ó Maolchonaire’s, and an anonymous tract in RIA 23 L 19.

Stephens, James

214.
Bramsbäck (Birgit): Fenian material in the work of James Stephens.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 3–18.

Stewart, Alexander (1764–1821)

4426.
Falileyev (Alexander): Irish references in early Scottish Gaelic grammars: a typological parallel.
In ScotL 16 (1997), pp. 74–81.
Refers to An analysis of the Gaelic language (1778) by William Shaw, and Elements of Gaelic grammar (1812) by Alexander Stewart.

Stowe Tract on the Mass

13042.
Ó Néill (Pádraig): The Old Irish tract on the Mass in the Stowe Missal: some observations on its origins and textual history.
In Seanchas [Fs. Byrne] (2000), pp. 199–204.
Argues that the Stowe tract on the Mass is an abbreviation of a text preserved also in a later, more faithful version in Leabhar Breac, and draws conclusions on liturgical changes in the intervening centuries.
11835.
Weeda (Peter): The Irish, the Virgin Mary and Proclus of Constantinople.
In Peritia 22–23 (2011–2012), pp. 83–106.
Analyses a group of five attributes of Mary found in four Old Irish texts: Stowe tract on the Mass, Cáin Adomnáin, Cú Chuimne’s Hymnum in laudem S. Mariae, Blathmac’s poems.
13904.
Ó Dochartaigh (Caitriona): Abhlann.
In Treasures of Irish Christianity (2012), pp. 60–62.
13903.
McNamara (Martin): The Eucharist in the Stowe Missal: words and actions in the Mass, figures, symbols of higher truths.
In Treasures of Irish Christianity (2012), pp. 57–59.

Suidigud Tige Midchúarta (prose)

8917.
Downey (Clodagh): Dindṡenchas and the tech midchúarta.
In Ériu 60 (2010), pp. 1–35.
Examines descriptions of the banqueting hall at Tara in medieval Irish sources (particularly the Suidigud Tige Midchúarta poem, prose and seating plan) with a view to discovering how their authors understood its form and function, and argues that the association of the linear monument now known as Tech Midchúarta and the banqueting hall was a later development.

Suidigud Tigi Midchúarta

8193.
Sayers (William): A cut above: ration and station in an Irish king’s hall.
In FoF 4/2 (1990), pp. 89–110.
Studies the organization of the king’s banquet as described in Suidigud Tigi Midchúarta, discussing in particular the carving sequence and the hierarchically distributed cuts of meat: 1. lónchrúachait; 2. leschrúachait; 3. loarg; 4. muc formuin; 5. colpthae; 6. crúachait medóin; 7. cunn; 8. mael; 9. midimir; 10. milgetan; 11. camchnáim; 12. colpthae muc; 13. remor n-imdae; 14. dronn.

Suidugud Tellaich Temra

17047.
Nic Cárthaigh (Emma): Surviving the flood: revenants and antediluvian lore in medieval Irish texts.
In Transmission and transformation in the Middle Ages (2007), pp. 40–64.
Analyses characters in early Irish literature who embody the theme of transmission and transformation through surviving as repositories of antediluvian lore in the form of shape-shifters and mythic visionaries (exemplified by Tuán mac Cairill and Fintan mac Bóchra).

Sulpicius Severus

1462.
Borsje (Jacqueline): The monster in the River Ness in Vita Sancti Columbae: a study of a miracle.
In Peritia 8 (1994), pp. 27–34.
Discusses potential historical and literary contexts for Adomnán’s Vita Sancti Columbae, ii 27. A literary model is suggested from the Dialogi of Sulpicius Severus.
2429.
McCarthy (Daniel): The origin of the Latercus Paschal cycle of the insular Celtic churches.
In CMCS 28 (Winter 1994), pp. 25–49.
Discusses the date and authorship of the latercus found in MS Padova, Biblioteca Antoniana, scaff. I, 27 and its relationship with the Liber Anatolii.

Sunday Letter

1259.
Borsje (Jacqueline): The bruch in the Irish version of the Sunday Letter.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 83–98.
Purports to be written by Jesus Christ in heaven to inculcate Sunday observance. 1. The Sunday letter; 2. The Irish version [Epistil Ísu]; 3. The bruch [< Lat bruchus/brucus].

Swift, Jonathan (1667–1745)

5516.
Ó Háinle (Cathal): Notitiae: 4. Pléaráca na Ruarcach.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977–1978), pp. 228–235.
Discusses the popularity of Aodh Mac Gabhráin’s song and the 18th-century English translations by Dean Swift and Charles Henry Wilson.

Synge, John Millington

468.
Bramsbäck (Birgit): Synge’s Old Maurya and Old Irish imbas forosnai.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 17–27.