16166.
Henley (Georgia) (ed.), Russell (Paul) (ed.), Eska (Joseph F.) (assist. ed.): Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature: studies in honor of Daniel F. Melia / Georgia Henley, Paul Russell: editors; with the collaboration of Joseph F. Eska.
CSANAY, 11–12. Hamilton, NY: Colgate University Press, 2014. xliv + 198 pp.
pp. xix-xxv: Bibliography of D.M., comp. by Karen E. Burgess.
Melia (Daniel Frederick) (hon.)

Classifications:

16167.
Ahlqvist (Anders): A rhetorical poem in Longes mac nUislenn.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 1–7.
A Deirdriu, maindēra[e] már (cf. Vernam Hull, pp. 44-45 in Longes mac nUislenn 1949 [BILL: 4973]). Text, English translation, Textual notes and Commentary.

16168.
Clancy (Thomas Owen): Early Gaelic nature poetry revisited.

16169.
Davies (Morgan Thomas): Anecdota from Irish manuscripts.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 20–38.
Discusses Echtra Ambacuc.

16170.
Gillies (William): From milk-cow blues to hardheaded women: decoding the Bard Macintyre.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 47–62.
Offers a preliminary study of the poems of the Bard Macintyre in the Book of the Dean of Lismore.

16171.
Henley (Georgia): Through the ethnographer’s eyes: rhetoric, ethnicity, and quotation in the Welsh and Irish works of Gerald of Wales.

16172.
Holmberg (Matthew): Triple utterances and curse-poles: a common form of northern European satire?
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 75–93.
Points out the similarities in form and function between OIr. treḟocul and Norse niðstǫng, arguing in favour of a common origin for these two maledictory practices.

16173.
Howlett (David): Sonid’s Ogam signature.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 94–97.
Numerical analysis of the Latin colophon in the Stowe Missal (fo. 11r).

16174.
McCone (Kim): A brief ornithology of sex.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 108–113.
Explores the sexual connotations of geese and swans particularly in medieval Irish and ancient Greek material.

16175.
McKenna (Catherine): The grammar, rhetoric, and exegetical logic of Ultán’s Hymn.

16176.
Nagy (Joseph Falaky): Death by pillow.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 128–136.
Discusses the episode of the death of Conán mac an Léith Luachra in Acallam na senórach ll.3487-3637 (as ed. by W. Stokes in IT 4/1).

16177.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The making of a prince: Áed oll fri andud n-áne.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 137–154.
Offers a detailed analysis of the panegyric in Thes. ii 295.

16178.
Russell (Paul): Horticultural genealogy and genealogical horticulture: the metaphors of W. plant and OIr. cland.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 155–172.
Discusses the origin of the post-classical senses (‘plant’ and ‘offspring’) with which Lat. planta (‘sole of the foot’; ‘plant cutting’) was borrowed into Irish.

16179.
Sweetser (Eve): Advantage and disadvantage: cognate formulas for a Welsh and Irish topos of otherworldly ambiguity.
In Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature [Melia studies] (2014), pp. 191–194.
Argues that the use of les and aimles in Tochmarc Étaíne (cf. LU 10822-3) possibly represents an inherited Common Celtic formula.