Authors and Textual Sources

Caelius Sedulius

1607.
Wright (Neil): The Hisperica famina and Caelius Sedulius.
In CMCS 4 (Winter 1982), pp. 61–76.
Identifies literary borrowings in the B text of Hisperica famina from the Carmen Paschale of Caelius Sedulius.

Caillech Bérre

2710.
Murdoch (Brian): In pursuit of the Caillech Bérre: an early Irish poem and the medievalist at large.
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 80–127.
Studies the various English versions available of this poem.

Caillech Bérri

7379.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Mythology in early Irish literature.
In Celtic consciousness (1982), pp. 143–154.
Early Irish literary tradition exemplified by Noínden Ulad, Immram Brain, and Caillech Bérri.
4320.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): A literary footnote: the nun of Beare.
In ScoGS 17 (1996), pp. 205–212.
4205.
Ritari (Katja): Images of ageing in the early Irish poem Caillech Bérri.
In SCF 3 (2006), pp. 57–70.
216.
Carey (John): Transmutations and immortality in the lament of the old woman of Beare.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 30–37.

Caimbeul, Donnchadh al. Campbell, Duncan

3717.
Gillies (William): The Gaelic poems of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy (I).
In ScoGS 13/1 (Autumn 1978), pp. 18–45.
Poems by Donnchadh Caimbeul of Glenorchy: 1. Teachtaire cuireas i gcéin (4 qq.); 2. Fada ó mhalluigh Dia na mná (6 qq.); 3. Atá amhghar fá na mnáibh (6 qq.); 4. Uch, is mise an giolla mór (4 qq.). Transcribed and restored form the Book of the Dean of Lismore; with English translation and notes.

[Continued in ScoGS 13/2 (Summer, 1981), pp. 263-288].

3730.
Gillies (William): The Gaelic Poems of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy (II).
In ScoGS 13/2 (Summer 1981), pp. 263–288.
V. Cé don Phléid as ceann uidhe (23 qq.); VI. Mairg ó ndeachaidh a léim lúidh (13 qq.). Transcribed and restored form the Book of the Dean of Lismore; with English translation and notes.

[Continued from ScoGS 13/1 (Autumn, 1978), pp. 18-45]; [Continued in ScoGS 14/1 (Winter 1983), pp. 59–82].

4262.
Gillies (William): The Gaelic Poems of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy (III).
In ScoGS 14/1 (Winter 1983), pp. 59–82.
VII. Bod bríoghmhor atá ag Donncha (8 qq.); VIII. A shagairt na hamshóige (6 qq.); IX. Créad dá ndearnadh Domhnall Donn (7 qq.). Transcribed and restored form the Book of the Dean of Lismore; with English translation and notes.

[Continued from ScoGS 13/2 (Summer, 1981), pp. 263-288].

6088.
Flahive (Joseph J.): Duncan Campbell: a Scottish Gaelic bard in eighteenth century Cork.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 80–89.
al. Donnchadh Caimbeul. Includes an edition of Còirneal Sheumas, Chùil Dhaothail, in praise of Colonel James Fraser; with English translation and notes.

Cáin Adomnáin

1367.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí), Fanning (Thomas) (app. auth.): Rath Melsigi, Willibrord, and the earliest Echternach manuscripts.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 17–49.
Argues that the earliest Echternach codices were strongly influenced by Irish scribal tradition. Rath Melsigi (identified as Clonmelsh, Co. Carlow), mentioned by Bede, is suggested as training ground for Willibrord’s mission to Frisia. Uuictberct, an Anglo-Saxon scholar, is identified with Ichtbricht on the witness list of Cáin Adomnáin. Posits a reference to Druim Léas (Drumlease, Co. Leitrim) in the Calendar of Willibrord. Incl. app. ‘Some field monuments in the townlands of Clonmelsh and Garryhundon, Co. Carlow’, pp. 43-49 by Thomas Fanning. Cf. K. Murphy, in Peritia 8 (1994), p. 169.
Murphy (K.) (ref.)
4132.
Grigg (Juliana): Aspects of the Cáin: Adomnán’s Lex Innocentium.
In JAEMA 1 (2005), pp. 41–50.
5768.
Ó Fiannachta (Pádraig): Cáin Adamnáin.
In LCC 12 (1982), pp. 93–111.
12623.
McLeod (Neil): Cáin Adomnáin and the Lombards.
In Language and power in the Celtic world (2011), pp. 241–265.
1291.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): The guarantor list of Cáin Adomnáin, 697.
In Peritia 1 (1982), pp. 178–215.
Edited from Rawlinson B 512 with variant readings from Brussels 2324-40. Includes an identification of most of the guarantors. Concludes that list was drawn up in 697, but that many of the titles were added later on.

Cáin Aicillne

2661.
McLeod (Neil): Interpreting early Irish law: status and currency. Part 2.
In ZCP 42 (1987), pp. 41–115.
Reconstructs the honour-prices corresponding to the previously discussed grades and examines the units of currency used in payments.

Continued from ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 46-65.

Cáin aicillne

10605.
Binchy (D. A.): Brewing in eighth-century Ireland.
In Studies on early Ireland [Duignan essays] (1982), pp. 3–6.
ad Cáin aicillne §8 (as ed. by R. Thurneysen, in ZCP 14 (1923), pp. 336-394 [1. Das Unfrei-Lehen], etc.); particularly on the process of mashing (OIr. imdell).

Cáin Aigillne

1617.
Gerriets (Marilyn): Economy and society: clientship according to the Irish laws.
In CMCS 6 (Winter 1983), pp. 43–61.
Analysis of obligations of aigillne ‘base clientship’ and choice of clientship partner based on Críth Gablach, Cáin Aigillne and other legal texts.

Cáin domnaig

10607.
Hamlin (Ann): Using mills on Sunday.
In Studies on early Ireland [Duignan essays] (1982), p. 11.
Concerns Epistil Ísu (as ed. by J. G. O’Keefe, in Ériu 2, (1905), pp. 189-214 [Cáin domnaig: 1. The epistle concerning Sunday]).
3438.
Eska (Charlene M.): Rewarding informers in Cáin domnaig and the laws of Wihtred.
In CMCS 52 (Winter 2006), pp. 1–11.

Cáin Éimíne Báin

402.
Poppe (Erich): A new edition of Cáin Éimíne Báin.
In Celtica 18 (1986), pp. 35–52.
Critical edition from MSS RIA 23 P 3 and BL Additional 30512, normalised to Old Irish standard; with English translation and notes.
387.
Poppe (Erich): A Middle Irish poem on Éimíne’s bell.
In Celtica 17 (1985), pp. 59–72.
beg. In clocán-sa na ríg ruad (32 qq.). Critical edition (normalised) from MSS RIA 23 P 3, BL , TCD H 1. 11, and Brussels 2324–40; with English translation and notes. A versified elaboration of the narrative of Cáin Émíne Báin which it follows in the manuscripts.
515.
Poppe (Erich): The list of sureties in Cáin Éimíne.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 588–592.

Cáin Fhuithrime

1880.
Ó Coileáin (Seán): Mag Fuithirbe revisited.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 16–26.
ad D. A. Binchy, The date and provenance of Uraicecht becc (BILL III: 7325). On Cáin Fhuithirbe (CIH ii 688.2-10).

Cáin Ḟuithirbe

1029.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia VI: 2. The preterite of sichid/seichid ‘says’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 191–192.
ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 5 (1960), pp. 80-81. 3 sg. rel. sı̄che attested in an Old Irish gloss in Cáin Ḟuithirbe.
Binchy (D. A.) (ref.)
1030.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia VI: 3. ardri as an old compound.
In Ériu 37 (1986), pp. 192–193.
ardri and gen. sg. ardrech, ardrach attested in Old Irish sources, incl. Cáin Ḟuithirbe. Brief discussion of tríath as being of higher status than a king.
1880.
Ó Coileáin (Seán): Mag Fuithirbe revisited.
In Éigse 23 (1989), pp. 16–26.
ad D. A. Binchy, The date and provenance of Uraicecht becc (BILL III: 7325). On Cáin Fhuithirbe (CIH ii 688.2-10).
3229.
Breatnach (Liam): The ecclesiastical element in the Old-Irish legal tract Cáin Fhuithirbe.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 36–52.
Discusses the various versions and the state of preservation of this text, analysing various passages with the aim of elucidating its date and style of composition and the ecclesiastical involvement in it.
907.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia VI: 1. The earlier form of lour ‘enough’.
In Ériu 37 (1986), p. 190.
ad R. Thurneysen, in ZCP 13 (1919), p. 105. Provides an example of the conjectured non-dissimilated roar from the Old Irish legal text Cáin Ḟuithirbe.

Cáin lánamna

3369.
Tatsuki (Akiko): The early Irish church and marriage: an analysis of the Hibernensis.
In Peritia 15 (2001), pp. 195–207.
4756.
Eska (Charlene M.): Non-lawful betrothals in early Irish law.
In KF 3 (2008), pp. 33–43.
Discusses the three types of betrothal mentioned in CIH i 144.10-17 (with English translation).
8189.
Eska (Charlene M.): Varieties of early Irish legal literature and the Cáin lánamna fragments.
In Viator 40/1 (2009), pp. 1–16.
Appendix: List of manuscript sources of the fragments of Cáin lánamna.
8532.
Eska (Charlene M.): Problematic pigs: swine values in Bodleian manuscript Rawlinson B 506.
In Celtica 26 (2010), pp. 23–30.
On the share of the profit from pigs due to the wife in the event of divorce, as set out in the ‘Appendix’ to Cáin lánamna (= CIH i 174.7-177.33).
10410.
Eska (Charlene M.): Cáin lánamna: an Old Irish tract on marriage and divorce law.
MLIP, 5. Leiden: Brill, 2010. xix + 377 pp.
Edited from H 2. 15A (= CIH ii 502.7-519.35) [normalized text, variants, glosses, commentaries]; with linguistic and legal notes, English translation, and glossary.

Appendices contain additional legal commentary, edited with English translation. 1: Text from Rawlinson B 506, fols. 19b-19d (= CIH i 89.26-90.32); 2: Text from Rawlinson B 506 fol. 42d (= CIH i 144.5-17); 3: Text from Rawlinson B 506 55b-56d (= CIH i 174.7-177.33); 4 Text from H 3. 18 p. 434a (= CIH iii 974.29-975.27); 5: Text from Rawlinson B 506 fol. 22a-b (= CIH i 95.37-96.30); 6: Additional commentary [duplicates].
11969.
Eska (Charlene M.): Celtic and Germanic light on Hittite divorce law.
In JIES 40/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2012), pp. 300–314.
4150.
Breatnach (Liam): Varia: 1. An Old Irish gloss on Cáin lánamna.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 155–160.
ad §14, as ed. by R. Thurneysen 1936 (Best2 2148).

Cáin ónae

8761.
Breatnach (Liam): Cáin ónae: an Old Irish law text on lending.
In FS Watkins (1998), pp. 29–46.
From TCD H 3. 18.

Cáin ṡóerraith

2815.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The briugu in early Irish society.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 482–493.
Discusses the term briugu and the process of promotion from the freemen grades to the noble grades according to early Irish law, and also argues, based on an analysis of their property qualifications and their moral character, that the briugu of Uraicecht becc and the mruigḟer of Críth gablach (complemented by the fer fothlai) are variant designations of the same rank.

Caismeachd Ailean nan Sop

4338.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Caismeachd Ailean nan Sop: towards a definitive text.
In ScoGS 18 (1998), pp. 89–110.
Examines the poem beg. 'S mithich dhuinne mar bhun umblachd, found in MS Nova Scotia Archives, MG15G/2/2; with metrical and textual commentary, normalised text, interpretation.

Caithchi Bech

1623.
Charles-Edwards (Thomas), Kelly (Fergus): Bechbretha: an Old Irish law-tract on bee-keeping.
Early Irish law series, 1. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1983. xii + 214 pp.
Normalised edition with variants based mainly on MS TCD H 2. 15A (also TCD H 3. 18, H 3. 17, H 2.12 (8iii); Egerton 88; RIA 23 Q 6; Rawlinson B 502, Rawlinson B 487); with English translations and notes. Commentaries from MSS TCD H 2. 15A, H 3. 17, H 3. 18 and Egerton 88 printed with English translations in Apps. 1–4. App. 5 contains restored text with English translations of an Old Irish passage on Caithchi Bech ‘trespass-penalties of bees’, based on MSS TCD E 3. 5 and H 3. 18. App. 6 contains a normalised version of an Old Irish passage on Athgabál Bech ‘distraint of bees’, based on D. A Binchy's edition, in Celtica 10 (1973), pp. 72–86 (§11), from MS TCD H 3. 18. App. 7 contains some of the Welsh material relating to bees.

Rev. by
Pádraig Ó Riain, in Éigse 21 (1986), pp. 241-243.

Caithréim Cellaig

2806.
Herbert (Máire): Caithréim Cellaig: some literary and historical considerations.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 320–332.
Discusses the background to the story, and argues that it was composed between the 11th and the early 12th century by an author from the Cloncmacnoise milieu with the intention of commending the loyalty to the old monastic system despite the newly acquired diocesan status.
11686.
Mac Muirí (Seosamh): Dún Eogain Bél forsind loch.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 405–416.
Discusses place names mentioned in the initial section of Caithréim Cellaig: 1. ‘Drochat Martra’; 2. ‘Scethín na Gaíthe’; 3. ‘cath Slicid’; 4. ‘Ráith Úa Fiachrach’; 5. `áenach Locha Gile’; 6a. ‘ardbrug Oilella’; 6b. ‘aittreb Eógain’; 6c ‘Dún Eogain Bél forsind loch’.
1948.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): Ceallach agus an doras a scaoil.
In Éigse 26 (1992), p. 92.
ad Caithréim Cellaig line 350 of LB version (as ed. by K. Mulchrone 1971; see BILL III: 5169): read do scáil.

Caithréim Chellacháin Chaisil

652.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Caithréim Chellacháin Chaisil: history or propaganda?
In Ériu 25 (1974), pp. 1–69.
1. The edition and the mss; 2. Comment on the text; 3. Historical analysis of the text; 4. The Vikings and CCC; 5. The date and background of CCC: ascribes it to 1127-34, during reign of Cormac Mac Carthaig; 6. The source-material used in CCC; 7. Conclusiuons.

Caithréim Chonghail Chláiringnigh

1601.
Gillies (William): Arthur in Gaelic tradition. Part II: Romances and learned lore.
In CMCS 3 (Summer 1982), pp. 41–75.
Discusses early modern Gaelic prose romances, e.g. Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha, Céilidhe Iosgaide Léithe, Eachtra Mhelóra agus Orlando, Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil, Eachtra Mhacaoimh an Iolair, Caithréim Chonghail Chláiringnigh, Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir; some discussion of associations with Arthur in local legend.

For part I, see CMCS 2 (Winter 1981), pp. 47-72.

Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh

4149.
Ní Úrdail (Meidhbhín): Some observations on the ‘Dublin Annals of Innisfallen’.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 133–153.
Discusses the sources and compilatory process of two substantial entries concerning the O’Briens of Thomond (s.a. 1014 and 1306) which draw upon Cath Chluana Tarbh and Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh respectively.
12650.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh, a literary text: action sensibility and world view.
In Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh (2012), pp. 1–32.
12652.
Ó Riain (Gordon): The language of Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh.
In Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh (2012), pp. 54–76.
12651.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh: the appendices.
In Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh (2012), pp. 33–53.
1598.
Nic Ghiollamhaith (Aoife): Dynastic warfare and historical writing in North Munster, 1276-1350.
In CMCS 2 (Winter 1981), pp. 73–89.
Discusses the political context of Uí Briain propoganda text Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh and the influence of Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh upon it; also some discussion of the poems Aonair duit a Bhriain Bhanba attributed to Muireadhach Albanach Ó Dálaigh, and Abair riomh a Éire a ógh.

Caitilín Dubh Keating

1003.
Breatnach (Pádraig A.): Cluiche caointeach ón seachtú céad déag.
In Celtica 24 (2003), pp. 55–57.
An example of the cluiche caointeach (‘keening joust’), beg. Go mbennuidhe Dia dhuit a Bhriain mhic Uaithne (30 ll.), the first part of which (ll. 1-20) is said to have been composed by Caitilín Dubh Keating. Ed. from MS NLI G 675.

Caldron of Poesy

834.
Breatnach (Liam): Addenda and corrigenda to The Caldron of Poesy (Ériu 32, 45-93).
In Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 189–191.
ad L. Breatnach, in Ériu 32 (1981), 45-93.
3576.
Henry (P. L.): The Caldron of Poesy.
In StC 14–15 (1979–1980), pp. 114–128.
From TCD H 3. 18, with English translation and notes. Cf. Best2 2267.
778.
Breatnach (Liam): The Caldron of Poesy.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 45–93.
Ed. with diplomatic and restored texts (incl. glosses on text) on the three cauldrons of poesy, Coire Goiriath, Coire Érmai, Coire Soḟis from MS TCD H 3. 18 with Engl. transl. and notes. Begins with Moí coire coir Goiriath. Discussion of linguistic dating and metrics. Includes index of names and principal notes. Appendix with ed. of text on the hazels of Segais (cuill na Segsa) from MS NLI G 10.

Add. et corr. in Ériu 35 (1984), pp. 189-191.

2622.
Wagner (H.): A syntactical feature of archaic Old Irish poetry.
In ZCP 39 (1982), pp. 78–82.
ad Caldron of Poesy, line 2 roní Dia dam a dūilib demrib (as ed. by P. L. Henry, StC 14-15 (1979–1980), pp. 114-128). Argues that in Early Old Irish a preposed genitive immediately following a preposition could be made to agree in case with its noun.

Calendar of Willibrord

1367.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí), Fanning (Thomas) (app. auth.): Rath Melsigi, Willibrord, and the earliest Echternach manuscripts.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 17–49.
Argues that the earliest Echternach codices were strongly influenced by Irish scribal tradition. Rath Melsigi (identified as Clonmelsh, Co. Carlow), mentioned by Bede, is suggested as training ground for Willibrord’s mission to Frisia. Uuictberct, an Anglo-Saxon scholar, is identified with Ichtbricht on the witness list of Cáin Adomnáin. Posits a reference to Druim Léas (Drumlease, Co. Leitrim) in the Calendar of Willibrord. Incl. app. ‘Some field monuments in the townlands of Clonmelsh and Garryhundon, Co. Carlow’, pp. 43-49 by Thomas Fanning. Cf. K. Murphy, in Peritia 8 (1994), p. 169.
Murphy (K.) (ref.)

Cambrai Homily

493.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): On the semantics of Irish words derived from IE *gher- ‘hot’.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 273–290.
[1.] fo-geir and guirid (goirid) in the Cambrai Homily and the Glosses; [2.] Legal contexts [gor, ingor, goire]; [3.] DIL's 1 gor; [4.] Further illustrative verbal citations; [5.] goirt, gortae, gortach, gortaigid and gortugud; [6.] grís and derivatives; [7.] Modern Irish evidence.
501.
Ní Chatháin (Próinséas): A reading in the Cambrai Homily.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 417–417.
ad MS Cambrai, Bibliothèque Municipale 679, fol. 38a17 (Thes. ii 247.2). Reading cé rucésa amended to cení césa (‘although he does not endure’) in text on white martyrdom (`issí in bánmartre [. . .]').
2446.
Siewers (Alfred K.): The bluest-greyest-greenest eye: colours of martyrdom and colours of the winds as iconographic landscape.
In CMCS 50 (Winter 2005), pp. 31–66.
Examines the cosmological background to the concept of glasmartre, and discusses its meaning within the wider Christian literary context.
2836.
Sterckx (Claude): Le roi blanc, le roi rouge et le roi bleu.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 837–846.
Discusses the three forms of martyrdom illustrated in the Cambrai Homily, arguing that their colours white, red and blue correspond to similar chromatic representations of Dumézilian Indo-European trifunctional symbolism in ancient India and Iran. In addition, finds further evidence for this interpretation in a passage from the Leinster Bórama.
4781.
Griffith (Aaron): *-n(C)s in Celtic.
In Sprache 45/1-2 (2005), pp. 44–67.
Revises the facts exposed in K. McCone, Towards a relative chronology of ancient and medieval Celtic sound change, 1996, pp. 61 ff. and argues in favour of the following sequence of rules: 1) analogical replacement of thematic accusative plural ending *-ons by *-ōns, 2) raising of *ō, *ē > *ū, *ı̄, and 3) post-Common Celtic loss of *n before *(C)s.

Appendix: On the reading of Cambrai ar feda.

6978.
Sterckx (Claude): The three Irish martyrdoms.
In JIES 9/3-4 (Fall/Winter 1981), pp. 329–332.
ad Thes. ii, 246-247 (Cambray Homily).
781.
Ó Néill (Pádraig P.): The background to the Cambrai Homily.
In Ériu 32 (1981), pp. 137–147.
[1.] Structure; [2.] Sources; [3.] Circumstances of composition.

Cambrensis, Giraldus

391.
Stewart (James): Gleann na nGealt: a twelfth-century Latin account.
In Celtica 17 (1985), pp. 105–111.
As (probably) described in Topographia Hiberniae by Giraldus Cambrensis.

Campbell, Duncan

3717.
Gillies (William): The Gaelic poems of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy (I).
In ScoGS 13/1 (Autumn 1978), pp. 18–45.
Poems by Donnchadh Caimbeul of Glenorchy: 1. Teachtaire cuireas i gcéin (4 qq.); 2. Fada ó mhalluigh Dia na mná (6 qq.); 3. Atá amhghar fá na mnáibh (6 qq.); 4. Uch, is mise an giolla mór (4 qq.). Transcribed and restored form the Book of the Dean of Lismore; with English translation and notes.

[Continued in ScoGS 13/2 (Summer, 1981), pp. 263-288].

3730.
Gillies (William): The Gaelic Poems of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy (II).
In ScoGS 13/2 (Summer 1981), pp. 263–288.
V. Cé don Phléid as ceann uidhe (23 qq.); VI. Mairg ó ndeachaidh a léim lúidh (13 qq.). Transcribed and restored form the Book of the Dean of Lismore; with English translation and notes.

[Continued from ScoGS 13/1 (Autumn, 1978), pp. 18-45]; [Continued in ScoGS 14/1 (Winter 1983), pp. 59–82].

4262.
Gillies (William): The Gaelic Poems of Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy (III).
In ScoGS 14/1 (Winter 1983), pp. 59–82.
VII. Bod bríoghmhor atá ag Donncha (8 qq.); VIII. A shagairt na hamshóige (6 qq.); IX. Créad dá ndearnadh Domhnall Donn (7 qq.). Transcribed and restored form the Book of the Dean of Lismore; with English translation and notes.

[Continued from ScoGS 13/2 (Summer, 1981), pp. 263-288].

6088.
Flahive (Joseph J.): Duncan Campbell: a Scottish Gaelic bard in eighteenth century Cork.
In JCHAS 113 (2008), pp. 80–89.
al. Donnchadh Caimbeul. Includes an edition of Còirneal Sheumas, Chùil Dhaothail, in praise of Colonel James Fraser; with English translation and notes.

Campbell, Robert, Argyll’s Forester in Cowal

4372.
Ó Baoill (Colm): Robert Campbell, Forsair Choire an t-Sìth.
In ScoGS 23 (2007), pp. 57–84.
On the identification of Robert Campbell, author of the laudatory poem to Edward Lhuyd in the preface to Archaeologia Britannica; includes text from TCD H 5. 20 and English translation.

Campion, Edmund

1553.
Dumville (David N.): An episode in Edmund Campion’s Historie of Ireland.
In Éigse 16/2 (Geimhreadh 1975), pp. 131–132.
On St. Peter battling for the soul of an Irish galloglass.

Caogad

3711.
Thomson (R. L.): The language of the Caogad (1659).
In ScoGS 12/2 (Autumn 1976), pp. 143–182.
Describes the language of the Gaelic version of the first fifty metrical Psalms. In appendix discusses the linguistic aspects of the 1694 revision of the text.

Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire

2713.
Killeen (J. F.): Influence of ballads on Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire?
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 190–199.
Points out similarities with English and Scottish ballads.
4934.
Marren (Julie K.): From bean chaointe to fear léinn: ‘The lament for Art O’Leary’.
In PHCC 13 (1995), pp. 49–53.
4976.
Mac Lochlainn (Alf): Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire: leagan as lámhscríbhinn.
In SHib 12 (1972), pp. 109–119.
11336.
Cullen (L. M.): Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire: the contemporary political context.
In History Ireland 1/4 (Winter 1993), pp. 23–27.
11795.
Nic an Airchinnigh (Méadhbh): Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire: Blood-drinking, Art’s sister and censorship in Father Peter O’Leary’s manuscripts P and Pead.
In PHCC 30 (2011), pp. 175–206.
11696.
Ó Dúshláine (Tadhg): Critique Uí Chorcora ar ‘Chaoine Airt Uí Laoire’.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 591–609.
Criticises some opinions on the Caoineadh received from Daniel Corkery (1878-1964), particularly concerning the meaning of sgoil in the last verse of the poem.
12274.
Cullen (L. M.): The contemporary and later politics of Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoire.
In ECI 8 (1993), pp. 7–38.
1730.
Partridge (Angela): Wild men and wailing women.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 25–37.

Caoineadh Dhiarmada mhic Eoghain Mhic Cárthaigh

1730.
Partridge (Angela): Wild men and wailing women.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 25–37.

Caoineadh na Maighdine

1730.
Partridge (Angela): Wild men and wailing women.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 25–37.

Carbine Bridge

2282.
Ó Cearbhaill (Pádraig): Áth na gCarbad.
In Ainm 4 (1989–1990), pp. 194–199.
Carbine Bridge, Co. Tipperary.

Carmen Paschale

1607.
Wright (Neil): The Hisperica famina and Caelius Sedulius.
In CMCS 4 (Winter 1982), pp. 61–76.
Identifies literary borrowings in the B text of Hisperica famina from the Carmen Paschale of Caelius Sedulius.

Carmichael, Alexander

11013.
Stiùbhart (Domhnall Uilleam): Màiri Bhreac agus gàidsear an fhéilidh: Màiri Stiùbhart, Alasdair MacGilleMhìcheil, na thug i seachad, agus na rinn e leis.
In ScoGS 24 (2008), pp. 551–571.

Carmina Gadelica

11013.
Stiùbhart (Domhnall Uilleam): Màiri Bhreac agus gàidsear an fhéilidh: Màiri Stiùbhart, Alasdair MacGilleMhìcheil, na thug i seachad, agus na rinn e leis.
In ScoGS 24 (2008), pp. 551–571.

Catechesis Celtica

2240.
Wright (Charles D.): The Irish ‘enumerative style’ in Old English homiletic literature, especially Vercelli Homily IX.
In CMCS 18 (Winter 1989), pp. 27–74.
Argues that Old English homilists adapted numerical motifs from Old Irish and Hiberno-Latin models.
494.
McNamara (Martin): The Irish affiliations of the Catechesis Celtica.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 291–334.
1. Designation; 2. Contents of Vatican Codex Reginensis Latinus 49; 3. History of research; 4. Catechesis Celtica and Irish biblical text; 5. Catechesis Celtica and Irish exegetical tradition; 6. The Catechesis Celtica and Irish homiletic tradition; 7. Catechesis homilies on Matthew and the Liber questionum in euangeliis; 8. Use in the Catechesis Celtica of apocrypha and rare Latin texts; 9. Concepts and phrases common to Catechesis and Irish texts; 10. Conclusion.

Catechismus (Stapleton)

6328.
O’Reilly (Mary): Seventeenth-century Irish cathechisms: European or not?
In ArH 50 (1996), pp. 102–112.

Cath Airtig

2497.
Bhreathnach (Edel): Tales of Connacht: Cath Airtig, Táin bó Flidhais, Cath Leitreach Ruibhe, and Cath Cumair.
In CMCS 45 (Summer 2003), pp. 21–42.
Examines the textual tradition of these four tales (without edition or translation) and argues that they belong to one narrative centered around the history of Connacht intended for a local learned audience.

Cath Almaine

2525.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Sound and sense in Cath Almaine.
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 41–47.
Discusses the value bestowed upon the spoken word.
2037.
Ó Riain (Pádraig) (ed.): Cath Almaine.
MMIS, 25. Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978. xxxix + 86 pp.
Edited from MS Brussels 5301-20, normalized, with diplomatic text; also diplomatic edition of the texts in MSS YBL and RIA 23 E 29 (F); with notes and vocabulary.
614.
Davies (Morgan T.): Kings and clerics in some Leinster sagas.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 45–66.
Exemplified chiefly by Cath Dúin Bolg and Cath Almaine, including anecdotes from Fragmentary annals of Ireland.

Cath Bearna Chroise Brighde

2615.
Williams (N. J. A.): Cath Bearna Chroise Brighde.
In ZCP 38 (1981), pp. 269–337.
Edition of two amalgamated poems concerning the potato, from Egerton 165. With English translation and textual notes.

Cath Cairn Chonaill

1801.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): LL and the date of the reviser of LU.
In Éigse 20 (1984), pp. 212–225.
1. A note on the Book of Leinster (LL). 2. A pointer to LU-matter in LL. 3. Táin bó Flidais. 4. Cath Cairn Chonaill. 5. Genemain Áeda Sláine. 6. The poem Atchíu fer find firfes cles.

Cath Catharda

12480.
Bartnik (Agnieszka): Cath Catharda: Irlandzka wersja Bellum civile Marka Anneusza Lukana? Wprowadzenie do tematu.
In 21/2 (2011), pp. 27–40.
[(In Polish:) Cath Catharda: an Irish version of Lucan’s Bellum civile? An introduction to the issue].

Cath Catharda, In

2982.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): ‘Style de traduction’: les traductions celtiques de textes historiques.
In RHT 24 (1994), pp. 375–391.
Part II (pp. 381-387) deals with the influence of the vernacular epic style on the Irish adaptations of latin texts. Appendix contains a study of the opening section of the Irish version of Historia Brittonum.
1987.
Harris (John R.): The Middle Irish adaptation of Lucan’s Bellum Civile: an exercise in creative conventionality.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 103–128.

Cath Chluana Tarbh

4149.
Ní Úrdail (Meidhbhín): Some observations on the ‘Dublin Annals of Innisfallen’.
In Ériu 57 (2007), pp. 133–153.
Discusses the sources and compilatory process of two substantial entries concerning the O’Briens of Thomond (s.a. 1014 and 1306) which draw upon Cath Chluana Tarbh and Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh respectively.
2882.
Ní Úrdail (Meidhbhín): Seachadadh Cath Cluana Tarbh sna lámhscríbhinní.
In LCC 34 (2004), pp. 179–215.
2140.
Ní Úrdail (Meidhbhín): Cath Chluana Tarbh.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 183–198.
Summary of literary background and MS tradition.

Cath Cinn Abrad

8064.
O Daly (Máirín) (ed.): Cath Maige Mucrama. The Battle of Mag Mucrama / edited by Máirín O Daly.
ITS, 50. London: Irish Texts Society, 1975. viii + 157 pp.
[1.] Cath Maige Mucrama, from LL; [2.] Scéla Éogain, from Laud Misc. 610; [3.] Scéla Moṡauluim, from Laud Misc. 610; [4.] Cath Cinn Abrad from Lecan. With English translation and notes. Appendix: Text of Cath Maige Mucrama from NLI G 7.

Rev. by
J. E. Caerwyn Williams, in StC 14-15 (1979-1980), pp. 451-455.

Cath Cluana Tarbh

11980.
Ní Úrdail (Meidhbhín) (ed.): Cath Cluana Tarbh. The Battle of Clontarf / edited by Meidhbhín Ní Úrdail.
ITS, 64. London: Irish Texts Society, 2011. x + 310 pp.
Edition of the ‘core narrative’ based on Egerton 106 (with variants from RIA 23 K 37); with English translation and textual notes.
Appendix I: Semi-diplomatic editions (The core narrative from Ó Riain MS 1; Version 2A from Ferriter MS 25; Version 2B from RIA MS 246 (24 C 14); Version 2C from RIA MS 211 (23 G 20); Version 2D from RIA MS 204 (E vi 3)). Appendix II: Manuscript sources [information on 182 individual texts].

Cath Cumair

2497.
Bhreathnach (Edel): Tales of Connacht: Cath Airtig, Táin bó Flidhais, Cath Leitreach Ruibhe, and Cath Cumair.
In CMCS 45 (Summer 2003), pp. 21–42.
Examines the textual tradition of these four tales (without edition or translation) and argues that they belong to one narrative centered around the history of Connacht intended for a local learned audience.

Cath Dúin Bolg

614.
Davies (Morgan T.): Kings and clerics in some Leinster sagas.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 45–66.
Exemplified chiefly by Cath Dúin Bolg and Cath Almaine, including anecdotes from Fragmentary annals of Ireland.

Cath Fhochairte Brighite

7284.
Duffy (Seán): The Gaelic account of the Bruce invasion Cath Fhochairte Brighite: medieval romance or modern forgery?
In SAM 13/1 (1988), pp. 59–121.
Assesses the reliability of this text as an historical source.

Cath Fionntrágha

6251.
de Brún (Pádraig): Miscellanea: 2. An early reference to the legend of Gleann na nGealt.
In JKAHS 6 (1973), pp. 197–199.
Discusses a place name in West Kerry.
5846.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Cath Fionntrágha.
In LCC 25 (1995), pp. 128–143.
1990.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): The historical context of Cath Fionntrágha.
In Éigse 28 (1995), pp. 138–155.
Argues that CF was composed in Connacht, the Fionntrágha alluded to being Tráigh Eothaile in Co. Sligo, and that the narrative reflects Irish politics (esp. those concerning the Ó Domhnaill lords and their Clann Suibhne mercenaries) contemporary with its earliest MS witness.

Cath Leitreach Ruibhe

2497.
Bhreathnach (Edel): Tales of Connacht: Cath Airtig, Táin bó Flidhais, Cath Leitreach Ruibhe, and Cath Cumair.
In CMCS 45 (Summer 2003), pp. 21–42.
Examines the textual tradition of these four tales (without edition or translation) and argues that they belong to one narrative centered around the history of Connacht intended for a local learned audience.

Cath Maige Mucrama

2767.
Murray (Kevin): A reading from Scéla Moṡauluim.
In ZCP 53 (2003), pp. 198–201.
ad lines 686-693 (as ed. by Maureen O Daly, 1975). Argues that tigernmas is to be taken as a proper name.
5642.
Koch (John T.): A swallowed onomastic tale in Cath Maige Mucrama?
In Ildánach ildírech [FS Mac Cana] (1999), pp. 63–80.
6454.
McCone (Kim), Ó Fiannachta (Pádraig): Scéalaíocht ár sinsear.
Dán agus tallann, 3. Maigh Nuad: An Sagart, 1992. 142 pp.
Contains Cath Maige Mucrama, Aided Chonchobuir, Genemain Cormaic ua Cuinn, Echtra mac Echdach Mugmedóin, Togail bruidne Da Derga, Aided Diarmata meic Fergusa Cerbeóil, Longes mac nUislenn, Echtra Fergusa maic Léti and Bethu Phátraic in Modern Irish translation.

Rev. by
A. J. Hughes, in SAM 15/2 (1993), p. 274.
Máirín Ní Dhonnchadha, in Comhar 51/10 (Oct., 1992), pp. 27-28.
Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, in Éigse 28 (1994-1995), pp. 236-239.
8943.
Boll (Sheila): Structural symmetry and the representation of kinship in mediaeval Gaelic narrative literature: Cath Maige Mucrama and Scéla muicce Meic Dáthó.
In JCS 5 (2005), pp. 127–139.
8064.
O Daly (Máirín) (ed.): Cath Maige Mucrama. The Battle of Mag Mucrama / edited by Máirín O Daly.
ITS, 50. London: Irish Texts Society, 1975. viii + 157 pp.
[1.] Cath Maige Mucrama, from LL; [2.] Scéla Éogain, from Laud Misc. 610; [3.] Scéla Moṡauluim, from Laud Misc. 610; [4.] Cath Cinn Abrad from Lecan. With English translation and notes. Appendix: Text of Cath Maige Mucrama from NLI G 7.

Rev. by
J. E. Caerwyn Williams, in StC 14-15 (1979-1980), pp. 451-455.
2044.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The theme of lommrad in Cath Maige Mucrama.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 211–224.

Cath Maige Rath

2326.
Mooney (B[ernard J.]): BUPNS reprints 5: Hanna on Magh Rath.
In Ainm 7 (1996), pp. 144–147.
Repr. from BUPNS 1/2 (Autumn 1952), pp. 26-30 [also repr. as BUPNS 1 (1955), pp. 11-14].
11424.
Phillips (Veronica): Exile and family in medieval Irish literature.
In Quaestio insularis 11 (2010), pp. 36–53.
4941.
Wong (Donna): Christianity and the Ulster Cycle in Cath Maige Rath.
In PHCC 14 (1997), pp. 14–23.

Cath Maige Tuired

2042.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (1-24).
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 183–209.
9814.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Cath Maige Tuired as exemplary myth.
In Folia Gadelica [Breatnach essays] (1983), pp. 1–19.
1756.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (24-120).
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 1–35.
Continued from Éigse 18 (1981), pp. 183-209.
3233.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): The sister’s son in early Irish literature.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 128–160.
On the significance of the maternal kindred in early Irish literature, as exemplified by Christ’s relationship with the Jews, Bres’s with the Túatha Dé Danann and Cú Chulainn’s with Conchobar.
2025.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Oidheadh Chloinne Tuireann agus Cath Maige Tuired: dhá shampla de mhiotas eiseamláireach.
In Éigse 32 (2000), pp. 35–46.
Suggests that OCT may be interpreted as an edifying literary work that conveys, in the form of exemplary myth, the negative results of political discord in late medieval Ireland; contrast with CMT offers support for this view.

Paper read at the Gerard Murphy Commemorative Conference, 4 December 1999.

12363.
Breatnach (Liam): The lord’s share in the profits of justice and a passage in Cath Maige Tuired.
In Celtica 27 (2013), pp. 1–17.
Offers a new interpretation of §38 (as ed. by E. A. Gray) based on an analysis of the legal context of this passage, and shows that the characterization of Bres as an oppressive ruler is supported by his unlawful accumulation of clientship dues.
3501.
Sayers (William): Bargaining for the life of Bres in Cath Maige Tuired.
In BBCS 34 (1987), pp. 26–40.
12373.
Pettit (Edward): Míach’s healing of Núadu in Cath Maige Tuired.
In Celtica 27 (2013), pp. 158–171.
3629.
Carey (John): Myth and mythography in Cath Maige Tuired.
In StC 24–25 (1989–1990), pp. 53–69.
Appendix: The Morrígan’s prophecy of the end of the world; diplomatic and normalised text from MS Harley 5280, with English translation.
4208.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Irish myths and legends.
In SCF 2 (2005), pp. 11–26.
Considers various aspects of early Irish narrative, such as kingship, kinship and the threefold death.
4555.
Sergent (Bernard): La mort de Karṇa et celle de Balor.
In Ollodagos 8/2 (1995), pp. 211–237.
2758.
Blažek (Václav): Balor: ‘the blind-eyed’?
In ZCP 52 (2001), pp. 129–133.
Identifies OIr. Balor (< *bhol-Hokwlo- ‘blind(ing) eyed’) with Óðinn’s eptihet ON bileygr ‘lame-eyed’.
4609.
Hily (Gaël): Le trio Goibne, Lug et Balor: un héritage de la tradition cosmogonique indo-européenne.
In ÉtC 36 (2008), pp. 119–133.
6964.
O’Brien (Steven): Indo-European eschatology: a model.
In JIES 4/4 (Winter 1976), pp. 295–320.
6997.
Sayers (William): Cerrce, an archaic epithet of the Dagda, Cernunnos and Conall Cernach.
In JIES 16/3-4 (Fall/Winter 1988), pp. 341–364.
ad Cath Maige Tuired §93 (as ed. by E. A. Gray, 1982). Discusses the various epithets of the Dagda, focusing on Cerrce and its etymology.
7048.
Bek-Pedersen (Karen): Oppositions and cooperations in the Baldr myth, with Irish and Welsh parallels.
In JIES 34/1-2 (Spring/Summer 2006), pp. 5–26.
Searches for parallels in Cath Maige Tuired.
6163.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Pagan survivals: the evidence of early Irish narrative.
In Die Kirche im Frühmittelalter (1984), pp. 291–307.
Exemplified with reference to a passage from Cath Maige Tuired.
3644.
Isaac (G. R.): The end of the world in Welsh and Irish: a common disaster.
In StC 28 (1994), pp. 173–174.
ad Cath Maige Tuired line 832 (as ed. by E. A. Gray 1982).
1775.
Gray (Elizabeth A.): Cath Maige Tuired: myth and structure (84-93, 120-167).
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 230–262.
Continued from Éigse 19 (1982), pp. 1-35.
8067.
Gray (Elizabeth A.) (ed.): Cath Maige Tuired. The second battle of Mag Tuired / edited by Elizabeth A. Gray.
ITS, 52. London: Irish Texts Society, 1982. vi + 142 pp.
From Harley 5280; diplomatic text, with English translation and notes.

Rev. by
F. Kelly, in Celtica 17 (1985), pp. 185-186.
E. G. Quin, in CMCS 9 (Summer, 1985), pp. 99-101.
5518.
Lévêque (Pierre): La dépendance dans la structure trifonctionnelle indo-européenne.
In DHA 10 (1984), pp. 51–74.
8843.
Blustein (Rebecca): Poets and pillars in Cath Maige Tuired.
In Myth in Celtic literature (2007), pp. 22–38.

Cath Maighe Léna

6076.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Cath Maighe Léana and some West Munster placenames.
In JCHAS 110 (2005), pp. 97–112.
Discusses 26 place names in the Killarney-Kenmare area. Appendix: [Additional place-name material in Mícheál] Ó Longáin’s recension.

Cath Maighe Rath

12730.
Ó Riain (Gordon): Varia I: 1. Two quatrains in Cath Maighe Rath.
In Ériu 63 (2013), pp. 145–151.

Cath Maighe Tuireadh

4715.
Sterckx (Claude): Quand Lugh devient-il roi?
In Ollodagos 18/2 (2004), pp. 301–305.
ad §75 of Cath Maige Tuired (as ed. by Elizabeth A. Gray 1982). Criticises E. A Gray’s and Ch.-J. Guyonvarch’s translation of this section, and argues this is caused by the false assumption that Lug remains as king of the Túatha Dé Danann after the period of thirteen days for which he took Núada’s place.

Cath Muighe Tuireadh

8162.
Radner (Joan N.): The combat of Lug and Balor: discourses of power in Irish myth and folktale.
In OT 7/1 (1992), pp. 143–149.

Cath Ruis na Ríg

2711.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Cath Ruis na Ríg and twelfth century literary and oral tradition.
In ZCP 44 (1991), pp. 128–153.
Examines the early (or ‘Book of Leinster’) and modern Irish versions of Cath Ruis na Ríg, and argues that the former is an entirely new version of an existing tale from which the superior latter version is derived. It is suggested that the author’s (an LL compiler) intention in reworking that archetype was to bestow greater prominence upon Conall Cernach.
2816.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Infixed and independent pronouns in the LL text of Táin bó Cúailnge.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 494–515.
Investigates the decline of the infixed pronoun and the use of non-historical pronominal forms in Middle Irish, using as a case study two texts written in the late 12th century, namely Cath Ruis na Ríg and Táin bó Cúailnge (recension II). Includes a collection of infixed and independent pronouns.
5119.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): The language of some late middle Irish texts in the Book of Leinster.
In SHib 26 (1991–1992), pp. 167–216.
Studies the orthography, language and style of Táin bó Cúailnge recension II and Cath Ruis na Ríg, with the aim of discussing their date of composition and authorship.
2202.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Die Gedichte in Cath Ruis na Ríg.
In 3. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (2004), pp. 211–226.
9263.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Leaganacha de Cath Ruis na Ríg: an deilbhíocht idir 1100 agus 1650.
In Léann lámhscríbhínní Lobháin (2007), pp. 168–197.
11661.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): On the date of the Middle Irish recension II Táin bó Cúailnge.
Quiggin memorial lectures, 11. Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 2010. 33 pp.
11913.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): On textual correspondences in early Irish heroic tales.
In NACCS 1 (1988), pp. 343–355.
Discusses textual correspondences in Middle Irish Ulster tales, with particular reference to the Book of Leinster and Edinburgh versions of Cath Ruis na Ríg.
2690.
Mac Gearailt (Uáitéar): Zum Irischen des 12. Jahrhunderts.
In ZCP 43 (1989), pp. 11–52.
Offers an exhaustive linguistic analysis of the Middle Irish text Cath Ruis na Ríg, contained in the Book of Leinster. Appendix contains a complete collection of verbal forms.

Cath Tarbga

1820.
Mac Niocaill (Gearóid): The background of the Battle of Tarbga.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 133–140.
Includes text and translation of text on the Battle of Tarbga (set in early 9th c.), beg. Uata m Dadlaich dano, Fogartach mac Diarmata rig Corcor Tri [. . .], embedded in genealogical tract on the Uí Diarmada. Edited from MS RIA 23 P 2 (Bk of Lecan) with corrections and substantive variants from MS RIA 23 P 12 (Bk of Ballymote).

Catha Maige Tuired

1065.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Three notes on Cath Maige Tuired.
In Ériu 40 (1989), pp. 61–68.
1. An unnecessary emendation (vs. W. Stokes's emendation of snidhfed to sn[a]idh[m]fed, in RC 12 (1891), pp. 306-08 (§14), reproduced in E. A. Gray, Cath Maige Tuired (1982); also discussion of the theme of womenfolk’s intervention in political affairs); 2. OIr. -tochus (Interprets MS toc̄sa (§67) as tochus, prototonic fut. 1 sg. of do-cing ‘steps, strides forward; advances, comes’); 3. A redactorial intrusion [in §69].
Gray (E. A.) (ref.), Stokes (W.) (ref.)

Cathcharpat Serda

1827.
O’Rahilly (Cecile): Cathcharpat Serda.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 194–202.
From the Book of Leinster 189a3-189b36. With English translation and notes. Includes some discussion and rhythmical analysis of ‘identification scenes’.

Cathréim Cellaig

12846.
Ó Con Cheanainn (Tomás): Iasacht as Cathréim Cellaig in Dindshenchas Érenn.

Catṡlechta

3797.
Murray (Kevin): Catṡlechta and other medieval legal material relating to cats.
In Celtica 25 (2007), pp. 143–159.
Edits and translates the surviving fragments of cat law from the Senchas már and elsewhere.

Ceasacht Inghine Guile

1138.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Early modern Irish prose reconsidered: the case of Ceasacht Inghine Guile.
In Ériu 42 (1991), pp. 119–138.
Suggests that CIG represents a reworking of Erchoitmed Ingine Gulide by Brian Ó Gnímh some time after 1567, commemorating the military and political achievements of the MacDonnells of Antrim following the Battle of Glenshesk (1565), and commenting on the shared fate and status of patron and ollamh. Cf. C. Breatnach, in Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 37-60, and 43 (1992), pp. 159-176.
Breatnach (C.) (ref.)
2032.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): The transmission of Ceasacht inghine Guile: some observations.
In Éigse 32 (2000), pp. 138–145.
Text of the episode of the seduction of Guiles’s daughter, edited from RIA MS 23 M 27, with English translation (source of the anecdote supplied by D. Ó Cróinín, in Éigse 31 (1991), p. 36).
1141.
Breatnach (Caoimhín): Patronage, politics and prose: Ceasacht Inghine Guile, Sgéala muice Meic Dha Thó, Oidheadh Chuinn Chéadchathaigh.
Maynooth monographs, 5. Maynooth: An Sagart, 1996. viii + 180 pp.
Edition with transl. and notes of three tales from MSS RIA 24 P 12, NLI G 448, and TCD H 6. 8. Contains section on language of texts (pp. 142-67).

Rev. by
Tomás Ó Concheanainn, in CMCS 32 (Winter 1996), p. 122.
Máirín Ní Dhonnchadha, in Éigse 30 (1997), pp. 216-229.

Céilidhe Iosgaide Léithe

1601.
Gillies (William): Arthur in Gaelic tradition. Part II: Romances and learned lore.
In CMCS 3 (Summer 1982), pp. 41–75.
Discusses early modern Gaelic prose romances, e.g. Lorgaireacht an tSoidhigh Naomhtha, Céilidhe Iosgaide Léithe, Eachtra Mhelóra agus Orlando, Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil, Eachtra Mhacaoimh an Iolair, Caithréim Chonghail Chláiringnigh, Eachtra an Amadáin Mhóir; some discussion of associations with Arthur in local legend.

For part I, see CMCS 2 (Winter 1981), pp. 47-72.

Céitinn, Séathrún

5165.
Ó Murchú (Máirtín): Gnéithe de chomhréir téacsa.
In SHib 31 (2000–2001), pp. 211–219.
Discusses line 11 (dar ndóigh níorbh áit don táinse in oscaill Bhríde) of Keating’s Óm sceól ar ardmhagh Fáil ní chodlaim oíche (as ed. by P. de Brún et al. 1971; see BILL III: 5814).
10251.
Ó Doibhlin (Breandán): Athléamh ar Trí bhiorgha an bháis.
In Bliainiris 6 (2006), pp. 203–229.
1735.
Ó Dúshláine (Tadhg): Nóta ar cheapadóireacht an Chéitinnigh.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 87–92.
Discusses the metaphor of chess applied to human existence, as used by Keating.

Cenn Fáelad

5157.
Mac Cába (Éanna): Ceann Fhaoladh sapiens, inchinn an dearmaid, agus cluiche an léinn.
In SHib 31 (2000–2001), pp. 53–69.
Discusses the Mellbretha; with Irish translation of the opening passage in Egerton 88 and of the fragment from TCD MS H 4. 22.

Ces Ulad

3735.
Salberg (Trond Kruke): Le lien entre la faiblesse des Ulstériens (A et B) et les lais du cycle de Lanval: son importance pour la relation entre les lais et pour le rapport entre les deux récits irlandais.
In ZrP 105/5-6 (1989), pp. 445–471.

Cétáin in braith

8918.
McLaughlin (Róisín): A Latin-Irish text on fasting in the Leabhar Breac.
In Ériu 60 (2010), pp. 37–80.
Entitled Cétáin in braith. Edition, with English translation and textual notes, and a discussion of its structure and sources.

Cethairṡlicht athgabálae

8542.
Smith (Amy): A note on Cethairṡlicht athgabálae.
In Celtica 26 (2010), pp. 161–170.
Proposes that the ‘four divisions’ in title of this tract refer to the four different lengths of stay used in the procedure of distraint.
10608.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The early Irish vocabulary of mills and milling.
In Studies on early Ireland [Duignan essays] (1982), pp. 13–19.
Edits a passage on the eight parts of a mill from the tract De ceithri slichtaib athgabála, beg. Im ocht mbullu ara-fognat muilenn (CIH ii 374.19-20, etc.); with English translation, textual notes and a vocabulary list.
9856.
Jaski (Bart): Opsporing verzocht! Conn van de Honderd Verdragen en het raadsel van de opgeloste wettekst.
In Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre [FS Strien-Gerritsen] (2003), pp. 111–128.
[(In Dutch:) Information wanted! Conn of the Hundred Treaties and the riddle of the lost wisdom text].

Discusses the relationship between the pseudo-historical introduction of Cethairṡlicht athgabálae and its Old-Irish glosses, Aided Chon Roí, Echtra Fergusa meic Leiti, and Aided Chuind Chétchathaig.
11233.
Watkins (Calvert): The milk of the dawn cows revisited.
In East and West (2009), pp. 225–239.
Discusses the semantic and morphological evolution of OIr. fír ‘milk’ and fáir ‘dawn’ from PIE *weh1r- ‘water’.
10548.
McLeod (Neil): Fergus mac Léti and the law.
In Ériu 61 (2011), pp. 1–28.
Studies the saga of Fergus mac Léti, focusing on the version in the opening two sections of Cethairṡlicht athgabálae, and argues that §1 was composed in strict verse together with §2 with the purpose of illustrating the law of distraint. Includes the restored text and English translation of §1 of this version and of §2 of the Old Irish commentary version (which is also argued to be composed in verse), and supplies an additional section of the commentary version omitted in D. A. Binchy's edition in Ériu 16 (1952), pp. 33-48 (discussion in Appendix).
11274.
Borsje (Jacqueline): Love magic in medieval Irish penitentials, law and literature: a dynamic perspective.
In SNe 84 (2012), pp. 6–23.
Analyses early medieval Irish descriptions of beliefs associated to witchcraft, using an episode from Bethu Brigte as a case-study.
254.
Binchy (D. A.): Distraint in Irish law.
In Celtica 10 (1973), pp. 22–71.
On athgabáil, etc. in Cethairṡlicht athgabálae, etc.

Cethri prímchenéla Dáil Riata

4353.
Dumville (David N.): Cethri prímchenéla Dáil Riata.
In ScoGS 20 (2000), pp. 170–191.
A discussion of this genealogical treatise; includes transcripts from the six extant manuscript witnesses.

Chréad í suim an rachta go hiomslán

421.
de Brún (Pádraig): Dhá bhlogh de theagasc Críostaí: ó ré Éilíse I (?).
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 55–58.
Ed. from MS London, PROL SP 63/207/6. I, beg. Créad í in cead aithne; II, beg. Chréad í suim an rachta go hiomslán. Dated to 1600 (?) and preserved by Dr Meredith Hanmer (†1604).

Chronicle of Ireland

12317.
Flechner (Roy): The Chronicle of Ireland: then and now.
In EME 21/4 (Nov. 2013), pp. 422–454.

Chronicle of Marianus Scotus

1298.
Byrne (Francis John): Onomastica 2: Na Renna.
In Peritia 1 (1982), p. 267.
ad Onom. Goed. 388, 580. Argues that na Renna (gen. pl. na Rend, inna Renn) mentioned in the Annals of Inisfallen and the Chronicle of Marianus Scotus is to be identified as the Rhinns of Galloway; Dún Reichet (= Dunraigit) is identified as belonging to this area.

Chronicles (Holinshed’s)

2056.
Harrison (Alan): The Shower of Hell.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 304.
Etymology of Ir. ceithearn.

Chronicum Scotorum

12317.
Flechner (Roy): The Chronicle of Ireland: then and now.
In EME 21/4 (Nov. 2013), pp. 422–454.
8315.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): A reconsideration of some place-names from Chronicum Scotorum.
In Ainm 9 (2008), pp. 11–33.
3382.
Mc Carthy (Daniel): The chronology of St. Brigit of Kildare.
In Peritia 14 (2000), pp. 255–281.
Offers a critical, chronological and textual analysis of all annalistic entries on the life of St. Brigit of Kildare, and argues that Annals of Tigernach and Chronicon Scotorum preserve the oldest chronology presented originally in the Iona chronicle.

Chuoróc maccu Neth Sémon

1294.
Ó Cróinín (Dáibhí): Mo-Sinnu Moccu Min and the Computus of Bangor.
In Peritia 1 (1982), pp. 281–295.
Edition and translation of a note on an intercalated slip in Würzburg MS M. p. th. f. 61 (incomplete in Thes ii 285). The computus which Mo-Sinnu (ob. 610) ‘learned by heart from a certain learned Greek’, and which Mo-Chuoróc maccu Neth Sémon wrote down, was a computus digitorum (a treatise on finger-reckoning), or Graecorum computus, not a method for reckoning time (viz. the Dionysiac cycle).

Cidh is litear ann

7120.
Ahlqvist (Anders): An Irish text on the letters of the alphabet.
In FS Derolez (1987), pp. 3–16.
From NLI G 3, normalized text with English translation and linguistic and textual commentary; includes photographs.

Cín Droma Snechta

528.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Mongán mac Fiachna and Immram Brain.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 102–142.
[1.] The prose of Cín Droma Snechta; [2.] The contextual affinities of Immram Brain; [3.] The incarnation and the birth of Mongán; [4.] Instances of the wonder-child in insular Celtic tradition. See also P. Mac Cana, in Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 33-52.
Mac Cana (Proinsias) (ref.)

Cín Dromma Scnechta

1757.
Carey (John): The location of the Otherworld in the Irish tradition.
In Éigse 19/1 (1982), pp. 36–43.
Argues that the idea of the overseas Otherworld is not natural to the Irish tradition.

Republ. in The Otherworld voyage in early Irish literature, pp. 113-119.

Cín Dromma Snechtai

634.
Carey (John): On the interrelationships of some Cín Dromma Snechtai texts.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 71–92.
1. The Mongán tales (Argues that all four tales are are the work of a single author: (a) Scél asa mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán; (b) Tucait Baile Mongáin; (c) Compert Mongáín; (d) Scél Mongáin); 2. Tucait Baile Mongáin and Baile Chuinn Chétchathaig [and Baile in Scáil] (Concludes that TBM and Scél asa mberar represent texts in which southern traditions are appropriated by a northern author ); 3. The Imacallam texts, Immram Brain, and the Mongán tales (Immacallam Choluim Chille 7 ind Óclaig and Immacallam in Druad Brain 7 inna Banḟátho Febuil); 4. Echtrae Chonlai and Immram Brain; 5. ‘The Midland group’ (Claims these date from the reign of Fínnechta Fledach mac Dúnchada, perhaps from the years 688-9); 6. Tochmarc Étaíne.

Cín lae Uí Mhealláin

7415.
Nic Cathmhaoil (Máire): Cín lae Uí Mhealláin.
In SAM 21/1 (2006), pp. 35–54.
11685.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Iasachtaí foclóra agus il-leaganacha logainmneacha i ndialanna Uí Chianáin agus Uí Mhealláin: spléachadh tosaigh.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 379–404.
6486.
Dillon (Charles): Cín lae Uí Mhealláin: Friar O Mellan journal.
In Dúiche Néill 10 (1995), pp. 130–207.
Diary of Toirdhealbhach Ó Mealláin (1641-1647). An English translation based on the edition by T. Ó Donnchadha, in AH 3 (1931), pp. 1-61.

Cinaed

1345.
Dumville (David N.): A Pictish or Gaelic ecclesiastic in Mercia?
In ScoGS 21 (2003), pp. 1–8.
Suggests the Abbot Cynað (or Cynath) mentioned in Anglo-Saxon sources may have originally been either a Gael (cf. OIr. Cinaed) or a Pict (cf. Pictish Ciniod, Cinioth).

Cinnlae Amhlaoibh Uí Shúileabháin

8118.
Ó Madagáin (Breandán): Cinnlae Amhlaoibh Uí Shúileabháin: a nature diary?
8117.
Ó Háinle (Cathal): Literary aspects of Cinnlae Amhlaoibh Uí Shúileabháin.
8116.
Ó Drisceoil (Proinsias): Ar scaradh gabhail.
8115.
Ó Tuathaigh (Gearóid): Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin as historical witness: an historiographical perspective.
8119.
Buttimer (Neil): Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin’s writings.
10230.
Ó Drisceoil (Proinsias): Lucht feola daoine d’ithe agus míle milliún aineamh eile.
In Bliainiris 2 (2001), pp. 11–26.

Ciothruadh Mac Fhir Bhisigh

2039.
O’Sullivan (William): Ciothruadh’s Yellow Book of Lecan.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), pp. 177–181.
Cols. 370-400 and 573-958 of MS TCD H 2. 16 are shown to belong to the book named by Ciothruadh Mac Fhir Bhisigh. MS NLI G 4, containing YBL cols. 959-98, also belongs here.

Cis lir fodlai aíre

4718.
McLaughlin (Róisín): Early Irish satire.
Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2008. xi + 300 pp.
Texts include: (Chap. 2) An Old Irish tract on satire [beg. Cis lir fodlai aíre, reconstructed from Book of Ballymote, Book of Uí Maine and NLS Gaelic 1; with English translation, manuscript readings and notes, and including the text of a shorter version found in TCD H 3. 18]; (Chap. 3) The Old Irish heptad on satire [no. 33, beg. A-táat secht cenéla aíre le Féniu; restored text based on Rawl. B 487 and TCD H 3. 18, followed by diplomatic text of the glosses and commentary in Rawl. B 487; with English translation and notes]; (Chap. 4) A miscellany of medieval Irish satires [an edition of the satires cited in Mittelirische Verslehren III (ed. by R. Thurneysen 1891 [Best1, p. 53]); 86 poems, normalized from the six extant witnesses, with linguistic and metrical analysis, manuscript readings, English translation and notes].

Rev. by
G. R. Isaac, in JGAHS 62 (2010), pp. 215-216.
Feargal Ó Béarra, in Béaloideas 77 (2009), pp. 132-134.
Gerald Manning, in SHib 36 (2009-2010), pp. 211-215.
Johan Corthals, in Éigse 37 (2010), pp 174-178.
Simon Rodway, in CMCS 62 (Winter, 2011), pp. 94-97.

Clann Aedhagáin

325.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): The Book of Ballymote.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 15–25.
The three named scribes are Robeartus Mac Sithigh, Solamh Ó Droma, and Maghnus Ó Duibhgeannáin. [1.] The scribal hands; [2.] The distribution of the hands; [3.] The date and background of the manuscript (Baile an Mhóta; Clann Aedhagáin; the north Connacht background; probable date of BB: before end of fourteenth century).

Clann MhaoilRuanaidh

511.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): A page from Mac Fhir Bhisigh’s ‘Genealogies’.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 533–560.
Edition of MS UCD Add. Ir. 14, p. 227, containing Genelach Mec Dhiarmada Mhuighe Luirg with parallel texts from other compilations, and commentary. Appendix on Clann MhaoilRuanaidh.

Clann Ua gCorra

9444.
Mac Mathúna (Séamus): Clann Ua gCorra: the modernised prose and poetic version of Immram curaig Ua Corra.
In Miscellanea Wagner (1997), pp. 71–138.

Clarke, Michael (1750-1847)

5550.
Mac Gabhann (Séamus): Forging identity: Michael Clarke and the hidden Ireland.
In RíM 9/2 (1996), pp. 73–95.

Clerk, Rev. Dr Archibald (1813-1887)

205.
Cheape (Hugh): Etymologies and traditions: a Lochaber minister’s notebook, 1858-1864.
In ScoGS 19 (1999), pp. 66–82.
Presents a selection of words, phrases and verse from a manuscript diary (1858-1864) by the Rev. Dr Archibald Clerk of Kilmallie; includes biographical information on Dr Clerk.

Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib

1185.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Bréifne bias in Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib.
In Ériu 43 (1992), pp. 135–158.
[1.] Manuscript tradition; [2.] Interpolations in D [= MS TCD 1319 (H 2.17)]: The Uí Ruairc material; The Mide material; [3.] How the Cogad came to Bréifne.
1468.
Holm (Poul): Between apathy and antipathy: the Vikings in Irish and Scandinavian history.
In Peritia 8 (1994), pp. 151–169.
On the influence of politics on the historiography of vikings in Ireland. [1.] Finds, collections, and publications: Early nineteenth century; [2.] Scandinavian research, 1870–1970; [3.] Nationalist history 1900–1930; [4.] Criticism and acceptance of Cogadh [= Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib], 1930–60;.
2139.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Einige Bemerkungen zu den Verbalstammbildungen in Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib.
In 1. Deutsches Keltologensymposium (1993), pp. 161–182.
Discusses Middle Irish verbal developments surfacing in CGG.
2822.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Some Middle Irish declensional patterns in Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 615–628.
Discusses examples of Middle Irish innovations in the nominal system, namely the loss of the neuter, the ousting of the dual, the simplification of the case system, and the remodeling of the declensional stems.
11772.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): A neglected account of the battle of Clontarf.
In ZCP 59 (2012), pp. 143–167.
Discusses an Irish text found in MS Rawlinson B 486, with particular reference to its relationship to other accounts of the same event. Includes transcription and English translation.
616.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib and the Annals: a comparison.
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 101–126.
1. Structure of the Cogad; 2. Use of annalistic sources in the Cogad; 3. The Cogad and AU compared; 4. The Cogad and AI compared; 5. The Cogad and the Clonmacnoise-group annals compared; 6. The Cogad and the extant annals compared: a summary; 7. Unique annalistic material in the Cogad.

Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh

5773.
Ó Háinle (Cathal G.): Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh.
In LCC 13 (1982), pp. 76–98.
6065.
Ó Murchadha (Diarmuid): Glaislinn and Inis na hEidnigi.
In JCHAS 109 (2004), pp. 111–118.
Discusses and identifies two Co. Cork place-names occurring in Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh (LL 39538-41).
6074.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Cogadh Gáedhel re Gallaibh and Cork.
In JCHAS 110 (2005), pp. 73–83.
Focuses on the socio-cultural context of its composer.
6994.
Sayers (William): An Irish perspective on Ibn Faḍlān’s description of Rūs funeral ceremonial.
In JIES 16/1-2 (Spring/Summer 1988), pp. 173–181.
ad Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaib §55 (as ed. by J. H. Todd, 1867).
8252.
Sayers (William): Clontarf, and the Irish destinies of Sigurðr digri, Earl of Orkney and Þorsteinn Síðu-Hallsson.
In SS 61/3 (1991), pp. 164–186.
On the adaptation of Irish source material into Njáls saga and other Norse literary works.
3427.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): The date of Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib.
In Peritia 9 (1995), pp. 354–377.
Argues for a date of composition between 1103 and 1113.
3432.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings I: ‘Forty years’ rest’.
In Peritia 10 (1996), p. 224.
ad LL 39513-39515 = Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh §26 (as ed. by J. H. Todd 1867 [Best1, p. 254]).
3434.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Vikings III: Dún Mainne.
In Peritia 10 (1996), p. 273.
ad Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh §29 (as ed. by J. H. Todd 1867 [Best1, p. 254]) and FA2 §341 (as ed. by Joan Newlon Radner 1978).
1598.
Nic Ghiollamhaith (Aoife): Dynastic warfare and historical writing in North Munster, 1276-1350.
In CMCS 2 (Winter 1981), pp. 73–89.
Discusses the political context of Uí Briain propoganda text Caithréim Thoirdhealbhaigh and the influence of Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh upon it; also some discussion of the poems Aonair duit a Bhriain Bhanba attributed to Muireadhach Albanach Ó Dálaigh, and Abair riomh a Éire a ógh.

Cogadh Gáedhel re Gallaibh

12262.
Casey (Denis): A reconsideration of the authorship and transmission of Cogadh Gáedhel re Gallaibh.
In PRIA-C 113 (2013), pp. 139–169.

Cogadh Sagsana nuadh sonn

5126.
Buttimer (Cornelius G.): Cogadh Sagsana nuadh sonn: reporting the American Revolution.
In SHib 28 (1994), pp. 63–101.
Edition from MS RIA 24 C 57 of a text based on a letter published in 1778 in The Freeman’s Journal (also includes source text); with full discussion.

Cogitosus

2597.
Ó Briain (Felim), Mac Donncha (Frederic) (ed.): Brigitana.
In ZCP 36 (1978), pp. 112–137.
Studies the structure and interdependence of the different versions of the Life of St. Brigit. Sections: 1. The relation of Broccán’s Hymn to the Vita Brigitae; 2. The priority of VA (Vita Anonyma) or VC (Vita Cogitosi)?; 3. The conflate nature of VA; 4. Sources of VA; 5. Literary borrowings by Cogitosus; 6. The identity of Cogitosus — The name Toimtenach.

(Ed. by F. M. D. from the unpublished work of F. Ó B.).

3061.
Bray (Dorothy Ann): The image of St. Brigit in the early Irish church.
In ÉtC 24 (1987), pp. 209–215.
Examines the pagan elements in Brigit’s Life.
3127.
Picard (Jean-Michel): Les celticismes des hagiographes irlandais du viie siècle.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 355–373.
Studies the Celtic influence in the language of the following 7th-century Hiberno-Latin hagiological texts: Vita Patricii (Muirchú), Collectanea (Tírechán), Vita Brigitae (Cogitosus) and Vita Columbae (Adomnán).
4626.
Connolly (Seán), Picard (J.-M.): Cogitosus’s Life of Saint Brigit: content and value.
In JRSAI 117 (1987), pp. 5–27.
Discussion and English translation.
8671.
Bray (Dorothy Ann): Ireland’s other apostle: Cogitosus’ St. Brigit.
In CMCS 59 (Summer 2010), pp. 55–70.
1289.
McCone (Kim): Brigit in the seventh century: a saint with three lives?
In Peritia 1 (1982), pp. 107–145.
Incl. analysis of textual relationships between Bethu Brigte, Vita I and Vita II Brigitae.
1288.
Sharpe (Richard): Vitae S. Brigitae: the oldest texts.
In Peritia 1 (1982), pp. 81–106.
Argues that Vita II Brigitae of Cogitosus (otherwise known as Toimtenach) derived directly from Vita I, and that both ultimately depended on the Latin original underlying Bethu Brigte.

Coibnes uisci thairidne

12459.
Doolan (Riona): Reflecting a local economy? Evidence from Coibnes uisci thairidne.
In Medieval Irish law (2013), pp. 41–64.

Coibnes usci thairidne

3247.
Baumgarten (Rolf): The kindred metaphors in Bechbretha and Coibnes usci thairidne.
In Peritia 4 (1985), pp. 307–327.
On the use of the analogy of the four categories of kinship (gelḟine, derbḟine, íarfine, indḟine) applied to three cases of neighbourhood law: I. Bechbretha §§9-11, 18-22; II. Bechbretha §§12-13; III. Coibnes uisci thairidne §§1-3, 8. With linguistic discussion and English translation.

Appendix: ad D. A. Binchy, in Celtica 10 (1973), p. 80 §11 [Aithgabál bech].

Cóic conara fugill

10409.
Archan (Christophe), Lambert (Pierre-Yves) (pref. auth.), Poly (Jean-Pierre) (pref. auth.): Les chemins du jugement. Procédure et science du droit dans l’Irlande médiévale.
Romanité et modernité du droit. Paris: De Boccard, 2007. iii + 469 pp.
A study of the tract Cóic conara fugill. Includes a French translation of versions Rawlinson B 502 (= CIH vi 2200-2203), Egerton 88 (= CIH iv 1280.1-1282.23) and H 3. 18 (= CIH iii 1027.21-1041.38), with notes.
11827.
Bemmer (Jaqueline): Validity and equality in early Irish contract law: dliged and cert in the light of Cóic conara fugill.
In SCF 8 (2011), pp. 5–18.
2805.
Henry (Patrick L.): A note on the Brehon Law tracts of procedure and status, Cóic conara fugill and Uraicecht becc.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 311–319.
Criticises E. Mac Néill's translation of the opening section of Uraicecht Becc (in Best2 2172), showing that it is based on the glossator’s comment rather than the principal text, and accordingly suggests that Mac Néill’s airecar ‘is found’ should be substituted by the reading of the original text, either H 3. 18 arragar ‘is bound’ or BB agar ‘is pleaded’. Includes a translation of the original text of the eight following sections. Also criticises R. Thurneysen's translation (in Best2 2164) of the legal terms aithne (MS aichnid) and aithnid.

Coimín, Mícheál

7471.
Ó hAnluain (Eoghan): Comhfhreagras fileata ó Chontae an Chláir.
In FS de Bhaldraithe (1986), pp. 130–133.
Edition of two poems by Toirdhealbhach Mac Mathghamhna addressed to Mícheál Coimín, and of Coimín’s reply to the first poem. 1. A Mhíchíl, ó chím sínte i gcré gach fear; 2.‘Nar sost go fóill is fearr sinn; 3. Ar dteacht aniar ba trua géar. From RIA 23 M 16. Cf. T. F. O’Rahilly, Danfhocail no. 256.
7359.
Ó Dálaigh (Brian): Mícheál Coimín: Jacobite, Protestant and Gaelic poet 1676-1760.
In SHib 34 (2006–2007), pp. 123–150.

Cóir anmann

1410.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Short cuts to etymology: placenames in Cóir anmann.
In Ériu 50 (1999), pp. 79–86.
Implicit etymologizing of eponymic and non-eponymic place-names in Cóir anmann.
3067.
Arbuthnot (Sharon J.): On the name Oscar and two little known episodes involving the fían.
In CMCS 51 (Summer 2006), pp. 67–81.
Contends that two stories concerning the emasculation of Oscar (found in Acallam na senórech and the NLI MS G 2 version of Cóir anmann) are based on the analysis of this name as if from og ‘testicle’ and scaraid ‘separates, parts’.
3690.
Arbuthnot (Sharon J.): Some accretions to genealogical material in a manuscript boxed with the Book of Leinster.
In ZCP 55 (2006), pp. 57–67.
Studies the relationship between the Laigin genealogies in the additional material stored together with MS TCD H 2. 18 (= sections Q, R and S as ed. by R. Atkinson 1880 [Best1, p. 65]) and the textual tradition of Cóir anmann, arguing that the Laigin genealogies were expanded using the longest version of Cóir anmann, which in turn had as a source a genealogical treatise similar to the 12th c. texts. Includes a transcription of the corresponding passages.
4862.
Field (Deborah A.): Computers In Celtic studies: preliminary notes on Cóir anmann.
In PHCC 4 (1984), pp. 39–44.
3675.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): The manuscript tradition of Cóir anmann.
In StC 35 (2001), pp. 285–298.
Studies the interrelationship of the ‘shorter’ and ‘longer’ recensions, as well as the position of the NLI G 2 version in the stemma codicum.
10710.
Griffin-Kremer (Cozette): Wooings and works: an episode on yoking oxen in the Tochmarc Étaine and the Cóir anmann.
In Eolas 4 (2010), pp. 54–85.
11017.
Arbuthnot (Sharon J.): The copy of Cóir anmann in NLS Adv. MS 72.1.7: alphabetical arrangements, answers and implications.
In ScoGS 25 (2009), pp. 1–21.
Examines the structure of the entries in the Edinburgh copy of Cóir anmann, and argues it is an independent witness to the common ancestor of the early recension.
8075.
Arbuthnot (Sharon) (ed.): Cóir anmann: a late Middle Irish treatise on personal names. Part 2 / edited by Sharon Arbuthnot.
ITS, 60. London: Irish Texts Society, 2006. viii + 217 pp.
Edition of the ‘long version’, based on TCD H 3. 17. Diplomatic text, with English translation and notes.

Rev. by
Gerald Manning, in SHib 35 (2008-2009), pp. 237-239.
Gisbert Hemprich, in ZCP 59 (2012), pp. 231-233.
8074.
Arbuthnot (Sharon) (ed.): Cóir anmann: a late Middle Irish treatise on personal names. Part 1 / edited by Sharon Arbuthnot.
ITS, 59. London: Irish Texts Society, 2005. vii + 248 pp.
Edition of the ‘earliest version’, based on the Book of Ballymote, and of the ‘short version’, based on NLI G 2. Diplomatic texts, with English translation and notes. In Appendices: I. Concordances of entries; II. Genealogical tables.
Rev. by
Gerald Manning, in SHib 35 (2008-2009), pp. 237-239.
Gisbert Hemprich, in ZCP 59 (2012), pp. 231-233.
4355.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Fíthal in Cóir anmann.
In ScoGS 20 (2000), pp. 197–200.
Traces the history of the entry beginning Fíthal ocus Cithruad in the H 4. 8 copy of Cóir anmann.
4364.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): A note on ce(a)s ‘coracle’.
In ScoGS 22 (2006), pp. 87–94.
Argues Dineen’s [Irish-English dictionary, 1927] 2. ceas ‘coracle, etc.' is a ghost-word, and traces its origin to Keating’s erroneous interpretation of the etymology of Uaircheas in FFÉ §27 (as ed. by D. Comyn and P. S. Dineen 1902-1914).
10076.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Medieval Irish compilation: conservation and creativity.
In Medieval manuscripts in transition (2006), pp. 1–12.
Investigates the sources and process of compilation of Cóir anmann.

Colgan, John (cf. Mhág Colgan, Seaán)

7177.
Byrne (Conall): John McColgan (1592-1992).
In Donegal annual 44 (1992), pp. 3–7.
11444.
Bieler (Ludwig): Bethu Phátraic: Versuch einer Grundlegung des Verhältnisses der irischen Patriciusviten zu den lateinischen.
In AnzPHK 111 (1974), pp. 253–273.
Reconstructs the literary history of the legend of St. Patrick through a comparison of the attested Patrician biographical material.

Repr. in L. Bieler, Studies on the life and legend of St Patrick (ed. R. Sharpe), no. xiv (London 1986).
12654.
Ó Riain (Pádraig) (ed.): Four Irish martyrologies: Drummond, Turin, Cashel, York / edited by Pádraig Ó Riain.
Henry Bradshaw Society, 115. London: Boydell, 2002. xiv + 260 pp.
1. The Martyrology of Drummond: introduction; 2. The Martyrology of Drummond: text; 3. The Martyrology of Turin: introduction; 4. The Martyrology of Turin: text; 5. The Martyrology of Cashel: introduction and text; 6. The Irish Martyrology of York: introduction and text. With appendices, bibliography, indexes.

Rev. by

Lisa M. Bitel, in The Catholic historical review 90/1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 106-108.
Pascal Collomb, in Revue d’histoire ecclésiastique 101 (2006), p. 418.
Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, in ZCP 55 (2006), pp. 276-279.

1390.
Mallory (J. P.): Two early modern descriptions of Navan.
In Emania 1 (1986), pp. 22–23.
Reproduces a letter dated 24 April 1835 written by John O’Donovan, commenting on the description of Emain in John Colgan’s Acta Triadis Thaumaturgae (1647).

Collectanea Bedae

2240.
Wright (Charles D.): The Irish ‘enumerative style’ in Old English homiletic literature, especially Vercelli Homily IX.
In CMCS 18 (Winter 1989), pp. 27–74.
Argues that Old English homilists adapted numerical motifs from Old Irish and Hiberno-Latin models.
1084.
Wright (Charles D.): The three ‘victories’ of the wind: a Hibernicism in the Hisperica famina, Collectanea Bedae, and the Old English prose Solomon and Saturn Pater Noster dialogue.
In Ériu 41 (1990), pp. 13–25.

Collectanea (Tírechán)

1258.
Swift (Catherine): Tírechán’s motives in compiling the Collectanea: an alternative interpretation.
In Ériu 45 (1994), pp. 53–82.
1. Tírechán’s aims in compiling the Collectanea: the established position; 2. The diverse nature of Patrician tradition; 3. Tírechán’s attitude to Armagh; 4. The ‘great church of Patrick’ associated with Conall m. Néill; 5. Loíguire’s control over Connacht as portrayed in the Collectanea; 6. The political context within which the Collectanea was written.
2434.
Márkus (Gilbert): What were Patrick’s alphabets?
In CMCS 31 (Summer 1996), pp. 1–15.
Argues that the abgitorias and elementa that St. Patrick is said by Tírechán to have written are best taken as meaning ‘guides to monastic life’, comparable to OIr. aibgitir in Apgitir Chrábaid.
3127.
Picard (Jean-Michel): Les celticismes des hagiographes irlandais du viie siècle.
In ÉtC 29 (1992), pp. 355–373.
Studies the Celtic influence in the language of the following 7th-century Hiberno-Latin hagiological texts: Vita Patricii (Muirchú), Collectanea (Tírechán), Vita Brigitae (Cogitosus) and Vita Columbae (Adomnán).
10520.
Bisagni (Jacopo): A note on the end of the world: Tírechán’s dies erdathe.
In ZCP 58 (2011), pp. 9–18.
ad §12 (as ed. by L. Bieler 1979 [The Patrician texts in the Book of Armagh]); erdathe is interpreted as the gen. sg. of erdath, derived from PC *-dātū, containing the PIE root *dhu̯eh2- ‘to make smoke’.
12307.
Lacey (Brian): Tirechán’s Sírdruimm, Adomnán’s Dorsum Tómme.
In JRSAI 132 (2002), pp. 148–150.
615.
Bhreathnach (Edel): Temoria: caput Scotorum?
In Ériu 47 (1996), pp. 67–88.
Discussion of (references from) Muirchú's Vita Sancti Patricii, Adomnán’s Vita Columbae, Tírechán’s Collectanea, Baile Chuinn Chétchathaig, Feis Temro; on the relationship between Tara and Cashel.

Collectaneum Miscellaneum (Sedulius Scottus)

2409.
Law (Vivien): Fragments from the lost portions of the Epitomae of Virgilius Maro Grammaticus.
In CMCS 21 (Summer 1991), pp. 113–125.
identified in the Florilegium Frisingense (MS München, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 6433) and Sedulius Scottus’ Collectaneum Miscellaneum.

Collectio canonum Hibernensis

3383.
Jaski (Bart): Cú Chuimne, Ruben and the compilation of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis.
In Peritia 14 (2000), pp. 51–69.
3444.
Davies (Luned Mair): Isidorian texts and the Hibernensis.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 207–249.
3369.
Tatsuki (Akiko): The early Irish church and marriage: an analysis of the Hibernensis.
In Peritia 15 (2001), pp. 195–207.
5125.
Etchingham (Colmán): Bishops in the early Irish church: a reassessment.
In SHib 28 (1994), pp. 35–62.
Discusses episcopal status, powers and jurisdiction, with particular reference to the Collectio canonum Hibernensis.
6126.
Sheehy (Maurice P.): The Collectio Canonum Hibernensis: a Celtic phenomenon.
In Die Iren und Europa (1982), pp. 525–535.
3232.
Pryce (Huw): Early Irish canons and medieval Welsh law.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 107–127.
On the influence of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis on the Laws of Hywel Dda.
3443.
O’Loughlin (Thomas): Marriage and sexuality in the Hibernensis.
In Peritia 11 (1997), pp. 188–206.
3406.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): The construction of the Hibernensis.
In Peritia 12 (1998), pp. 209–237.
Studies the textual relationship of De contrariis causis (book 67 in recension A of Collectio canonum Hibernensis) and corresponding material in other books (21-29), and suggests that the A recension is unfinished and was released after the death of compiler Ruben of Darinis (†725), while the B recension is based on a corrected and expanded copy, possibly the work of his collaborator Cú Chuimne of Iona (†747).
3384.
Richter (Michael): Dating the Irish synods in the Collectio canonum Hibernensis.
In Peritia 14 (2000), pp. 70–84.
Proposes a date posterior to the Paschal controversy of 630-640 for the celebration of the Irish synods excerpted in CCH.

In Appendix: The Irish synods in CCH (I. Synodus Hibernensis, Hibernenses; II. Synodus Romana, Romani).
8187.
Ambrose (Shannon): The Collectio canonum Hibernensis and the literature of the Anglo-Saxon Benedictine reform.
In Viator 36 (2005), pp. 107–118.
3315.
Howlett (David): The prologue to the Collectio canonum Hibernensis.
In Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004), pp. 144–149.
Edition, translation and analysis, based on five MSS ranging from the 9th to the 11th centuries.
1447.
Breatnach (Liam): Canon law and secular law in early Ireland: the significance of Bretha nemed.
In Peritia 3 (1984), pp. 439–459.
Discusses Bretha nemed, dated to between 721 and 742, composed in Munster by three kinsmen: Forannán (a bishop), Máel Tuile (a poet) and Báethgalach hua Búirecháin (a judge). Incl. ed. with transl. of six verses of a poem beg. Aimirgin Glungeal tuir teand by Gilla in Choimded Ua Cormaic from RIA MS D ii 1 (Bk of Uí Mhaine). Old Irish version of Collectio Canonum Hibernensis Book XLII, chaps 1-4, ed. with translation and notes from Cotton Nero A 7. Some discussion of rosc and ‘Archaic Irish’.

Colmán mac Léinín

11669.
Ireland (Colin): An Irish precursor of Cædmon.
In N&Q 44/1 (Mar. 1997), pp. 2–4.
Colmán mac Lénéni (†600).
11671.
MacCotter (Paul), Ó Corráin (Donnchadh) (app. auth.): Colmán of Cloyne: a study.
CSIH, 4. Dublin: Four Courts, 2004. 152 pp.
Appendix C: The poems of Colmán: a new translation by Professor Donnchadh Ó Corráin [1. Luin oc elaib; 2. Dūn maic Daim; 3a. Ó ba mac cléib; 3b. Indlith dūn; 4. Nı̄ sēim anim; 5. Nı̄ fordiuchtror for duain indlis; 6. Ropo thānaise; 7. do-aisic a dath. (Based on Rudolf Turnesysen, ZCP 19.193, and Calvert Watkins, Ériu 19.116)].

Colmán mac Lénéni

11669.
Ireland (Colin): An Irish precursor of Cædmon.
In N&Q 44/1 (Mar. 1997), pp. 2–4.
Colmán mac Lénéni (†600).
11671.
MacCotter (Paul), Ó Corráin (Donnchadh) (app. auth.): Colmán of Cloyne: a study.
CSIH, 4. Dublin: Four Courts, 2004. 152 pp.
Appendix C: The poems of Colmán: a new translation by Professor Donnchadh Ó Corráin [1. Luin oc elaib; 2. Dūn maic Daim; 3a. Ó ba mac cléib; 3b. Indlith dūn; 4. Nı̄ sēim anim; 5. Nı̄ fordiuchtror for duain indlis; 6. Ropo thānaise; 7. do-aisic a dath. (Based on Rudolf Turnesysen, ZCP 19.193, and Calvert Watkins, Ériu 19.116)].
2524.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Praise poetry in Ireland before the Normans.
In Ériu 54 (2004), pp. 11–40.
Traces it to the 6th c. and argues that the shortage of examples is due to its oral character and to the refusal on the part of the scriptoria to record it, against G. Murphy (in Best2 1317). Includes fragments collected from K. Meyer 1919 (Best2 1326).

Colmán of Cloyne

11671.
MacCotter (Paul), Ó Corráin (Donnchadh) (app. auth.): Colmán of Cloyne: a study.
CSIH, 4. Dublin: Four Courts, 2004. 152 pp.
Appendix C: The poems of Colmán: a new translation by Professor Donnchadh Ó Corráin [1. Luin oc elaib; 2. Dūn maic Daim; 3a. Ó ba mac cléib; 3b. Indlith dūn; 4. Nı̄ sēim anim; 5. Nı̄ fordiuchtror for duain indlis; 6. Ropo thānaise; 7. do-aisic a dath. (Based on Rudolf Turnesysen, ZCP 19.193, and Calvert Watkins, Ériu 19.116)].
11669.
Ireland (Colin): An Irish precursor of Cædmon.
In N&Q 44/1 (Mar. 1997), pp. 2–4.
Colmán mac Lénéni (†600).

Colmán ua Cluasaig

686.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid S.): The lament for Cuimine Fota.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 17–31.
Eight stanzas assembled from quotations in various texts. Authorship of Colmán ua Cluasaig (7th cent.) rejected. Three separate parts distinguished; linguistically dated to 10th/11th centuries. First line Marbh friom andes marbh antuaidh. Variorum edition, with Engl. transl. and notes. Based on MSS Brussels 5301-20; Rawlinson B 503, RIA C iii 3; Harley 5280; TCD H 2. 16 (YBL); RIA D ii 1 (Book of Uí Maine); RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), TCD H 3. 18.

Colum Cille

517.
Sharpe (Richard): Maghnus Ó Domhnaill’s source for Adomnán’s Vita S. Columbae and other Vitae.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 604–607.
667.
Kelly (Fergus): Tiughraind Bhécáin.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 66–98.
[1.] Introduction; [2.] Language; [3.] Metre and alliteration; [4.] Manuscript; [5.] Authorship. Discusses attribution to Bécán mac Luigdech (7th cent.), metrical, linguistic and stylistix similarities to Fo réir Choluimb céin ad-fías (see F. Kelly, in Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 1-34). Poem in praise of Columb Cille, beg. Doféd andes andáil fíadhatt (25 qq.). Ed. from Laud misc. 615; with English translation and notes.
538.
Kelly (Fergus): A poem in praise of Columb Cille.
In Ériu 24 (1973), pp. 1–34.
Edited from MS NLI G 50 (25 qq.) with reconstructed text, translation and notes. Ascribed in MS heading to Dallán [Forgaill] but ascribed to Becan mac Luighdech in a gloss. Beg. Fo réir Choluimb céin ad-fías. Includes discussion of metre (MS laoidh imrinn), which is described as ‘transitional’, as it displays both alliteration and regular end-rime.
335.
Quin (E. G.): Ochtḟoclach Choluim Chille.
In Celtica 14 (1981), pp. 125–153.
82 qq. in ochtfhoclach metre, ascribed to Colum Cille. Edited from MS Maud Misc. 615 and MS RIA 23 P 2 (Book of Lecan), with English translation and notes. First line Día mór dom imdegail.
665.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): On the ‘prehistory’ of Immram Brain.
In Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 33–52.
[1.] Analogues and sources; [2.] Imacallam Choluim Chille ocus ind Óclaig; [3.] The concluding section of the Imacallam; [4.] The conceptual antiquity of the Imacallam; [5.] Ritual question and answer; [6.] Mag nÉolairg and Mag Fuinnside [relation to Lough Foyle]. Cf. P. Mac Cana, in Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 101-142.
Mac Cana (Proinsias) (ref.)
4907.
Wesseling (Margaret): Structure and image in the Altus prosator: Columba’s symmetrical universe.
In PHCC 8 (1990), pp. 46–57.
235.
Stevenson (Jane): Altus prosator.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 326–368.
Argues that Altus prosator was not composed by St. Columba in the sixth century, but rather is a Hiberno-Latin hymn composed between 650 and 700 ad.

Columba, St.

235.
Stevenson (Jane): Altus prosator.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 326–368.
Argues that Altus prosator was not composed by St. Columba in the sixth century, but rather is a Hiberno-Latin hymn composed between 650 and 700 ad.
517.
Sharpe (Richard): Maghnus Ó Domhnaill’s source for Adomnán’s Vita S. Columbae and other Vitae.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 604–607.

Columbanus

2920.
Fleuriot (Léon): Varia: 1. Le “saint” breton Winniau et le pénitentiel dit “de Finnian''?
In ÉtC 15 (1976), pp. 607–614.
Argues that Uuinniau (later Gaelicized as ‘Finnian’) was a Brittonic saint established in Ireland.
10628.
Stancliffe (Clare): Venantius Fortunatus, Ireland Jerome: the evidence of Precamur patrem.
In Peritia 10 (1996), pp. 91–97.
Supports Columbanus’s authorship.
3397.
Dunn (Marilyn): Tánaise ríg: the earliest evidence.
In Peritia 13 (1999), pp. 249–254.
Argues that Regula magistri was compiled at the Columbanian foundation of Bobbio, and that the term secundarius used in this text for ‘designated successor’ is an early alllusion to the Irish tánaise ríg.
3349.
Bracken (Damien): Authority and duty: Columbanus and the primacy of Rome.
In Peritia 16 (2002), pp. 168–213.
12316.
Leso (Tommaso): Columbanus in Europe: the evidence from the Epistulae.
In EME 21/4 (Nov. 2013), pp. 358–389.
3245.
Lapidge (Michael): Columbanus and the ‘Antiphonary of Bangor’.
In Peritia 4 (1985), pp. 104–116.
Studies the hymn Precamur patrem, and argues it was composed by Columbanus at Bangor between 569 and 590.

Comarbada Pátraic

5171.
Haggart (Craig): Abbatial contention in Armagh in the eight and ninth centuries: the Comarbada Pátraic as a source.
In SHib 32 (2002–2003), pp. 35–58.
Attempts to determine the historical value of the glosses added to the text, in particular those appended to the LL version.

Comhairle Comissarius na Cléire

5141.
Hall (K. E.): Athbhreithniú ar Comhairle Comissarius na cléire.
In SHib 30 (1998–1999), pp. 89–118.
3565.
Williams (N. J. A.): Irish satire and its sources.
In StC 12–13 (1977–1978), pp. 217–246.
2049.
Williams (N. J. A.): Muckletonians.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 284.

Comhairle Mhic Clamha

2041.
Williams (N. J. A.): Scoggin in Éirinn.
In Éigse 18/2 (1981), p. 182.

Comhairle Mhic Clamha ó Achadh na Muilleann

3565.
Williams (N. J. A.): Irish satire and its sources.
In StC 12–13 (1977–1978), pp. 217–246.

Comhric na nGaodhil agus na nGall le Cheile

7250.
Ó Muirí (Réamonn): Lámhscríbhinn staire an Bhionaidigh.
In SAM 9/1 (1978), pp. 123–127.
19th c. paper manuscript in the possession of Breandán Mac Eoin (Ballyward, Co. Down).

Compert Con Culainn

1274.
Hollo (Kaarina): Cú Chulainn and Síd Truim.
In Ériu 49 (1998), pp. 13–22.
[1.] Introduction: reference to Síd Truim in poem in Serglige Con Culainn; [2.] Síd Truim and the Tuatha Dé Danann; [3.] Síd Truim as the place of Cú Chulainn’s birth: in first version of tale Compert Con Culainn contained in MS RIA D iv 2 (1223); [4.] Síd Truim as the place of Cú Chulainn’s burial: in poem A Oisín fuirigh ar Dhia; [5.] The location of Síd Truim; [6.] Conclusions.
2235.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A Connacht medieval literary heritage: texts derived from Cín Dromma Snechtai through Leabhar na hUidhre.
In CMCS 16 (Winter 1988), pp. 1–40.
Argues that LU stands closer to the original Cín Dromma Snechtai texts than MSS Egerton 88 and Dublin, RIA 23 N 10, as it was the direct source of Gilla Commáin Ó Congaláin’s (†1135) selection whence the Connacht MS tradition comes.
2613.
Huld (Martin E.): Cú Chulainn and his IE kin.
In ZCP 38 (1981), pp. 238–241.
On the early Irish usage of siür as ‘woman’s brother’s daughter’ and a textual problem concerning the relationship between Deichtire and Conchobor in Táin bó Cúailnge recension II.
6434.
Deane (Marion): Compert Conculainn: possible antecedents?
6258.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Between God and Man: the hero of Irish tradition.
In Crane Bag 2/1-2 (1978), pp. 72–79.
Republ. in The Crane Bag book of Irish studies, ed. by Mark Patrick Hederman and Richard Kearney (Dublin 1982), pp. 220-227.

With special reference to Cú Chulainn (Compert Con Culainn) and Conaire Mór (Togail bruidne da Derga).

7864.
Deane (Marion): Dangerous liaisons.
In PHCC 23 (2009), pp. 52–79.
10827.
Bernhardt-House (Phillip A.): ‘It’s beginning to look a lot like solstice’: snechta, solar deities, and Compert Con Culainn.
In Ulidia 2 (2009), pp. 226–237.
504.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): The textual tradition of Compert Con Culainn.
In Celtica 21 (1990), pp. 441–455.
Discusses the relationship of the two extant versions as they appear in the two earliest sources, RIA 23 E 25 and Egerton 1782, and argues that a form of the Compert, corresponding to the second version, was known to the author of the poem A rí ríchid réidig dam.

Compert Conchobair

5664.
Ó Cathasaigh (Tomás): Reflections on Compert Conchobuir and Serglige Con Culainn.
In Ulidia 1 (1994), pp. 85–89.
Includes a discussion of the Briatharthecosc Con Culainn.

Compert Conchobuir

11492.
Findon (Joanne): Fabula, story, and text: the case of Compert Conchobuir.
In Narrative in Celtic tradition (2011), pp. 37–55.

Compert Mongáin

634.
Carey (John): On the interrelationships of some Cín Dromma Snechtai texts.
In Ériu 46 (1995), pp. 71–92.
1. The Mongán tales (Argues that all four tales are are the work of a single author: (a) Scél asa mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán; (b) Tucait Baile Mongáin; (c) Compert Mongáín; (d) Scél Mongáin); 2. Tucait Baile Mongáin and Baile Chuinn Chétchathaig [and Baile in Scáil] (Concludes that TBM and Scél asa mberar represent texts in which southern traditions are appropriated by a northern author ); 3. The Imacallam texts, Immram Brain, and the Mongán tales (Immacallam Choluim Chille 7 ind Óclaig and Immacallam in Druad Brain 7 inna Banḟátho Febuil); 4. Echtrae Chonlai and Immram Brain; 5. ‘The Midland group’ (Claims these date from the reign of Fínnechta Fledach mac Dúnchada, perhaps from the years 688-9); 6. Tochmarc Étaíne.
2235.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A Connacht medieval literary heritage: texts derived from Cín Dromma Snechtai through Leabhar na hUidhre.
In CMCS 16 (Winter 1988), pp. 1–40.
Argues that LU stands closer to the original Cín Dromma Snechtai texts than MSS Egerton 88 and Dublin, RIA 23 N 10, as it was the direct source of Gilla Commáin Ó Congaláin’s (†1135) selection whence the Connacht MS tradition comes.
2978.
White (Nora): Compert Mongáin and three other early Mongán tales: a critical edition with introduction, translation, textual notes, bibliography and vocabulary.
MMIT, 5. Maynooth: Department of Old and Middle Irish, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, 2006. iv + 227 pp.
Also incl. Scél as-a:mberar combad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán, Scél Mongáin and Tucait baile Mongáin.
528.
Mac Cana (Proinsias): Mongán mac Fiachna and Immram Brain.
In Ériu 23 (1972), pp. 102–142.
[1.] The prose of Cín Droma Snechta; [2.] The contextual affinities of Immram Brain; [3.] The incarnation and the birth of Mongán; [4.] Instances of the wonder-child in insular Celtic tradition. See also P. Mac Cana, in Ériu 26 (1975), pp. 33-52.
Mac Cana (Proinsias) (ref.)

Compert Mongáin ocus serc Duibe Lacha do Mongán

10317.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Mongán’s metamorphosis: Compert Mongáin ocus serc Duibe Lacha do Mongán, a later Mongán tale.
In Tome [Charles-Edwards studies] (2011), pp. 207–216.

Computus Einsidlensis

3303.
Warntjes (Immo): A newly discovered Irish computus: Computus Einsidlensis.
In Peritia 19 (2005), pp. 61–64.
MS Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, 321 (649).
5146.
Bisagni (Jacopo), Warntjes (Immo): The Early Old Irish material in the newly discovered Computus Einsidlensis (c. AD 700).
In Ériu 58 (2008), pp. 77–105.
Provides a linguistic analysis of the Irish material in Einsiedeln, Stiftsbibliothek, MS 321 (647).

Comrac Fir Diad

6588.
Ó Fiannachta (Pádraig): The fight with Fer Diad.
In JCLAHS 18/1 (1973), pp. 62–68.

Comracc Líadaine 7 Cuirithir

8830.
Larson (Heather Feldmeth): The veiled poet: Líadain and Cuirithir and the role of the woman-poet.
2007.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): The semantics of banscál.
In Éigse 31 (1999), pp. 31–35.
banscál ‘female warrior’ > ‘laywoman’. Also ad Líadain and Cuirithir (as ed. by K. Meyer 1902 [Best1, p. 118]) lines 16-17.

Comram na Cloenfherta

1824.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Comram na Cloenfherta.
In Celtica 11 (1976), pp. 168–179.
Ed. from MS Rawlinson B 502, with English translation and notes. Text at its close referred to as Mortlaid ban Temra.

Comthóth Lóegaire co cretim 7 a aided

2401.
Carey (John): The two laws in Dubthach’s judgment.
In CMCS 19 (Summer 1990), pp. 1–18.
Discusses the terms recht litre and recht aicnid as used in the ‘pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már' and interprets the episode as an allegory of the transition from pagan to Christian in Irish culture. Criticises K. McCone, in Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 1-35.

Conall Ó Baoighill

1526.
Ó hUrmoltaigh (Nollaig): Amhráin as Toraigh.
In Éigse 15/3 (Samhradh 1974), pp. 224–234.
Seven songs (with phonetic transcription) recorded from Jimmy (Shéamais Bháin) Ó Mianáin, Tory Island: [1.] Pádraig 'ac Ruaidhrí beg. A Phádraig 'ic Ruaidhrí, is tú corp an duine uasail; [2.] Na Buachaillí in Albain beg. Mo bheannacht leis na buachaillí a d’imthigh uaim thar sáile; [3.] Conall Ó Baoighill beg. Tháinig an bás go fáilthidhe 'ugam ar cuairt; [4.] Brighid Óg Ní Mháille beg. A Bhrighid Óg Ní Mháille, is tú d’fhág mo chroidhe cráidhte; [5.] Seán Bán beg. Mo chosa, mo lámha, mo chnámha, is tá mé uilig tinn; [6.] Béal Buidhe Uaighe beg. Is iomdhaidh lasta préataí a thug mé féin is mo dhearbhráthair; [7.] Péarla an Bhrollaigh Ghil Bháin beg. Tharlaidh dom péarla an bhrollaigh ghil bháin.

Conchubranus

3301.
Howlett (David): Three poems about Monenna.
In Peritia 19 (2005), pp. 1–19.
In Latin; edited, with analysis and English translation, from BL Cotton Cleopatra A ii.
7252.
Ulster Society for Medieval Latin Studies: The life of Saint Monenna by Conchubranus.
In SAM 9/2 (1979), pp. 250–273; 10/1 (1980–1981), pp. 117–141; 10/2 (1982), pp. 426–454.
Latin text, edited from Cotton Cleopatra A ii; with English translation.

Corrigenda in SAM 10/1 (1980–1981), pp. 117–141.

Confessio (Patrick)

5176.
Keogh (Raymond M.): Palladius: Bishop or phantom?
In SHib 33 (2004–2005), pp. 7–27.
Studies the relationship between St. Patrick and Palladius, and argues in favour of the two being the same person.
5169.
Keogh (Raymond M.): Patrick and the Prosper connection.
In SHib 32 (2002–2003), pp. 7–34.
Argues that Patrick and Prosper were contemporaries and comments on the chronology of Patrick’s life and writings.
5808.
Young (Simon): Et iterum post: Dislocation in St Patrick’s Confessio?
In SC 2 (2003), pp. 69–75.
Studies the ordering of sections §§20-23 (as ed. by Ludwig Bieler 1952), arguing that §21 was dislocated in the early transmission of the text and that the original sequence §§20-22-21-23 should be restored.
2159.
Herren (Michael): Mission and monasticism in the Confessio of Patrick.
3316.
Howlett (David): Numerical punctilio in Patrick’s Confessio.
In Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004), pp. 150–153.
3677.
Young (Simon): A note on St Patrick’s Confessio: Gloria patris est.
In StC 35 (2001), p. 360.
ad §47.
3851.
Hanson (R. P. C.): The D-Text of St. Patrick’s Confession: original or reduction?
In PRIA-C 77 (1977), pp. 251–256.
7118.
Ó Raifeartaigh (T.): Silva Focluti, quae est prope Mare Occidentale (St. Patrick’s Confession, 23): a new approach.
In Maynooth review 4/1 (May 1978), pp. 25–27.
7108.
Ó Raifeartaigh (Tarlach): Naomh Pádraig agus foireann na loinge.
In Maynooth review 8 (May 1983), pp. 1–4.
7263.
Ó Raifeartaigh (Tarlach): St. Patrick and the defensio.
In SAM 11/1 (1983–1984), pp. 22–31.
7392.
de Paor (Déaglan): Oilithreacht Phádraig.
In SAM 16/2 (1995), pp. 39–68.
7591.
Hayes-Healy (Stephanie): Saint Patrick’s journey to the desert: Confessio 16-28 as ascetic discourse.
In ArH 59 (2005), pp. 237–259.
9842.
Hanson (R. P. C.): The rule of faith of Victorinus and of Patrick.
In Latin script and letters [FS Bieler] (1976), pp. 25–36.
ad Confessio §4 (as ed. by Ludwig Bieler 1952).
9841.
O’Meara (J.): Patrick’s Confessio and Augustine’s Confessiones.
In Latin script and letters [FS Bieler] (1976), pp. 44–53.
3340.
Young (Simon): In gentibus dispersisti nos: the British diaspora in Patrick and Gildas.
In Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004), pp. 505–506.
ad Confessio §1.
1591.
Dronke (Peter): St. Patrick’s reading.
In CMCS 1 (Summer 1981), pp. 21–38.
Analyses influence of Patristic writers on Patrick’s Confessio.
11546.
Dumville (David N.): The form of St. Patrick’s Confessio in the Book of Armagh.
In Saint Patrick 493-1993 (1993), pp. 191–202.
Includes reconstructed Latin text.

Connellan, Thaddeus

1778.
de Brún (Pádraig): The Irish Society’s bible teachers, 1818-27.
In Éigse 19/2 (1983), pp. 281–332; 20 (1984), pp. 34–92; 21 (1986), pp. 72–149; 22 (1987), pp. 54–106; 24 (1990), pp. 71–120; 25 (1991), pp. 113–149; 26 (1992), pp. 131–172.
An annotated list of the Society’s teachers during its first nine years, derived primarily from the Committee minutes (MSS TCD 7644 and 7645). Includes an elaboration on Thaddaeus Connellan (1780-1854), the reinstatement of Irish type, and a list of Irish-English primers, 1810-1825, circulated for evangelical purposes.

Republ. as Scriptural instruction in the vernacular: the Irish Society and its teachers, 1818-27. Dublin: DIAS, 2009. [xii] + [682]. Revised and augmented.

Conṡlechtae

8595.
Breatnach (Liam): On the glossing of early Irish law texts, fragmentary texts, and some aspects of the laws relating to dogs.
In Celtica helsingensia (1996), pp. 11–20.

Coquebert de Montbret, Jean Antoine

6612.
Ní Chinnéide (Síle): An 18th-century French traveller in Kildare.
In JCKAS 15/4 (1974–1975), pp. 376–386.

Córas béscnai

1232.
Etchingham (Colmán): The implications of paruchia.
In Ériu 44 (1993), pp. 139–162.
[1.] Paruchia in canons and hagiography; [2.] Córas Béscnai and the ‘Drumlease document’; [3.] Conclusion. Paruchia refers to the pastoral jurisdiction of a bishop and not to a federation of geographicaly dispersed monasteries.

Cormac mac Cuilennáin

2233.
Russell (Paul): The sounds of a silence: the growth of Cormac’s glossary.
In CMCS 15 (Summer 1988), pp. 1–30.
Incl. survey of extant native glossaries and their MS versions.
3474.
Watkins (Calvert): Varia III: 2. In essar dam do ā?.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 161–165.
On the word á ‘wagon, cart’ and the verse which glosses it in Cormac’s Glossary, beg. In essar dam do ā.
2154.
Breatnach (Liam): An edition of Amra Senáin.
In Sages, saints and storytellers [FS Carney] (1989), pp. 7–31.
Suggested authorship: Cormac mac Cuilennáin (†908). Text from MS Dublin RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), and reconstructed text. First line Senán soer sídathair. With English translation, notes and metrical analysis.
3048.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Les gloses celtiques aux commentaires de Virgile.
In ÉtC 23 (1986), pp. 81–128.
1. ECLOGA dans le Glossaire de Cormac [gloss. elada]. 3. Les gloses irlandaises à Philargyrius [Explanatio A and B (cf. Thes. II, pp. 46-48 and 360-363), edited from MSS Paris, BNF Latin 11308 and Latin 7960, and MS Firenze, Laurentian Pluteus 45, 14; with commentary].

Addendum in ÉtC 24 (1987), pp. 327-328.

3668.
Falileyev (Alexander): Father of muse and son of inspiration.
In StC 32 (1998), pp. 277–278.
Discusses OIr. mac uad (Corm. Y 599) and its relationship to W tad awen (in Talhaearn’s epithet Tat Aguen).
8933.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Further to the drink of death.
In Éigse 37 (2010), pp. 134–141.
On lathirt (Corm. LB 27.8-9). Proposes that in this version of ‘Cormac’s glossary’ the lemma was reinterpreted as either ‘milk of death’ (laith irt) or ‘death of a warrior’ (láithirt).
5351.
Williams (Éimear): Bealtaine and Imbolg (oimelc) in Cormac’s Glossary.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 123–143.
Examines the definitions of bel, belltaine and oimelc in Cormac’s Glossary and criticises the received assumptions concerning the festivals of Beltaine and Imbolg which derive from a wrong interpretation of these particular glosses.
5358.
Russell (Paul): Welsh *Cynnwgl and related matters.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 181–188.
OIr. (Cormac’s Glossary) ceinticul, cennticul, etc.
9797.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): The prull narrative in Sanas Cormaic.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 163–177.
5354.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Glossary entries, DIL and the struggle with meaning: some case studies.
In StC 42 (2008), pp. 117–134.
I. ceimesdin/cemeas [Corm. LB 10.31; H 3. 18, 67c36 = CIH ii 611.12 (Dúil Dromma Cetta)] ; II. ord [Corm. Y 1030]; III. minarba [Corm. Y 901]; IV. bíail [Corm. Y 126]; V. rot [Corm. Y 1120]; VI. loscuirn [Corm. Y 838]; VII. bradán [Corm. Y 158]; VIII. lon [H 3. 18, 76a36 = CIH ii 622.31].
8658.
Driessen (C. Michiel), Wiel (Caroline aan de): British *sʉ̄ðiklo- and *kentunklo-, two loans from Latin.
In StC 37 (2003), pp. 17–34.
Also on OIr. ceinticul (Corm. Y 239).
10523.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Máire): Cormac mac Cuilennáin: king, bishop, and ‘wondrous sage’.
In ZCP 58 (2011), pp. 108–128.
Discusses the figure of Cormac and his literary importance through an analysis of the corpus of poetic compositions attributed to him.
3322.
Jaski (Bart): The genealogical section of the Psalter of Cashel.
In Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004), pp. 295–337.
Discuses in particular the date and provenance of the Munster genealogies that derive from the Psalter of Cashel.
2961.
Isaac (G. R.): A note on Cormac’s Pictish brooch.
In JCeltLing 9 (Nov. 2005), pp. 73–82.
Argues, through comparison of OIr. catait, cartait with W cathet, that the original form of the borrowed Pictish word was *kazdet-.
12827.
Carey (John): Dán doiléir atá curtha i leith Chormaic mhic Cuileannáin.
233.
Poppe (Erich): Cormac’s metrical testament: Mithig techt tar mo thimna.
In Celtica 23 (1999), pp. 300–311.
13 qq.; based on Franciscan MS A 9, with English translation and notes. Ascribed to Cormac mac Cuilennáin in concluding quatrain.
4676.
Rodway (Simon): ‘Gaulish’ megaliths in Ireland? Gall in Sanas Cormaic.
In CMCS 55 (Summer 2008), pp. 41–50.
Argues that Cormac’s derivation of OIr. gall ‘standing stone’ (Corm. Y 683) < Gall (= L Gallus) is unfounded and criticises the view that this entry provides evidence for an Irish tradition of Gaulish settlement in Ireland.

Cormac MagShamhradhain

735.
Simms (Katharine): Gabh umad a Fheidhlimidh. A fifteenth-century inauguration ode?
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 132–145.
Poem beg. Gabh umad a Fheidhlimidh addressed to Feidhlim(idh) Fionn, son of Ó Conchobhair Ruadh and composed by the historian Torna Ua Maoil Chonaire (†1468) c. 1464-66. Refers to two other poems possibly composed by same author, i.e. Tosach féile fairsinge, addressed to Tomaltach son of Conchobhar Óg MacDiarmada, chief of Magh Luirg (†1458); Buaidh n-easbaig ar Ardachadh, addressed to Cormac MagShamhradhain, bishop of Ardagh 1444-ca. 1476. Notes association of ae freislighe metre with informal poetry and its use by gifted amateurs rather than professional bards.

Cormac’s glossary

2233.
Russell (Paul): The sounds of a silence: the growth of Cormac’s glossary.
In CMCS 15 (Summer 1988), pp. 1–30.
Incl. survey of extant native glossaries and their MS versions.
3474.
Watkins (Calvert): Varia III: 2. In essar dam do ā?.
In Ériu 29 (1978), pp. 161–165.
On the word á ‘wagon, cart’ and the verse which glosses it in Cormac’s Glossary, beg. In essar dam do ā.
2747.
Russell (Paul): Laws, glossaries and legal glossaries in early Ireland.
In ZCP 51 (1999), pp. 85–115.
Considers the legal material attested in early Irish glossaries, and studies in particular the citations from Senchas már and Bretha nemed extant in Cormac’s Glossary, arguing that groups of glossae collectae extracted from the manuscripts containing these texts intervened in its compilation.
3048.
Lambert (Pierre-Yves): Les gloses celtiques aux commentaires de Virgile.
In ÉtC 23 (1986), pp. 81–128.
1. ECLOGA dans le Glossaire de Cormac [gloss. elada]. 3. Les gloses irlandaises à Philargyrius [Explanatio A and B (cf. Thes. II, pp. 46-48 and 360-363), edited from MSS Paris, BNF Latin 11308 and Latin 7960, and MS Firenze, Laurentian Pluteus 45, 14; with commentary].

Addendum in ÉtC 24 (1987), pp. 327-328.

3157.
Russell (Paul): Dúil Dromma Cetta and Cormac’s Glossary.
In ÉtC 32 (1996), pp. 147–174.
Investigates the textual history of Dúil Dromma Cetta and examines the relationship of this text to Sanas Cormaic.

Appendix 1 contains (a) a transcription of the legible parts of Egerton 1782 fol. 15 and (b) a transcription of TCD H 1. 13 pp. 361-362; Appendix 2 contains a sample concordance to Dúil Dromma Cetta.

7073.
Rodway (Simon): What language did St. Patrick swear in?
In Ériu 59 (2009), pp. 139–151.
Proposes an alternative Irish etymology for St. Patrick’s oath modebroth.
3668.
Falileyev (Alexander): Father of muse and son of inspiration.
In StC 32 (1998), pp. 277–278.
Discusses OIr. mac uad (Corm. Y 599) and its relationship to W tad awen (in Talhaearn’s epithet Tat Aguen).
8933.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Further to the drink of death.
In Éigse 37 (2010), pp. 134–141.
On lathirt (Corm. LB 27.8-9). Proposes that in this version of ‘Cormac’s glossary’ the lemma was reinterpreted as either ‘milk of death’ (laith irt) or ‘death of a warrior’ (láithirt).
5351.
Williams (Éimear): Bealtaine and Imbolg (oimelc) in Cormac’s Glossary.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 123–143.
Examines the definitions of bel, belltaine and oimelc in Cormac’s Glossary and criticises the received assumptions concerning the festivals of Beltaine and Imbolg which derive from a wrong interpretation of these particular glosses.
9797.
Ní Dhonnchadha (Máirín): The prull narrative in Sanas Cormaic.
In Cín chille cúile [Ó Riain essays] (2004), pp. 163–177.
5354.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Glossary entries, DIL and the struggle with meaning: some case studies.
In StC 42 (2008), pp. 117–134.
I. ceimesdin/cemeas [Corm. LB 10.31; H 3. 18, 67c36 = CIH ii 611.12 (Dúil Dromma Cetta)] ; II. ord [Corm. Y 1030]; III. minarba [Corm. Y 901]; IV. bíail [Corm. Y 126]; V. rot [Corm. Y 1120]; VI. loscuirn [Corm. Y 838]; VII. bradán [Corm. Y 158]; VIII. lon [H 3. 18, 76a36 = CIH ii 622.31].
5358.
Russell (Paul): Welsh *Cynnwgl and related matters.
In StC 39 (2005), pp. 181–188.
OIr. (Cormac’s Glossary) ceinticul, cennticul, etc.
8658.
Driessen (C. Michiel), Wiel (Caroline aan de): British *sʉ̄ðiklo- and *kentunklo-, two loans from Latin.
In StC 37 (2003), pp. 17–34.
Also on OIr. ceinticul (Corm. Y 239).
2961.
Isaac (G. R.): A note on Cormac’s Pictish brooch.
In JCeltLing 9 (Nov. 2005), pp. 73–82.
Argues, through comparison of OIr. catait, cartait with W cathet, that the original form of the borrowed Pictish word was *kazdet-.
3149.
Russell (Paul): Notes on words in early Irish glossaries.
In ÉtC 31 (1995), pp. 195–204.
1. íarus; 2. imbas for·osnai; 3 lúathrinde.

Cormac’s glossary

10995.
Arbuthnot (Sharon): Glossary entries on anart ‘a shroud’, the drink of death and the conjunction dath ‘because’.
In ScoGS 24 (2008), pp. 39–51.
On the anart entries in Sanas Cormaic (Corm. Y §37) and Dúil Dromma Cetta (CIH ii 605.15), focusing on the meaning of the citation dath don dich irt, which is interpreted as ‘because death comes’. In Appendix discusses two further instances of conjunction dath ‘because’ from Dúil Dromma Cetta.

Corrigan, Fr William, (1860-1924)

5164.
Ó hÓgáin (Éamonn): Sloinnteoir an Chorragánach.
In SHib 31 (2000–2001), pp. 191–210.
A list of surnames compiled in Ossory (Co. Kilkenny) by Fr William Corrigan (1860-1924).

Córus bard cona bairdne

3351.
Ó hAodha (Donncha): The first Middle-Irish metrical tract: two notes.
In Peritia 16 (2002), pp. 232–241.
1. On the additional metrical examples added to the various manuscript versions of Mittelirische Verslehren I; 2. ad AU 840.4 = Kuno Meyer, Bruchstücke der älteren Lyrik Irlands p.10 §15 [Is hē Feidilmith in rı̄]; read éit rige.
5832.
Ó hAodha (Donncha): An bhairdne i dtús a ré.
In LCC 24 (1994), pp. 9–20.
Discusses the metrical tract entitled Córus bard cona bairdne (Mittelirische Verslehren I, ed. by R. Thurneysen 1891 [Best1, p. 53]). Includes a list of the metres associated with every grade.

Córus béscnai

3228.
McCone (Kim): Dubthach maccu Lugair and a matter of life and death in the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 1–35.
Studies the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas már, discussing in particular its literary background, its dating, and the relationship between Dubthach’s poem and the narrative framework which surrounds it. Includes an edition of the poem, reconstructed from Harley 432 (= CIH ii 340.28-341.23); with textual notes and English translation.
2661.
McLeod (Neil): Interpreting early Irish law: status and currency. Part 2.
In ZCP 42 (1987), pp. 41–115.
Reconstructs the honour-prices corresponding to the previously discussed grades and examines the units of currency used in payments.

Continued from ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 46-65.

Cottonian Annals

3404.
Maund (K. L.): Sources of the ‘world chronicle’ in the Cottonian Annals.
In Peritia 12 (1998), pp. 153–176.
Examines the early section of the Annals of Boyle with the aim of identifying the sources used, relating it to the world chronicle sections in other Irish annals.

Cox, Stephen (al. Stiabhna Mac Cuiligin, fl. c. 1760 )

1907.
Ó Muirithe (Diarmaid): De aleatoribus.
In Éigse 24 (1990), pp. 147–149.
On a textual variant (concerning Classical knowledge) in Fógraim, leathaim is scaipim ameasg na tíre, (sometimes) attributed to one Stephen Cox (Stiabhna Mac Cuiligin). Cf. C. G. Buttimer, JCHAS 93 (1988), pp. 126-137.

Craobhscaoileadh seanchais Chloinne Piarais

6246.
Pierse (John H.): The origin of the Pierse family of Co. Kerry.
In JKAHS 5 (1972), pp. 14–32.
Appendix: Craobhscaoileadh seanchais Chloinne Piarais (text from MS UCD Ferriter 1; with English translation).

Créad í in cead aithne

421.
de Brún (Pádraig): Dhá bhlogh de theagasc Críostaí: ó ré Éilíse I (?).
In Celtica 19 (1987), pp. 55–58.
Ed. from MS London, PROL SP 63/207/6. I, beg. Créad í in cead aithne; II, beg. Chréad í suim an rachta go hiomslán. Dated to 1600 (?) and preserved by Dr Meredith Hanmer (†1604).

Créd’s lament

2917.
Lehmann (Ruth P. M.): Lament of Crede, daughter of Gúaire.
In ÉtC 15 (1976), pp. 549–551.
ad It é saigte gona súain, q. 3 (cf. EILyr (49. Créide’s lament for Cáel), pp. 148-151, and Golden treasury (16. Créd’s lament), pp. 78-80). With Irish text and English translation.

Crede’s lament

2917.
Lehmann (Ruth P. M.): Lament of Crede, daughter of Gúaire.
In ÉtC 15 (1976), pp. 549–551.
ad It é saigte gona súain, q. 3 (cf. EILyr (49. Créide’s lament for Cáel), pp. 148-151, and Golden treasury (16. Créd’s lament), pp. 78-80). With Irish text and English translation.

Cregeen, Archibald (1776-1841)

1956.
Breatnach (R. A.): Cregeen’s Manx proverbs and familiar phrases.
In Éigse 27 (1993), pp. 1–34.
Collection of 212 items publ. in A dictionary of the Manx language (1835), with transliteration into early modern English spelling and linguistic notes.

Créide’s lament for Cáel

2917.
Lehmann (Ruth P. M.): Lament of Crede, daughter of Gúaire.
In ÉtC 15 (1976), pp. 549–551.
ad It é saigte gona súain, q. 3 (cf. EILyr (49. Créide’s lament for Cáel), pp. 148-151, and Golden treasury (16. Créd’s lament), pp. 78-80). With Irish text and English translation.

Críchadh an Chaoilli

6075.
Bhreathnach (Edel): Críchadh an Chaoilli: a medieval territory revealed.
In JCHAS 110 (2005), pp. 85–95.
Discusses a topographical tract providing information on the area of Co. Cork formerly known as Caoille.

Críth gablach

2652.
McLeod (Neil): Interpreting early Irish law: status and currency. Part 1.
In ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 46–65.
Argues that the sevenfold division of the grades of laity is an artificial imposition of the church grades on an older, native order, and seeks to establish this original model.

Continues in ZCP 42 (1987), pp. 41-115.

12471.
McLeod (Neil): The lord of slaughter.
In Land beneath the sea [Ahlqvist essays] (2013), pp. 101–114.
3803.
Lindeman (Fredrik Otto): Varia IV: 2. Old Irish nant, nád, etc.
In Ériu 31 (1980), p. 165.
ad line 130 of CG. Discusses a deviant use of nád n- as 3rd sg. neg. rel. of the copula.
791.
McLeod (Neil): The two fer midboth and their evidence in court.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 59–63.
The distinction between the two kinds of fer midboth described in Críth Gablach: unnecessary to distinguish between ‘compurgation’ and ‘preserving statement’.
1617.
Gerriets (Marilyn): Economy and society: clientship according to the Irish laws.
In CMCS 6 (Winter 1983), pp. 43–61.
Analysis of obligations of aigillne ‘base clientship’ and choice of clientship partner based on Críth Gablach, Cáin Aigillne and other legal texts.
3016.
Wagner (H.): Beiträge in Erinnerung an Julius Pokorny: 12. OIr. mí sílta ‘the month of sowing’ (= Spring?).
In ZCP 32 (1972), p. 80.
Term for ‘spring(time)' occurring in Crı́th Gablach, lines 535 ff.
3114.
Henry (P. L.): Interpreting Críth gablach: 1. The noble grades, §34.
In ZCP 36 (1978), pp. 54–56.
Argues in favour of a rendering with fronted object for lines 490-491 of CG.
3169.
Henry (P. L.): Interpreting Críth gablach: 2. tánaise.
In ZCP 36 (1978), pp. 56–60.
Analyses it as a past participle *to-ad-naisse ‘joined to’, cf. ad-naisc.
3168.
Henry (P. L.): Interpreting Críth gablach: 3. aire cosring.
In ZCP 36 (1978), pp. 60–62.
Takes con ·srenga, coisreng in CG line 277 as the equivalents of Lat. contrahit, contractus ‘makes a contract, contract’.
2661.
McLeod (Neil): Interpreting early Irish law: status and currency. Part 2.
In ZCP 42 (1987), pp. 41–115.
Reconstructs the honour-prices corresponding to the previously discussed grades and examines the units of currency used in payments.

Continued from ZCP 41 (1986), pp. 46-65.

3766.
Quin (E. G.): Textual notes: [2] A phrase in Críth gablach.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), p. 94.
ad D. A. Binchy, BILL III: 1479.
1466.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): A contract between king and people in medieval Ireland? Críth gablach on kingship.
In Peritia 8 (1994), pp. 107–119.
Analyses practicalities, ideals and obligations of kingship. Incl. discussion of terms oirdnidir ‘ordains’ and folud ‘contractual obligation’.
2809.
Kelly (Patricia): Two relative clauses in Críth gablach.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 373–377.
Argues that D. A. Binchy's emendation of the two sentences introduced by céin in Críth gablach §9, 77-79 is unnecessary, and offers an interpretation of the text that allows the restoration of the original readings in MS TCD H 3. 18 (céin mbís maice and céin bes n-óenchiniud).
2815.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid): The briugu in early Irish society.
In ZCP 49–50 (1997), pp. 482–493.
Discusses the term briugu and the process of promotion from the freemen grades to the noble grades according to early Irish law, and also argues, based on an analysis of their property qualifications and their moral character, that the briugu of Uraicecht becc and the mruigḟer of Críth gablach (complemented by the fer fothlai) are variant designations of the same rank.
4710.
Aitchison (N. B.): Kingship, society, and sacrality: rank, power, and ideology in early medieval Ireland.
In Traditio 49 (1994), pp. 45–75.
3230.
Charles-Edwards (T. M.): Críth gablach and the law of status.
In Peritia 5 (1986), pp. 53–73.
1. Introduction; 2. The nobility; 3. Incremental and functional status; 4. Non-noble freemen; 5. Land, plough-team and livestock; 6. Conclusion.
3373.
Ó Corráin (Donnchadh): Some cruxes in Críth gablach.
In Peritia 15 (2001), pp. 311–320.
[1.] eipit, dias ḟidchrann (ad CG §14.178); [2.] The render of an ócaire [tarr, tinne] (ad CG §10.109-111).
3324.
McGowan (Megan): Royal succession in earlier medieval Ireland: the fiction of tanistry.
In Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004), pp. 357–381.
Examines evidence from legal, genealogical, narrative, and annalistic sources for the use of the term tánaise ríg, and proposes this signified ‘the second in rank to a king’, while arguing that this institution was only a political ideal in early medieval Ireland and was not put into practice (and only partially) until later times.

Croidhe cainnte Ciarraighe

10262.
Ní Mhaonaigh (Tracey): Éacht foclóireachta: Croidhe cainnte Ciarraighe le Seán Óg Ó Caomhánaigh.
In Bliainiris 7 (2007), pp. 204–228.
6458.
Ó Brosnacháin (Niall): Éist leis an gCóta: saothar foclóireachta Sheáin a’ Chóta á mheá agus á mheas.
Dán agus tallann, 7. Maigh Nuad: An Sagart, 2001. 387 pp.
Studies Croidhe cainnte Ciarraighe (NLI G 601-629), by Seán Ó Caomhánaigh. Includes a biographical account of the author.

Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024)

4633.
Downey (Clodagh): Trí croind Éirenn oiregdha: a medieval poem on three famous trees of Ireland.
In Éigse 36 (2008), pp. 1–34.
29 qq., ascribed to Cúán (ua Lóthcháin?), semi-diplomatic text from RIA D ii 1 (Book of Uí Maine); with English translation and notes.
794.
Ó Concheanainn (Tomás): A pious redactor of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
In Ériu 33 (1982), pp. 85–98.
Analysis of content and style of devotional stanzas appended to 20 dinnshenchas poems; use of , Coimdiu, Dúilem, Fer adressing the Deity. Concludes that Cuán ua Lóchán (†1024) is the author. [1.] Introduction; [2.] ‘Loch Dergderc’ (beg. Inlinnse luaidim cach lá), `Áth Luain’ (beg. A ḟhir théit i mag Medba), ‘Carn Furbaide’ (beg. Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath); Saltair na Rann; [2.] ‘Cleitech’ (beg. Cleitech in druí díles daith); [3.] ‘Crechmael’ (beg. In dremsa nach duairc oc dáil); [4.] ‘Es Ruaid I’ (beg. A ḟhir dodechaid atuaid); [5.] ‘Lia Nothain’ (beg. Atá sunn fo choirthe chruaid), ‘Sliab Betha’ (beg. Atchíu lecht deoraid do chéin), ‘Druim Cliab’ (beg. Sunna ro boí Caurnan cas), ‘Cerna’ (beg. Cia bem sunn 'nar suide sel), ‘Loch nÉrne’ (beg. Loch nÉrne, ard a oscur), ‘Ard Macha’ (beg. In mag imriadat ar n-eich), ‘Temair III’ (beg. Temair togha na tulach); [6.] ‘Dubthir’ (beg. Dubthir Guaire, gním dia fail), ‘Nemthenn’ (beg. Dreco ingen Chalcmaíl chruaid), ‘Mag Luirg’ (beg. Is eol dam im threbthas tó); [7.] ‘Mag Muirisce’ (beg. A ḟhir a Muirisc na marc); [8.] ‘Loch Néil’ (beg. Luaidim Loch Néil, násad nglé); [9.] ‘Benn Ḟoibne’ (beg. Eol dam co soirbe sercaig); 10. The rime dil: -ḟir and ‘Mag nAí' (beg. A ḟir, dia téis i Mag nAí); [11.] A poet’s enthusiasm for his subject.

Cúán ua Lóthcháin

4633.
Downey (Clodagh): Trí croind Éirenn oiregdha: a medieval poem on three famous trees of Ireland.
In Éigse 36 (2008), pp. 1–34.
29 qq., ascribed to Cúán (ua Lóthcháin?), semi-diplomatic text from RIA D ii 1 (Book of Uí Maine); with English translation and notes.

Cuimíne Fota

7830.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid S.): A life of Cumaine Fota.
In Béaloideas 39–41 (1971–1973), pp. 192–205.
Text from RIA C i 2.
686.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid S.): The lament for Cuimine Fota.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 17–31.
Eight stanzas assembled from quotations in various texts. Authorship of Colmán ua Cluasaig (7th cent.) rejected. Three separate parts distinguished; linguistically dated to 10th/11th centuries. First line Marbh friom andes marbh antuaidh. Variorum edition, with Engl. transl. and notes. Based on MSS Brussels 5301-20; Rawlinson B 503, RIA C iii 3; Harley 5280; TCD H 2. 16 (YBL); RIA D ii 1 (Book of Uí Maine); RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), TCD H 3. 18.

Cuimre na nGenealach

11657.
Ó Muraíle (Nollaig): Leabhar mór na ngenealach: The great book of Irish genealogies, compiled (1645-66) by Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh / edited with translation and indexes by Nollaig Ó Muraíle.
Dublin: De Búrca, 2003.
Vol. I [= LGen. I, 1-299]: Pre-Gaels; Early Gaels; Northern and Southern Uí Néill; Connacht. xiv + 687 pp.
Vol. II [= LGen. I, 300-573]: Oriel; Galic Scotland; Leinster; East Ulster; Munster; Saints. 803 pp.
Vol. III [= LGen. I, 754-957; LGen. II, 1001-1422]: Kings, Vikings, Normans; ‘Index’; Topographical poems [Triallam timcheall na Fódla (598 ll.), by Seaán Ó Dubhagáin; Tuilleadh feasa ar Éirinn óigh (196 qq.), by Giolla-na-Naomh Ó hUidhrín; Foras focal luaighthear libh (17 qq.) by Seaán Ó Dubhagáin]; Shorter book of genealogies [= Cuimre na nGenealach]. 772 pp.
Vol. IV: General volume [Concordance; Photographic reproductions of manuscript pages; Indexes; Addenda et corrigenda]. xvi + 636
Vol. V: Index of personal names. xv + 681 pp.

Rev. by
Tomás G. Ó Canann, in JRSAI 132 (2002), pp. 127-136.
Pádraig Ó Riain, in Ainm 10 (2009), pp. 125–132.

Cúirt an mheán oíche

5112.
Titley (Alan): An breithiúnas ar Cúirt an mheán oíche.
In SHib 25 (1989–1990), pp. 105–133.
5137.
de Barra (Séamas): An chairt bheathaisnéise ag Pilib Barún ar Bhrian ‘Merriman’ Mac Con Mara.
In SHib 30 (1998–1999), pp. 155–166.
Examines a biographical note (1836) on Brian Merriman, from NLI G 844; includes facsimile and transcription.
5231.
Ó Gráda (Cormac): Literary sources and Irish economic history.
In Studies 80 (1991), pp. 290–299.
4645.
Ní Úrdail (Meidhbhín): Brian Merriman: guth aonair?
In Éigse 36 (2008), pp. 169–194.
Finds themes analogue to those of B. Merriman’s in the work of his 18th and 19th century contemporaries.
6821.
O’Neill (Kevin): A demographer looks at Cúirt an mheán oíche.
In Éire-Ireland 19/2 (Summer 1984), pp. 135–143.
7928.
Ó Tuama (Seán): Brian Merriman and his court.
In Irish university review 11/2 (Autumn 1981), pp. 149–164.
7971.
Ní Annracháin (Máire): Cúirt an mheán oíche: saoirse agus fíorthacht.
In ECI 24 (2009), pp. 100–114.
8283.
Ó Diollúin (Séamus): An chúirt i gcéin: Cúirt an mheán oíche i gcnuasach Phádraig Feiritéar.
In Taighde agus teagasc 6 (2006), pp. 102–116.
9551.
Ó Cuív (Brian): Metre and phonology in Cúirt an mheán-oíche.
In Dán do oide [Ó Cléirigh essays] (1997), pp. 465–476.
9821.
Ó Crualaoich (Gearóid): The vision of liberation in Cúirt an mheán oíche.
In Folia Gadelica [Breatnach essays] (1983), pp. 95–104.
10249.
Ó Drisceoil (Proinsias): Anáil na hEagnaíochta ar Cúirt an mheán oíche.
In Bliainiris 6 (2006), pp. 130–142.
12239.
Ó Murchú (Liam P.): Merriman’s Cúirt an mheonoíche and eighteenth-century Irish verse.
In Companion to Irish literature (2010), pp. 178–192 (of vol. 1).
1679.
de Brún (Pádraig): Lámhscríbhinní Gaeilge i Ros Cré.
In Éigse 17/2 (Geimhreadh 1977), pp. 215–219.
Description of 6 Irish language MSS from Mount St. Joseph Abbey, Roscrea (Roscrea 1–6): 1. Foras Feasa ar Éirinn; 2. Cúirt an Mheán Oíche; 3. Laoi na Mná Móire; Tuireamh na hÉireann; 4. Lucerna Fidelium; 5. Meascra; 6. Bileog fáin.
12327.
Ó hAnluain (Eoghan): Cuirfidh mé faghairt i bhfeidhm más cruaidh dom: draíocht chun drúise in Cúirt an mheon-oíche.
In Saoi na héigse (2000), pp. 153–167.
12561.
Denvir (Gearóid): Curadhmhíreanna mearaí meidhreacha: athchuairt ar Cúirt an mheón-oíche.
In Saltair saíochta [FS Mac Eoin] (2013), pp. 43–56.
1732.
Mac Mathúna (Liam): Geilt sa chiall duine lomnocht.
In Éigse 18/1 (1980), pp. 39–42.
Includes the paradigm of geilt in both Early and Modern Irish.

Culin, Patrick (Bishop of Clogher)

5384.
Ó Riain (Pádraig): Saints in the catalogue of Bishops of the lost Register of Clogher.
In Clogher record 14/2 (1992), pp. 66–77.

Cummíne Fota

7830.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid S.): A life of Cumaine Fota.
In Béaloideas 39–41 (1971–1973), pp. 192–205.
Text from RIA C i 2.

Cummíne Foto

733.
Byrne (Francis John): The lament for Cummíne Foto.
In Ériu 31 (1980), pp. 111–122.
Edition, normalised to early Old Irish standard, of a poem beg. Marb friumm andess, marb atúaid (8 qq.) with translation and commentary. Based on MSS Brussels 5301–20; Rawlinson B 503; RIA C iii 3; Harley 5280; Yellow Book of Lecan; Book of Uí Mhaine; Leabhar Breac; TCD H 3. 18: for apparatus criticus, see G. S. Mac Eoin, The Lament for Cuimine Fota, in Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 17-31. Disagrees with some of the conclusions reached by G. Mac Eoin. Poem composed not later than c. ad 700.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid S.) (ref.)
686.
Mac Eoin (Gearóid S.): The lament for Cuimine Fota.
In Ériu 28 (1977), pp. 17–31.
Eight stanzas assembled from quotations in various texts. Authorship of Colmán ua Cluasaig (7th cent.) rejected. Three separate parts distinguished; linguistically dated to 10th/11th centuries. First line Marbh friom andes marbh antuaidh. Variorum edition, with Engl. transl. and notes. Based on MSS Brussels 5301-20; Rawlinson B 503, RIA C iii 3; Harley 5280; TCD H 2. 16 (YBL); RIA D ii 1 (Book of Uí Maine); RIA 23 P 16 (Leabhar Breac), TCD H 3. 18.

Cundún, Seán

12204.
Ní Úrdail (Meidhbhín): An elegy on the death of Fr Nicholas Sheehy.
In ZCP 60 (2013), pp. 151–174.
Do chuala geoin ag slóite ar thaoibh cnoic, variously attributed to Liam Ó hIfearnáin and Seán Cundún. Critical edition, from RIA 23 M 21 and 12 E 24; spelling modernized. With English translation and textual notes.
11688.
Mac Peaircín (Liam): Marbhna an Athar Nioclás Mac Síthigh.
In Féilscríbhinn do Chathal Ó Háinle (2012), pp. 445–466.
Ag taisteal liom fá smúit im aonar, by Seán (or Seaghán) Cundún. 70 qq.; text based on RIA 23 B 4 (with variants from RIA 23 C 5, etc.).

Curtin, Jeremiah

12719.
Bourke (Angela): The myth business: Jeremiah and Alma Curtin in Ireland, 1887–1893.
In Éire-Ireland 44/3-4 (Fall/Winter 2009), pp. 140–170.